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Full text of "TM E9-325A German 105-MM Howitzer Materiel"

DEPARTMENT . I5 JUNE m/ 



WAR DEPARTMENT TECHNICAL MANUAL 

TM E9-325A 

m 



GERMAN 
105-MM HOWITZER 




WAR DEPARTMENT 15 JUNE 1944 



RESTRICTED DISSEMINATION OF RESTRICTED MATTER— 
The information contained in restricted documents and the essential char- 
acteristics of restricted materiel may be given to any person known to be in 
the service of the United States and to persons of undoubted loyalty and 
discretion who are cooperating in Government work h but will not be com- 
municated to the public or to the press except by authorized military public 
relations agencies. (See also paragraph 23b,AR 38Q-5 t 15 March 1WJ 



ni v ™iu f~*nr\nli* Original from 

Digged by kjOOgIL UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



WAR DEPARTMENT 
Washington 25, D, C„ 15 June 1944 



TM E9-325 A, German 105-mm Howitzer Materiel, is published 
for the information and guidance of all concerned. 



Ta.G. 300.7 (23 Dec 42)1 
L<m 461/302+S J 



By order of the Secretary of War: 

G. C. MARSHALL, 

Chief of Staff. 

Official: 

J. A. ULIO, 

Major General, 

The Adjutant General 



Distribution: As prescribed in Par 9a, FM 21-6; 



(For explanation of symbol, see FM 21-6.) 

( V 



I. , • 



L ■ 



* 

■ ■ 



■ 



■ 



Original fron 



*tV v y UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



CONTENTS 



mm 

k it 



CHAPTER 1. Introduction 



■ r^ ii aaaa ri ■ ■Bar! ■ ■ ■■■ 



1-3 1-6 



CHAPTER 2. German 105-mm Howitzer and 

Carriage , ,-. 

Section I. Description and functioning of 

howitzer , 

rin r-i-i-rr 

II. Description and functioning of 
carriage 



4-45 



/>■*»'*■ ■ l H .| .t _». h h .| _____ + , j H^--hH ^* +- * 

r l C ^5 . ._ , _bL.I---LLJ. + BJB 

V. Care and preservation 

VL Inspection and adjustment 

VII. Malfunctions and corrections 

VIIL Disassembly and assembly 

CHAPTER 3, Sighting and Fire Control 

Equipment 

Section I Sighting equipment 

II. Fire control equipment 

C^IAPTER 4. Ammunition 

CHAPTER 5- Accessories 



7-19 
20-28 

29 
30-37 

38 
39^0 
41^15 



* i ■ ■ ■ r 



r ------ i n 4 - - 



CHAPTER 7, References 
INDEX 



■■■-r. 



■ - ■ 7, ■ - - t - J ■ ■ 



61-75 
76 
77-79 
80-82 



7- 84 

7- 15 

16- 39 
55 
56 
56- 76 
77- 80 
80- 81 
82- 84 



46-60 85-140 
46-52 85- 98 
98-140 
141-162 
163-167 
168-212 
213-214 
215-218 




jfjA'rttfti* Original From 



UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



■ 



This page has been left blank intentionally. 



{^""ru^fi lf> Original From 

byl*UU£}lt UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 
1-2 

RESTRICTED 
CHAPTER 1 

INTRODUCTION 

1. SCOPE, 

a* This manual is published for the information and guidance of 
the using arms and services. 

h. There is included the technical information required for identi- 
fication use, and care of the German 105 -mm howitzer, as much as 
can be ascertained from printed matter and the materiel on hand. 

c- In all cases where the nature of the repair, modification, or 
adjustment is beyond the scope or facilities of the unit, or beyond the 
scope of this manual, the responsible Ordnance service should be 
informed so that proper instructions may be issued. 

2. CHARACTERISTICS. 

a. The German 105-mm howitzer comprises a tube, breech 
mechanism, and safety lock. The breech mechanism consists of a hori- 
zontal sliding breechblock which slides in the breech ring recess. The 
movement of the breechblock is controlled by the breechblock oper- 
ating lever* Firing of the howitzer is performed through the action 
of the firing mechanism housed within the firing mechanism recess 
of the breechblock. 

b. Witness lines are cut into the muzzle face of the tube, for use 
when using the bore sighting equipment 

c. The carriage is of the split-trail type and is equipped with solid 
rubber-tired wheels. Brakes are provided and are operated by straps 
connected to the brake lever. Extensions to these straps are pro- 
vided so that the brakes can be both released or applied from the 
limber or prime mover. The piece is safely towed at 25 miles per 
hour on concrete roads or secondary gravel roads. 

d* In addition to its use as divisional artillery, the German 
105-mm howitzer is used as an antitank weapon. For fire against 
tanks, it uses an armor-piercing shell with base percussion fuze, or 
field howitzer shell with the same fuze. The armor-piercing shell is 
used only up to 1,635 yards. For antitank fire, the howitzer can be 
fired without opening the split trail. 

e. In the German military organization, one battery in each 
divisional artillery medium battalion is equipped with the 105-mm 
howitzer. It is normal to place this battery with the advance guard, 
thereby making maximum use of its range. When horse-drawn, the 
materiel is transported in two loads, and when motorized, it is trans- 
ported in one load, 

1 

m f f\f\£t\fr Original from 

Difj'Jizad by VjUU^IL UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



Figure 7— German lOS-mm Hawitttr and Carriage — Wring Position 



TM E9-325A 




Flgura 3 — Garmait 7 05- mm HowJher and Carriage — Frant Vlaw 

4 

ry . , v f~*rt*\€5l/3* Origins J from 

O L UNIVERSITY Of CALIFORNIA 



INTRODUCTION 



TM E9-325A 

3 



3. DATA* 

a. General Data. 

Weight of howitzer and carriage ... 4,255 lb 

Weight of tube with breech mechanism . 1,160 lb 

Tvlaximum range , * — 11,674 yd 

Maximum muzzle velocity 1,542 ft per sec 

Weight of shell (std) , 32.65 lb 

Affreight of explosive -. rr 3*0 lb 

b. German 10 5- mm Howitzer, 1936* 

Total length of howitzer 115/78 in. 

Depth of breech recess H 9.06 in. 

l in. 

l^ength of bore . . . ,,,. r ,, T ,-- s»> ■•■.*+>i ■■■ ■■ ■ ■ ■ 92 in* 

* Diameter across grooves 4.235 in. 

^ 1-^ ia meter across 1 ands > r c ,,,, r r , i,-, - - 4- 140 in. 

Depth of groove , - 0*047 in. 

* * Maximum diameter of powder chamber 4.545 in. 

Width of grooves: 

At top , 0.240 in. 

in. 

Width of lands at bottom .. .. 0,174 in. 

F^Jurntjer of lands .. , 32 

Number of grooves _ 32 

Twist at origin of rifling , 6 deg 

***Twist at muzzle — . ... .12 deg 

c. Weights and Dimensions of Carriage, 

Weights: 

Complete equipment 4,312 lb 

T T M 1\JL J. , _ ■■ ■ I ■ H _ j. . . _ r _'i + 4 . + +.}.-,_,_,,_,..+ ,.,,. %J f J- -i- U 

Spade i 84 lb 

Trail leg. left, with fittings 313 lb 

Trail leg, right, with fittings 332 lb 

Cradle r <i -it '-r I- ■ i H ■ r ■ ■ I i ■» i r-if - i ■» - -i - r - i-.--.-ri I ■ ■ r i t ■ i m. m u t 275 lb 

C^HHIp 114 lh 

" h-M 11-J . . . . , ... . . ^ , . ...... ( ... , ..... , , i - - - WVT m\*mT 

163 lb 

Axle body and brake gear ... 584 lb 

Equihbrator ... r 43 lb 

Trail eye 1 in. from ground 407 lb 

Trail eye 30 in. from ground ,. 338 lb 



♦The diamctFM liatvd arc the bHuitivd rero poirna used m Star gaging 

•*The diameter listed it the section of the powder chamber which lemtf ttie cartridge c**e, 
"•The riftint if of P uniformly increasing fwjit, 

s 



ru-v. *u C^i^>fili> Orfginal from 



UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 

3 

GERMAN 1Q5-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 

Capacities (liquid): 

Recuperator cylinder (approx) ■-■y^X-x^-m *|. ..... . — v — ■ » >_-t I ■■■■ 10 pt 

Recoil cylinder (approx) 12Vz pt 

Cooling tank (approx) > 14 pt 

Air pressures: 

Recuperator cylinder , 710 lb per sq in. 

Equilibrator 510 lb per sq in. 

Elevation and traverse: 

Maximum elevation (approx) ........ 42 de£ 

Maximum depression Minus 6 deg 30 min 

Traverse 28 deg right; 28 deg left 

Dimensions: 

Over-all width of carriage . 77 Va in. 

Recoil: 

Metal to metal , , ...46,9 in, 

Normal .... 433 in. 

Ground clearance ... , 14.5 in. 

Trunnion height..,.. ......... 46.5 in. 

Distance between hinge pins of trail arms 25*3 in + 

tn. 

^ t f 1 1 1*""$ .... ■ ■ ■ - - ■ .... - . . , — - L E"L ■ 

Trsck of C3.rrifl^c __. . 6IV2 in.* 

Trail length, over-all 135 l / 3 in. 

Brake fcjand diameter — .... r 19 in. 

Trail length to center of hinge pin. 127 in. 

Cradle length 107 Vi in. 

Cradle width between trunnions . ... 14% in. 

Cradle length, front end to beating face 68 in, 

Cradle, over-ail length of slides ... .90 tit* 

Cradle, width of slide 1. 675 in. 

Cradle, thickness of slide 0.4 in, 

(Z-radle, depth . ..J*.. .<■,.,> 5-505 in. 

Cradle, thickness of plate * 0.130 in. 

Saddle, thickness of plate 0.125 in. 

Shield, thickness of plate — « 0.132 in. 

Trail, distance between spade tips 155 % in. 

Articulation, trail arms open for firing 7*5 in. 

Articulation, trail arms closed for traveling 5.5 to 5.7 in. 

Efforts: 

Elevating gear . 6 to 10 lb 

Traversing gear 3 to 5 lb 

Essential translations: 
Feuer 



Sicher .... Safe 

Achtung , Caution 

Feuerpause Stop firing 

6 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 

4-5 

CHAPTER 2 

GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER AND CARRIAGE 

Section I 

DESCRIPTION AND FUNCTIONING OF HOWITZER 

4, GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER, 1936, 

a- The German 105-mm howitzer, 1936, includes the tube and 



b. The barrel is of solid construction. At the breech end a collar 
is formed, the outer edge being chamfered to meet a corresponding 
chamfer in the breech ring. In the rear of the collar, part of the barrel 
is ground to receive the jacket. The barrel is then tapered to the 
recess for the spring clip. A cartridge stop base is formed in front of 
the collar, as there is no cartridge recess* 

c. The under side of the breech ring is recessed to receive a de- 
tachable gun lug. A bracket is secured on the upper face of the breech 
ring. A clinometer plane, or leveling surface* is cut on the left of the 
breech ring. Positioning of the clinometer is done by means of fillister- 
head screws. 

d* The front part of the breech ring is machined to form a buttress 
thread, in front of which there is a stop. This stop t with a correspond- 
ing stop on the jacket, forms a stuffing box to receive a packing ring. 
Behind the threaded portion, a cone engages the chamfer at the breech 
end of the barrel. The cartridge clearance in the breech ring is cut 
to three radii at different centers, so as to form a "lead-in' T to the 
chamber when ramming the projectile. 

S. BREECH MECHANISM. 

a. General. The breech mechanism (figs, 4 and 5) includes the 
breechblock, breechblock operating lever, and safety tack (figs. 8 and 
9), The breech mechanism is of the horizontal sliding breechblock 
type. The breechblock is held closed by the lever latch trigger on the 
operating lever engaging in a recessed insert on the top of the breech 
ring (fig, 6). 

h. Breechblock, 

(1) The breechblock is rectangular in form. A semicircular open- 
ing is provided which is in axial alinement with the tube when the 
breech is open, and provides a guide for the ammunition* Another 
opening is provided which is in axial alinement with the tube when 
the breechblock is in the closed position, and which houses the firing 



|~ Original From 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 

5 

DESCRIPTION AND FUNCTIONING OF HOWITZER 



LEVER LATCH 
TRIGGER 



BREECHBLOCK OPERATING LEVER 



EXTRACTOR 
BOLT 



FIRING 
LEVER 




INSERTS 

BREECHBLOCK 



PLATE 



HA F& 55838 



figure 5 — Breech Mechanism— Front View 

(2) The breechblock is a sliding wedge. When in the closed posi- 
tion, the front face of the breechblock is flush with the front face of the 
breech recess in the breech ring- The left front edge of the breech- 
block is chamfered to force the cartridge case to seat, if it has not 
properly seated when the breechblock is closed, 

(3) The breechblock is recessed on the front face to receive a 
plate. Beneath this plate, a shim is provided to adjust the cartridge 
head space. The plate is secured by two sunken washers fastened 
in place with screws (fig. 5). 

(4) Inserts are provided at the ejection surfaces of the extractor 
ways. An insert is also provided at the end of the cam groove on the 
top of the breechblock, 

c. Extractor. The extractor lies in the recess of the breech ring. 
Two arms extend from the body of the extractor, and inserts are at the 
ends of these arms. When the breechblock is fully open, these inserts 
on the extractor ways of the breechblock engage with the projections 
on the extractor, forcing the extractor to rotate, and thus extracting 
the cartridge case (fig* 5). 

d. Breechblock Operating Lever. The breechblock operating 
lever suggests a crank in shape, one end representing the handle and 
the other its axis pin. A projection on the axis pin engages in a key- 



>y Google 



Onginal from 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



figure 




A — LEVER LATCH 
TRIGGER 



OPERATING LEVER £ 

> 



I 

C — RECESSED INSERT 



D — BREECHBLOCK 



SAFE" POSITION 1 



F — FIRE" POSITION 



C — SAFETY LOCK 



H — CAM SHAFT * 
SPRING FOLLOWER -H 



HI 
> 



RA fD 5581* 



■ech Open 




Figure 7— Safety Lock— 'TIRE" Position > 



TM E9-325A 
5-4 

GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 

way in the axis pin bearing of the breech ring to hold the lever in place. 
The breechblock is held in the closed position by the lever latch trig- 
ger on the operating lever handle which engages a recessed insert on 
the top of the breech ring. 

e« Safety Lock. 

(1) The safety lock (fig. 6) consists of three parts: the cam 
shaft, cam shaft spring follower, and cam shaft spring. The cam shaft 
passes transversely from the right face of the breechblock to the recess 
for the striker. At this point the cam shaft is reduced to a semicircular 
section which passes over a notched portion of the striker. This ar- 
rangement permits locking or freeing rearward movement of the 
striker by one-fourth turn of the cam shaft, When the safety lock is 
in the FIRING ("Feuer") position (fig. 7), the striker can be moved 
to the rear. When the safety lock is in the SAFE ("Sicher") position 
(fig. 8), the movement of the striker to the rear is blocked and, thus, 
the firing mechanism is locked. 

(2) The follower holds the cam shaft transversely in the breech- 
block in either the SAFE or FIRE positions. When the breech is 
closed and the safety lock set on "SAFE," the cam shaft allows the 
follower to move to the rear. The head of the follower then pro- 
jects from the rear of the breechblock into a groove in the rear face 
of the breech recess. Thus, the breechblock cannot be opened when 
the safety lock is set on SAFE. If the safety lock is set on SAFE with 
the breechblock open, the breechblock can be closed. As the breech- 
block closes, a chamfer on the rear of the breech recess forces the 
follower into the breechblock against the spring. When the breech- 
block is fully closed T the follower snaps back into the groove in the 
rear face of the breech recess and locks the breechblock in the closed 
position. 

(3) The design of the safety lock as incorporated in the firing 
mechanism allows the lock to operate only when the breechblock is 
fully open or closed. The projection on the crosshead crank (fig. 4) 
interferes with the movement of the arm on the axis pin until the 
breechblock is almost fully closed. Then, the top of the axis pin enters 
a groove in the upper face of the breech recess, and prevents the axis 
pin from rotating. When the breechblock is fully closed, the top of 
the axis pin enters a recess and is free to rotate. Thus, since the axis 
pin cannot rotate until the breechblock is closed or open, with the 
firing lever keyed to the axis pin, the firing mechanism can be operated 
only when the breech mechanism is closed or open. 

6. FIRING MECHANISM. 

a. The firing mechanism (fig. 9) is assembled in the axial hole in 
the breechblock. It is retained in its seat by a spring and retaining 

12 

m f ri^nlf* Original from 

Difj'Jizad by VjUU^IL UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



CAM SHAFT SPRiNC FOLLOWER 



CAM SHAFT SPRING 




AA PD 55*41 



8 



i 

i 

1 



o 

n 



Figure 8— Safety Lack— "S4FE" Position 



35 *0 

w 

(II 
> 



AXIS PIN 




STRIKER 



FIRING LEVER 




■ \* 



m FIRING PLUNG€R 

TRIPPING QAM FIRING PLUNGER SPRING 



STRIKER SPRING RETAINING COVER 



STRIKER SPRING 




RA PD 



Figure 9 — Firing Mechanism — Exploded View 



TM E9-325A 

DESCRIPTION AND FUNCTIONING OF HOWITZER 

cover- Projections on the retaining cover engage mating surfaces in 
the breechblock. 

h. The firing mechanism consists of a firing lever, axis pin, firing 
plunger, firing plunger spring, trigger, tripping cam t striker, striker 
spring, and striker spring retaining cover. The striker is a firing case, 
inside of which is a bearing plate- The pivot pins of the bearing plate 
are riveted over. At the front end of the firing case, the firing pin 
is staked in place. 

c. The firing lever pivots about its axis pin located in a horizontal 
groove in the right face of the breechblock. The rear end of the firing 
lever moves the firing plunger from right to left in the breechblock 
against the spring. A recess on the plunger engages a projection on the 
trigger and rotates it to the right (clockwise). The cam on the trigger 
engages with the tripping cam which pivots in the striker. The tripping 
cam is held in position in the striker by the force of the striker spring 
against the inner bearing plate of the striker. The bearing plate is 
pivoted to allow movement of the tripping cam. The plate has a pro- 
jection which engages a groove in the breechblock to assure correct 
assembly of the striker. In the rear of the striker bearing plate is the 
striker spring and its retaining cover. 

d. A pull on the lanyard rotates the trigger, and the trigger cam 
forces the striker, by means of the tripping cam, three-eighths inch to 
the rear> until the trigger cam clears the tripping cam. The striker 
spring then drives the striker forward nine-sixteenths inch to fire, 

*% Releasing the firing lever allows the firing plunger spring to 
rotate the trigger to the left (counterclockwise). The trigger cam en- 
gages the striker, forcing it to the rear. The trigger forces the tripping 
cam back out of position, thus allowing all parts to resume their 
normal positions under the action of the striker spring, 



15 




Original from 




TM E9-325A 

7 

GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 

Section II 

DESCRIPTION AND FUNCTIONING OF CARRIAGE 

7, GENERAL. 

a. The German 105-mm howitzer carriage is of the split-trail 
type. The carriage consists mainly of the cradle, recoil mechanism, 
recuperator mechanism, top carriage, bottom carriage, elevating 
mechanism, equilibrator, traversing mechanism, and trails. The top 
carriage pivots about a pintle bearing. The firing stresses are ab- 



EQUIL1BRAT0R 

ELEVATING HANOWHEEL 




LEFT TRAIL 



RA PD 5584* 



Figure TO — German J 05 -mm Howitzer and Carriage — Rear View 

16 

re^iii,^ h u f^nonlf* Original from 

ujgiuaw Dy \jw J£i<* UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 

DESCRIPTION AND FUNCTIONING OF CARRIAGE 

sorbed by the elevating mechanism, the worm and worm wheel being 
permitted to move, during recoil and counterrecoil, against Belleville 
springs. The spades, imbedded in the ground, prevent movement of 
the carriage. The equilibrator acts to neutralize unbalanced weight 
and reduce the manual effort needed to elevate the howitzer. Brakes 
are provided which are operated by straps connected to a single 
brake lever. 



a. The cradle is of box section. It is continued to the rear of the 
piece for about the full length of recoil (fig. 10). 




Figure IT — Recoil Indicator 

h> On the right side of the cradle is the recoil indicator (fig, 11), 
graduated in millimeters. The graduations in black are for normal 
recoil; the graduations in red are for abnormal recoiL During recoil 
a lug on the howitzer slide pushes the indicator slide to the point of 
maximum length of recoiL The reading shown by the indicator slide 
may not be true in all cases as the slide fits loosely on the indicator 
and is moved easily. There is no provision made to stop further 
movement of the slide after the howitzer reaches maximum recoiL 

9. EQUILIBRATOR MECHANISM. 

a. A single hydropneumatic equilibrator (tig. 12) is provided 
on the right hand side of the carriage, It is a sealed chamber filled 
with compressed air, the pressure of which was varied by means of 

17 

rM«iii«M* Uii C^nriO lo Original Prom 

Olgili*eo by v.*uugii UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 
9 

GERMAN 10S-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 




Ffgir* 12— EquJHbrofor 
18 



| . CrVigmal horn 

cy L LI N I V E R r >H Y OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-32SA 



9.10 

DESCRIPTION AND FUNCTIONING OF CARRIAGE 



the plunger which changed the air volume. This equilibrator pro- 
vides an approximate constant elevating hand wheel effort, through- 
out the entire elevating arc, both in elevating and depressing. The 
equilibrator is mounted on universal joints, at the trunnions by a 
heavy rotating yoke, and at the bottom of the plunger by a universal 
joint which is pinned to the support. The trunnions rest freely in 
their mounting yoke, being held there by the internal air pressure 
which tends to separate the plunger and the housing and air chamber. 
The joint between the housing and air chamber is sealed by means 
of lead and bronze gaskets. The air rilling valve is the same as 
provided on the recuperator mechanism. 

b. The plunger, which may be easily removed from the equili- 
brator, is a hollow steel rod with a fine ground finish. It is centered 
at the top by a bronze insert forming a shoulder in the housing, and 
at the bottom by the packing and packing gland follower. The lower 
end of the plunger is protected by a leather bellows. 

c. The packing consists of a single cup leather packing sup- 
ported by bronze glands. The packing gland follower contains an 
anti-friction metal insert and a felt wiper. Assisting the cup leather 
packing is approximately 12 ounces of liquid. This liquid helps to 
effect the air seal. 

d. Upon elevating the howitzer, the plunger pivots about its 
lower support, The housing and air chamber are forced upward under 
the action of the compressed air and assists in elevating the howitzer. 
The plunger withdraws as the howitzer elevates. Consequently the 
air pressure decreases, thus decreasing the assistance to elevation. 

Upon depressing the howitzer, the above cycle is reversed: 
the air pressure increases and counterbalances the increasing move- 
ment due to the shift in the howitzer. 

10. RECOIL MECHANISM* 

a. General. The recoil mechanism is of the independent hydro- 
pneumatic type, with a direct contact recuperator* It consists of five 
main parts, as follows: cooling cylinder, recoil cylinder, recoil piston 
and rod, control rod, and front cap. 

b. Cooling Cylinder. 

(1) The cooling cylinder is of steel, having a lug at its front 
end, to locate itself in its correct position with the front cap. There 
are two internal flanges, one at each end, which act as centralizers, 
and also supporting rings for the joint packing (greased square). On 
the outside of the cylinder near the front end are two projections, one 
for the filler cap and one for the drain plug (fig, 13). 

(2) The filler cap is fastened over the projection for filling, and 
is held in position by a bayonet fastening. Inside the cap is a spring 




Oriqinal from 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 
10 

■ 

GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 




Figure 73— Recoil and Recuperator Cylinders 



and plate to prevent spilling while traveling, and to allow any excess 
pressure due to heat to escape during firing. This cylinder may welt 
be called a heat transfer cylinder since it will cool or heat the recoil 
liquid. 

(3) A bronze ring supporting packing is fitted in the rear end 
of the cylinder. 

c. Recoil Cylinder. 

(1) The recoil cylinder is of steel, enlarged at both ends and 
lead coated externally, The front and rear ends are serrated for 
the use of spanner and locking plates. A flange is formed externally 
near the front end to form an inner supporting ring for packing in 
conjunction with cooling cylinder. The cylinder is threaded externally 
to suit the rear nut securing cooling cylinder The cylinder is threaded 
internally at each end, the front end for the reception of the front 
cap or expansion chamber, and the rear end to take the stuffing box 
(fig. 13). 

(2) The stuffing box is of steel, being threaded externally at both 
ends, with hexagon formed about the center. The box is bored in- 
ternally to accommodate a supporting ring at its front end, 12 turns 

20 

Original from 

Digitized by liUOglt UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



FILLING PLUG 

JCOOLJNG CYLINDER 
(FILLING HOLE 

COOLING CYLINDER 



COOLING CYLINDER FOLLOWER v 

PACKING x / C0MPftESSlNG GEAR 




y \ PORTS x CONTROL ROD 

\ N THROTTLING VALVE 

fA|R PLUGS COOLING \ SLEEVE 
RELEASE CYLINDER HOUSING 

PLUGS DRAIN PLUG 



RAFD 10011 



GLAND 

RECOIL 
ROD 
PLUG 

AM 

RELEASE 
PLUG 



ADJUSTING 
ROD 

PINION 



Figure 14— Retail Candor Assembly 



TM E9-325A 
10 

GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 

of packing, and a rear supporting ring. The rear supporting ring is 
held in position by a steel cap, threaded internally, while externally 
on the outer periphery is cut a spur wheel Two locking plates are 
secured by screws to two flats of the hexagon. 

d. Recoil Piston and Rod. 

(1) The piston is made of steel, being hollow and threaded 
internally at both ends (fig. 14). The hollow portion takes a throttle 
or sliding bushing, while the threaded portions receive the piston rod, 
and sleeve securing sliding bushing. Externally, the piston is cut to 
receive a sleeve, and its rear face is cut at an angle of 15 degrees 
through which eight ports are cut to connect to the interior. The sleeve 
is held in position by the sleeve securing sliding bushing. 

(2) The throttle or sliding bushing of the recoil mechanism is 
fitted inside the piston head, and has longitudinal movement. It is 
bored longitudinally throughout to allow passage of the control rod. 
In this boring are also cut four longitudinal grooves, 

(3) The piston rod is made of Steel, being hollow throughout, 
The front end is threaded externally for the attachment of the piston, 
while the rear end is threaded for the attachment of howitzer secur- 
ing nut. The rear end is closed by a screwed plug through which 
an air release plug is fitted. 

Control Rod and Plunder* 

(1) The control rod is made of steel, having a plunger fitted on 
the rear end. The rod is tapered and bored throughout. Externally, 
near the front end, it is threaded and flanged, while on the extreme 
end is formed a hexagon. The front end is closed by an air release 
plug, and the rear end by the control plunger. Holes are bored 
through the rod to assist in filling the control chamber or piston rod 
and also to control run-out. 

(2) The control plunger is threaded at its front end and connects 
on the rear end of the control rod, being finally secured by a rivet* It 
is tapered externally to the rear, having a longitudinal groove cut 
approximately five-eighths of its length. This groove varies in depth. 
The plunger is hollow, and has eight holes bored through it to assist 
in controlling run-out. 

f. Front Cap* The front cap is made of steel, being threaded on 
the rear end for its reception into the hydraulic buffer cylinder. It has 
a flanged surface through which two slots are cut for correct location 
to the cradle. It is threaded internally to receive the control rod. Be- 
tween the flange and the front end an expansion chamber is formed, 
which is connected by a small port to the buffer cylinder. Two filling 
plugs are arranged at the top of the Ranged portion and a drain plug 
at the bottom. A cover fits over the front end of the front cap, and 
is held in position by interrupted thrust collar with spring and plunger. 

22 

f^'rtd^nlr*' Original From 

■ a OJf^ v UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 

10-11 

DESCRIPTION AND FUNCTIONING OF CARRIAGE 

g» On firing, the howitzer moves to the rear, pulling the recoil 
rod and piston with it. Liquid flows through the ports in the piston 
head assembly; the throttling valve slides forward under action of the 
liquid pressure j and liquid is throttled between the throttling valve 
and the control rod. The control rod is tapered, and an increased throt- 
tling action occurs as the howitzer continues to move out of battery. 
This action plus the compression of the air in the recuperator mecha- 
nism absorbs the majority of the recoil forces* A portion of the liquid 
in the recoil cylinder flows rearward to the void created in the recoil 
rod. 

h* On counterfoil, the air pressure in the recuperator mechanism 
forces the howitzer back into battery* The liquid pressure in front of 
the throttling valve forces it rearward and partially closes the ports 
in the piston. Liquid flows from the front of the piston between the 
throttling valve and the control rod a and to the rear of the recoil 
cylinder through the partially closed piston ports- The liquid trapped 
in the recoil rod enters the control rod via the holes in the buffer, 
thence to the front end of the control rod into the front of the recoil 
cy linder, and follows the liquid path previously described to the rear 
of the piston, The liquid trapped in the buffer chamber is throttled 
as the buffer enters. In addition, a throttling groove is provided on 
the buffer. 



a. General* The recuperator (fig* 15) is hydropneumatic with 
tiquid (par. 34) and air in direct contact, and consists principally of 
the following parts: high pressure cylinder, recuperator ram cylinder, 
and recuperator ram and rod. 



( 1 ) The high pressure cylinder is a steel cylinder having q steel 
plug welded on the front end. This plug is drilled and threaded in the 
front for the reception of the recuperator ram cylinder. On the front 
face are two plugs and an air valve, One of the plugs is connected 
to the air valve and is used for attaching the adapter for testing and 
charging with air. The other plug, made of steel, is for liquid charg- 
ing. An interrupted flange is formed externally at the front end for 
the attachment of a cover which is finally secured by a spring plunger 



(2) The rear end of the cylinder is Banged and fits into the 
bracket supporting the recuperator on the carriage t and is threaded 
at the rear end for the securing nut It is bored through longitudinally, 
so that the front end will take the rear end of the recuperator ram 
cylinder. This front end has two ports (holes) cut in its front face, 
which connect to the longitudinal boring just in rear of the seating 
for the recuperator ram cylinder- The rear end is screwed to take the 



1L RECUPERATOR MECHANISM. 



h* High Pressure Cylinder* 



(fig. 13). 



21 




Oriqinal from 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



I 




TM E9-325A 

n-i2 

DESCRIPTION AND FUNCTIONING OF CARRIAGE 

stuffing box and gland. On the rear face four boles are bored to take 
four screws securing two locking plates, 

c« Recuperator Rant Cylinder, The recuperator ram cylinder 
is a steel tube closed at its front end by a screw-threaded dust cap. 
It is screwed externally at its front end for screwing into the front 
end of the high pressure cylinder, while at the rear, externally, a seat- 
ing is formed for fitting into the rear portion of the high pressure 
cylinder. A chamfered face is formed on the rear face of the cylinder 
to form a seating for the retarding valve* The retarding valve is held 
on to its seating by a coil spring whose rear end fits over a spigot 
formed on the stuffing box, 

d. Recuperator Ram and Rod* The recuperator ram is a steel 
rod, threaded at its rear end for attachment to the howitzer through 
the medium of two washers (one concave and one convex) and a 
nut The two special washers are for any slight misalinement and 
jump of howitzer. Near the front end is fitted a piston head, behind 
which two U leathers are carried, with supporting rings and securing 
nut* 

■ 

e* Recuperator Action. 

(1) On firing the howitzer, it recoils to the rear, taking with it 
the recuperator ram which in turn sweeps the liquid out of the re- 
cuperator ram cylinder into the high pressure cylinder* by the way of 
the retarding valve (pushing it off its seating), and through the two 
ports in the high pressure cylinder, thus increasing the air pressure 
through decreasing the air space. 

(2) In counterrecoil, the accumulated a*ir pressure forces the 
howitzer forward* and at the same time the retarding valve is returned 
to its seating by the spring, thus allowing only a certain rate of flow 
of liquid through the four small port holes in the valve. 

12. TOP CARRIAGE, 

a. The top carriage is principally of welded design. It is divided 
into two parts: the top carriage proper and the lower pintle bearing. 
Shims are provided to compensate for the variation in distance be- 
tween the shoulders of the upper and lower pintle bearings. The top 
carriage is of welded construction, except the reinforcements for the 
lower portion of the top carriage which are riveted in place. The 
bottom of the top carriage contains holes to prevent any water collect- 
ing in the pockets formed by the reinforcing braces. Two holes are 
provided at the front of the top carriage to allow access for cleaning 
this portion of the top carriage (figs- 16, 17, 18, and 19). 

b* The top carriage rotates on a pintle bearing attached to the 
trail support. The upper bearing consists of two parts: the end bear- 
ing and the rotating bearing. 

25 

f^'rtd^filr*' Original From 

■ v UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 




Figure H — Tap Carriage — Right Side 




Kt 
Ml 

Figure 17 — Top Carnage — Left Side > 



TM E9-325A 

GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 



LOWER PINTLfc BEARING 



UPPER PINTLE BEARING 




RA FD 5584* 



Figure IB — Top Carriage — View Showing Upper and tower 

Pinth Bearings 




PINTLE RA PD 55i4* 

79— Upper Pintle Beorlnf— FlaHe Jn Place 

28 



y GQOglc 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 

13 

DESCRIPTION AND FUNCTIONING OF CARRIAGE 

13. BOTTOM CARRIAGE. 

a. The bottom carriage consists of the trail support, main axle, 
pintle, auxiliary axle, leaf springs, and the mechanism which changes 
the means by which the forces are transferred to the wheels. 

h. The trail support pivots around the horizontal bearing attached 
to the center of the main axle. When the trails are spread, the move- 
ment of the trail support is limited to 6 degrees by replaceable lugs 
on the trail support striking projections on the main axle. The ends 
of the main axle are turned back to form stubs. The auxiliary axles 
are correspondingly formed , and they pivot around the ends of these 
stubs. The movement of the auxiliary axles are limited by projections 
on the auxiliary axle arm striking lugs on the stubs of the main axle 

(fig- 21), 




U PD 



Figure 20 — Potfftan of Locking Mechanism — Trails Closed 

c* When the trails are closed, the trail arm rotates a cam and 
contacts the bearing surface on the main axle. In this position the 
weight of the howitzer is transferred to the wheels by means of the 
leaf springs (fig, 20). 

di When the trails are opened, the trail arm rotates the cam in 
the opposite direction, causing the auxiliary axles to be locked to the 
main axles. Thus, the leaf springs are disengaged, and the weight of 

29 



rod hy Google 



Original Prom 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 
13-14 

DESCRIPTION AND FUNCTIONING OF CARRIAGE 

the howitzer is transferred directly to the wheels. Simultaneously, 
the trail arm is disengaged from its bearing surface on the main axle 
and the trail support is free to rotate about the main axle (fig. 21). 

14. ELEVATING MECHANISM. 

a. The elevating mechanism consists of a series of gears and 
single elevating arc bolted under the center of the cradle (fig. 23), 
The range of the mechanism is limited both in elevation and depression 
by the cradle striking the top carriage at points "IT (fig, 22). The 
elevating mechanism is completely inclosed except for the elevating 
arc and its pinion. The mechanism is designed to absorb the forces of 
recoil and counterrecoil by permitting a movement of the worm and 
worm wheel against Belleville springs. Provision is made for alining 
the worm and worm wheel, and for alining the bevel gears on the 
hand wheel and intermediate shafts (figs. 23 and 24). The maximum 
elevation is 42 degrees, and the maximum depression is 6 degrees 30 
minutes- 

b. The elevation of the howitzer in traveling position is limited 
by a bracket on the cradle which strikes the spring loaded pins ('*A/ + 
fig, 22). When the traits are open, the pins spring out into position 
shown and allow the cradle to reach maximum elevation. When the 
trails are closed, the flasks of the trails force the pins inward, and 
limits the elevation of the howitzer to 12 degrees 22 minutes, 

15. TRAVERSING MECHANISM. 

a. The traversing mechanism is of the screw-and-nut type, and is 
almost completely inclosed. Traverse is limited by the top carriage 
striking either trail flask. The traversing mechanism pivots about two 
points: the left trail pin and the rear of the top carnage (figs- 25 and 
26.) The mechanism is held in the left trail pin by means of an 
interrupted collar, and to the top carriage by means of two split bear- 
ing caps (fig. 26). Traverse of the top carriage is obtained by varying 
the distance between these two points by means of the traversing 
screw. The limits of traverse are 28 degrees to the right and 28 degrees 
to the left. 

b. Two indexing pointers are supplied for checking center aline- 
ment for the traveling position: one for the trails open, and one for 
the trails closed (figs. 37 and 38), 

16. TRAILS. 

a. The trail support carries a vertical pivot at each end for the 
trail arms. Underneath, it has a third and central pivot for the saddle. 
The trail arms are formed from deep channel pressings, with shallow 
channels riveted on to stiffen the open under side. 

31 

f^rtd^nlr" Original From 

■ v UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



■ 




Figure 22— Top Carriage— tear View 



TM E9-325A 

14-19 

DESCRIPTION AND FUNCTIONING OF CARRIAGE 

b. The jaw of the trail hinge is on the trail; a steel sleeve fits 
in the bushing in the body and acts as a distance piece between the 
jaws. The hinge bolt passes through this and tightens the jaws on to it, 
not on to the body. The extensions for locking the articulation are on 
the upper halves of the jaws. These operate a mechanism which disen- 
gages the leaf springs for firing when the trails are opened. 

17. SPADES* 

a. The traits are provided with two sets of spades: soft ground 
spades and hard ground spades, The soft ground spades are perma- 
nently attached to the trails and can be folded back over the trails. 
The hard ground spades are plates on the trail ends. 

h* The soft ground spades (fig. 32 ) are of a welded construction 
except for the tips, which are riveted in place. Trail hand spikes and 
handles are provided for moving the spades into position, and for 
swinging the trail into position. The spades pivot about an eccentric 
bearing. The eccentric locks the spades in firing position by position- 
ing a bar on the spades under two lugs on the trail. The eccentric 
is locked in position by a spring loaded pin in the operating handle 
engaging a locking hole on the traiL The spades are locked in posi- 
tion while folded back on the trails. 

18. WHEELS AND BRAKES. 

a, The wheels are of the fluted-disk type with solid rubber tires. 
The tires are an integral part of a rim which is bolted to the wheels. 

b* The brakes are operated from one lever located on the right 
side of the carriage in front of the shield. A transverse bar transmits 
the motion of the lever to the left wheeL Straps are fitted so that the 
brakes may be applied or released from behind the shield. Extensions 
to these straps are provided so that the brakes may be operated from 
the limber or prime mover {figs. 27 and 28). 

c. Each wheel brake is equipped with a means of adjustment to 
compensate for the wear of the brake lining. The adjusting mechanism 
is assembled in the brake mechanism. Brake adjustment is made by 
turning a small knob (fig. 28) located near the top of each brake 
drum. 

a. The drawbar is a welded component of the left trail. The 
lunette in the drawbar is too small to fit the pintle on an American 
prime mover. When it is desired to tow the piece with an American 
prime mover, improvise a method to connect the piece to the prime 
mover using whatever materials are available. 

33 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



i 




RA PD 558S3 



Figur* 23 — iterating MecbanUm 



Figure 24 — Elevating Mechanttm AmmbM to Top Carriage 



TRAVERSING HANDWHEEL 



PIVOT FOR TOP CARRIAGE I SEE POINTS "ET ON FIG, 26) 





PIVOT FOR LEFT TRAIL PIN ISEE POINT "A * ON FIG. 24) 



f igure 25— Tr o versing Mechanism 




figure 26— Traversing Mechanism Assembled to Howitzer Carriage > 



TM E9-325A 
19 

GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 




Figure 27 — Brake Straps-Hear View 

. Original 
ibyCjOD^k- UNWEBSITYOFCAUFORKIA 



TM E9-325A 

DESCRIPTION AND FUNCTIONING OF CARRIAGE 




Ffgure 28— Brake Strap*— Front View 

39 

1 \ s. uil t - Original from 

agwrecj try vjiwgi^ LiNIVERSITV Of CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 

20-23 

GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 

Section III 
OPERATION 

20. TO PLACE THE WEAPON IN FIRING POSITION. 

a. Certain steps are necessary to place the weapon in firing posi- 
tion. They are, in order: 

Ii. Disconnect the weapon from the prime mover. 

c. Remove all covers and place them out of the way. 

d. Disconnect the cradle traveling lock by raising the spring 
actuated knob (fig. 2°) on the cradle traveling lock lever, and rotat- 
ing the lever to the left- Swing the cross bar over to the right trail 
until the bar engages in its latch (fig, 30), 

e. Release the trail traveling lock by rotating the trail locking 
lever (fig, 31) to the right, as viewed from the back of the trails, and 
then spread the trails fully until they are automatically locked in the 
open position. 

f* Apply the brakes by pulling the strap connected to the brake 
lever, thereby pulling the brake lever toward the breech end of 
howitzer (figs. 27 and 28). 

g. The hard ground spades need no adjustment. If the soft ground 
spades are required, pull out the spring actuated knobs, and rotate 
the spade locking levers toward the front of the carriage to release 
the spade locking mechanism (fig. 32). Lift the trails from the ground 
and swing the spades over the trail ends (fig. 33). Rotate the locking 
levers to the rear of the carriage and engage the plunger in its hole to 
lock the spades in position. 

hu Set the safety lock in the FIRE ("Feuer") position (fig. 34). 

21. TO TRAVERSE. 

a. The traversing hand wheel is located on the left side of the 
carriage. Rotate the hand wheel clockwise for right traverse, and 
counterclockwise for left traverse (fig. 10). 

22. TO ELEVATE, 

a. The elevating hand wheel is located on the right side of the 
carriage. Rotate the hand wheel counterclockwise for elevation, and 
clockwise for depression (fig, 10), 

23. TO OPERATE THE BREECH MECHANISM. 

a. To Open (fig, 34), Grasp the breechblock operating lever 
and release the operating lever latch by squeezing the lever latch 
trigger. Swing the operating lever to the right and rear until the 
breechblock is fully open. 

40 

Krai t*£4i4 CZ rtrtfl I f> Original fro m 

by v^UU^IL UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



OPERATION 



TM E9-325A 




CRADLE TRAVELING 
LOCK LEVER 



RA to ii»*0 



Figure 29— Cradle Traveling Lock 

41 



Ordinal foam 
UNIVfRSJlYOFCriLlFORNIA 




Figure JO — Croti Bar fit Latched Position 




RA fO 55862 



figure 31— Trail Traveling Lock—Lock** PotWon 




Figure 33 — Spado Locking Mechanism Disengaged — Firing Position 




»*V J ~ ^/ftwiiiii^j 1 pi urn 



TM E9-325A 

23-25 

GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 

bi To Close (fig. 35). With the breech open, grasp the breech- 
block operating lever and swing the operating lever to the front and 
left, until the operating lever engages its latch. 

24, POINTS TO BE OBSERVED BEFORE FIRING, 

a. Recuperator Cylinder. Before firing, the recuperator cylinder 
should be filled to the proper capacity with Liquid, and charged to the 
correct air pressure (pars. 35 and 38). Examine the cylinder for 
leakage of liquid. 

bu Recoil Cylinder* The recoil cylinder should be filled to the 
proper capacity with liquid (pars. 36 and 38). Examine the cylinder 
for leakage of liquid. 

c. EquiHbralnir. The equilibrator should be filled to the proper 
capacity with liquid and charged to the correct air pressure (pars. 37 
and 38). Examine cylinder for leakage of liquid. 

d. Lubrication* AH points should be lubricated as prescribed 

e* Tube* The bore should be swabbed out with solvent, using 
a bore sponge, and wiped dry with the sponge covered with burlap. 
The gunner should examine the bore to determine if perfectly clean. 
If not, the bore should be swabbed again with solvent, then a wire 
brush should be applied until dirt or rust has been removed. Repeat 
swabbing and wiping operations until bore is clean and ready for 
firing* 

25* POINTS TO BE OBSERVED DURING FIRING* 

a* CAUTION: If the howitzer fails io fire when the lanyard is 
pulled, the following safety precautions must be observed: 

(1) Stand clear of the path of recoil. 

(2) Keep the howitzer at firing elevation. Do not depress the 
piece* 

(3) Keep the howitzer in traverse either on the target or on a 
safe place in the field of fire. 

(4) The breech will not be opened until 30 seconds after the 
second unsuccessful attempt to fire the piece. 

b, Recoil Mechanism. The action of the recoil mechanism 
should be noted, and the following operations checked: 

(1) Howitzer recoils its prescribed distance of 43.3 inches (1,100 
mm). Should the recoil approach 46y tfl inches (1,170 mm), it may 
indicate that the recoil mechanism is out of order. This point is 
marked with a warning "Achtung*' on the recoil indicator. A recoil 
length of 46 7 /a inches (1,190 mm) is also marked with a warning on 
the recoil indicator to stop firing "Feuerpause" (fig. 11). 

(2) Howitzer returns into battery without shock* 

48 

f^rtd^nlf* Original From 

■ a OJf^ v UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 

25-28 

GERMAN 105- MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 

(3) Leakage of liquid from the filling holes at the front of the 
recoil cylinder. 

26, TO LOAD. 

a. The ammunition for this weapon is semifixed, and of a weight 
that can be handled entirely by hand. The complete round is rammed 
home into the breech recess of the howitzer and the breech is then 
closed. 

27, TO FIRE, 

a. Firing of the howitzer is accomplished by pulling the lanyard 
to the rear. 

28, TO PLACE WEAPON IN TRAVELING POSITION. 

a. The steps necessary to place the weapon in traveling position 
are as follows: 

b. If the soft ground spades are used, pull out the spring actuated 
knobs and rotate the spade locking levers forward to release the 
spade locking mechanism. Lift the spades out of the ground by means 
of the hand spikes and swing the spades back onto the trails. Rotate 
the locking levers to the rear, and engage the plunger in its hole to 
lock the spades in position. 

c« Release the brakes by pulling on the strap connected to the 
brake lever release, thereby allowing the brake lever to trip toward 
the muzzle end of the howitzer. 

d. Release the trail locking mechanism by stepping on the foot 
pedal provided on the left trail (fig- 36). Should this fail to release 
the mechanism, the trails and trail locking mechanism will have to 
be shaken to get the mechanism to function, 

e. Swing the trails into the closed position, and lock the trails 
together by rotating the trail locking lever to the left to engage trail 
traveling lock catch. Difficulty may be experienced when attempting 
to close the trails when the bottom carriage is spattered with mud 
and dust. This condition will not allow the cams to be disengaged 
from the arm (fig, 20), (See paragraph 31 for correction of this con- 
d it ion.) These parts, therefore, will have to be pried loose. A similar 
condition may exist should moisture be present and the parts freeze 
together, 

f. Check the howitzer for center allnement in traverse as follows: 

(1) With the trails closed^ operate the traversing handwheel so 
that the indexing pointer on the top carriage is located over the in- 
dexing pointer on the outside of the left trail (fig, 37). 

(2) If the trails are open, the left edge of the indexing pointer 
on the top carriage should be alined with the right edge of the 
indexing pointer on the inner side of the left trail (fig. 38). 

50 

*u f^«^>fili> Original from 

Dtgjliffitf by ^UUgK UNIVERSITY OF CAUFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 



OPERATION 



INDEXING POINTER ON TOP CARRIAGE 

INDEXING POINTER ON LEFT TRAIL 




Figure 37 — indexing Pointer* — Troth Close a* 

51 



t\. H ivl 1 



On y i ml from 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 



GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 




Figur* 33— J*<ieii»g Pointer* — Traits Open 



Goook 



Original from 

uNivERSfn or cauforhia 



OPERATION 



TM E9-325A 

28 




AA tD 55873 



FJgurt J? — ilMtlon Inditing Pointers 

S3 

r^.vflU Ongirwl from 

' k ,l1 °N K UNIVER It. >F CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 
28-29 

LUBRICATION 

g* Bring the howitzer to proper elevation by matching the indi- 
cator on the upper equi I i orator support with the indicator on the 
shield (fig. 39). 

h. Subparagraphs f and g T above, should bring the taper pin 
(fig. 40) at the rear of the cradle in line with the taper cup in the 
cross bar of the cradle traveling lock. Release the cross bar latch 
(fig. 30), and swing the cross bar toward the left trail Make sure 
the taper pin of the cradle fits into the cup in the cross bar (fig, 40), 
Engage the cradle traveling lock by raising the spring actuated knob 
on the cradle traveling lock lever, and rotating the lever counterclock- 
wise, allowing the plunger to engage its hole. Seven holes are pro- 
vided for the plunger, the one nearest the right trail is the one nor- 
mally used, although any one of the others will secure the cradle 
rigidly enough for traveling. 

i. Replace all covers. 



Section IV 

LUBRICATION 

29. LUBRICATION INSTRUCTIONS. 

a. Excessive wear can be prevented by keeping the materiel 
clean and well lubricated. The life of the howitzer and carriage 
depends very largely on proper lubrication. Particular attention should 
be given to sliding and bearing surfaces of the slide bearing and 
breech mechanism. 

b« Lubricants, oils, and greases shown in the lubrication guide 
must be used as prescribed. 

€. Oil holes and similar lubricating fittings should be marked with 
a circle about three-quarters inch in diameter painted with gloss red 
synthetic enamel, in order that they may be readily located. NOTE: 
Do not paint the fittings themselves. For replacement, American 
Ordnance lubricating fittings are interchangeable with German fit- 
tings. Ordnance lubricating devices fit German lubricating fittings. 

d. The oil gun should be worked slowly, and the parts oiled 
should be maneuvered to insure proper distribution of the lubricant. 

e. Care must be taken when cleaning oil and grease compart- 
ments to insure the complete removal of all residue or sediment. Dirt 
or other foreign matter should not be allowed to drop into any of 
the lubricating compartments. 

55 

f- u ^rs\f* Original from 

Difj'Jizad by VjUU^IL UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 

29-31 

GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 



f. Operating personnel are cautioned when cleaning the howitzer 
to refrain from playing water from either a normal pressure or a 
high pressure hose directly against the trunnion bearings, since this 
will result in water entering into the bearings causing malfunctions 

g. Lubrication frequencies are based on continuous use of the 
materiel with frequent firing. 



a. It is of vital importance that all parts of the materiel be kept 
in proper operating condition in order that the weapon may be ready 
for immediate service. The proper use of tools, accessories, and lubri- 
cating, cleaning, and preserving materials provided with the howitzer 
and carriage will enable personnel to keep the materiel in proper 
working condition, 

b* Proper lubrication, with lubricants and intervals prescribed in 
paragraph 29, is essential to the care and preservation of the weapon- 
Examination should be made periodically to insure that lubricants 
are reaching the parts for which they are intended, 

c* The howitzer, carriage, and sighting equipment covers should 
be used when traveling, or when the howitzer is not in service. 

d. In disassembly, assembly, and inspection, extreme care must 
be exercised to prevent dust, dirt, and other foreign matter from en- 
tering the mechanisms of the howitzer and carriage, 

e. All spare parts, tools, and accessories should be kept in an 
orderly manner in the chests and containers provided, so that they 
can be quickly located when required. Items which are susceptible 
to rust or corrosion must be cleaned thoroughly after use and coated 
with a film of oil. 

f. If the howitzer has been under fire, it must be determined that 
the weapon has not been damaged to a dangerous degree before fur- 
ther use of the howitzer. Damage of a serious nature must be reported 
to Ordnance maintenance personnel 



a* Tube* 

(1) Immediately after firing, clean the bore to insure complete 
removal of powder residue and primer salts. Under no circumstances 



Section V 



CARE AND PRESERVATION 



GENERAL* 



31. HOWITZER* 



56 




Oriqinal from 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



3 M E9 B 325iX 

31 



CAM AND PRESERVATION 



will the howitzer remain without cleaning after it has been fired. Swab 
the bore with a cleaning solution of one-half pound of soda ash to 



thoroughly with burlap, a film of engine oil (SAE 30 above + 32 
degrees F, SAE 10 from + 32 degrees to degrees F), or light 
preservative lubricating oil below degrees, will be applied with clean 
dry burlap. If soda ash is not available, a soap sponging solution 
will be prepared by dissolving 1 pound of castile soap in 4 gallons 
of water. If castile soap is not available, issue soap may be used as 
a substitute. The soap should be shaved from the bar to facilitate dis- 
solving. It should then be added to the water and the water heated 
until the soap is dissolved, The water should be stirred as quietly as 
possible to prevent foaming. To avoid the necessity of handling large 
receptacles, as much soap as is required for all the water to be used 
can be dissolved in one pail of water. This concentrated soap solution 
can then be added to water in other receptacles to make up the pre- 
scribed proportions, Special precautions must be taken to rinse the 
bore thoroughly before drying, if issue soap is used in the solution, 
because of the possibility of soap leaving a gummy residue, and of 
corrosion from the presence of free caustic in the soap. In an emer- 
gency, water alone, preferably hot, may be used for cleaning. The 
cleaning process will be repeated daily for 3 days or more, until there 
is no longer any evidence of sweating. A uniform gray appearance is 
indicative of a clean bore. 

(2) Daily, clean out the bore by thoroughly wiping with clean 
burlap or wiping cloths, and oiling the bore with the grade of engine 
oil prescribed for the bore in paragraph 29. 

(3) Before firing, wipe the bore with clean dry burlap or wiping 
cloths, to insure that it is clean and dry* 

(4) During firing, whenever the rate of fire permits, examine the 
bore for powder fouling, 

(5) The cleaning of a cold howitzer tube after firing cannot be 
accomplished, normally, at temperatures below + 32 degrees F, be- 
cause the water in the cleaning solution will freeze in the tube. If 
cleaning can be done with the tube hot, and hot water is available, it 
may be possible to use the normal soda ash or other cleaning solu- 
tions. Otherwise, it will be necessary to add denatured alcohol, or as 
emergency alternative, grade A glycerine, or antifreeze compound. 
To ten parts by volume of cleaning solution, add the number of 
parts of one of the antifreeze solutions listed below. If it is not 
possible to mix a cleaning solution with an antifreeze solution as 
indicated below, the bore may be cleaned with dry-cleaning solvent. 
This should be done only in an emergency since it is not very 
effective as a cleaning solution. 




drying 



57 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 

31-34 

GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 



iT*r«i vtt|rtfi 


F. Akahel 


20 


2 


10 


4 







-15 


9 


-30 


16 


-40 


27 



5 

10 

13 10 
16 12 



32. BREECH AND FIRING MECHANISM, 
a* Breech Mechanism. 

(1) The breech mechanism should be kept clean and the parts 
well lubricated with engine oil Since no provision is made for lubri- 
cating the breech mechanism, it is necessary to disassemble, clean, 
and lubricate the mechanism when it is in use, and always after firing 
periods. When not in use, it should be disassembled daily and lubri- 
cated to prevent rusting* Dry-cleaning solvent is issued for cleaning 
purposes and may be applied with a cloth or brush. 

(2) A steel hammer must never be used directly on any part of 
the mechanism. A hardwood block buffer should be interposed, or 
a copper or plastic hammer or bronze drift used. 

(3) Constant care must be taken to detect any cutting or abra- 
sions on the breechblock and breech recess. If the mechanism does 
not operate smoothly, it should be disassembled and inspected. Scor- 
ing or bruising should be reported to Ordnance maintenance per- 
sonnel. 

(4) Whenever possible, the breech should be kept covered to 
protect it from dust and grit. 

b* Firing Mechanism, The parts require the same attention 
as the breech mechanism. Frequent disassembly, therefore, for the 
purpose of cleaning and oiling is required. 

33. CARRIAGE. 

a. Attention should be given to cleaning, lubricating, and loose 
or broken parts. Lubrication, with the method and frequency of ap- 
plication, is carried in detail in paragraph 29. 

b. The carriage should be given a general inspection daily or 
weekly, 

■ 

34. FLUIDS USED IN HOWITZER CARRIAGE, 
a. It is recommended that solutions of: 

(1) 70 percent antifreeze compound (ethylene type) plus 30 
percent water be used in the recoil cylinder. 

58 

f^rtd^nlr" Original From 

■ v UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 
34-35 

CARE AND PRESERVATION 

(2) 75 percent antifreeze compound (ethylene type) plus 25 
percent water be used in the recuperator cylinder. 

(3) 87 percent U.S.P. glycerine plus 13 percent water be used in 
the equi libra tor cylinder. 

(4) 100 percent water be used in the cooling cylinder of the 
recoil mechanism. 

35. FILLING AND CHARGING THE RECUPERATOR CYL- 
INDER. 

CAUTION: Air or nitrogen may be used in charging the recupera- 
tor system or the equitibrator. Under no circumstances will oxygen 
be used. 

a. Nitrogen, hydrogen, oxygen, helium, and carbon dioxide are 
supplied in similar high pressure cylinders- These cylinders are 9Y 1G 
inches in diameter and 56^ ft inches high, including the cap, NOTE: 
Nitrogen may also be issued in cylinders 8 inches in diameter and 
76V& inches high, including the cap. Acetylene gas is supplied in 
cylinders I2V4 inches in diameter and 41 inches high. Although the 
cylinders are marked and tagged at the supply point, the tag may 
be lost and the markings obliterated in transit. Errors in tagging, 
marking, or filling of a supply cylinder may result in serious damage 
to equipment and injury to personnel 

b. Valves of nitrogen cylinders have special round metric threads 
on the outlet. Apply flexible gas filling tube to the valve to see if 
the threads match. Screw the fitting on by hand. Do not force. If 
the threads do not fit by hand application, the supply cylinder does 
not contain nitrogen. 

c- Even though the threads on the valve do fit the threads on the 
flexible gas filling tube, the contents of the supply cylinder still may 
not be nitrogen because of an error in filling. To make certain that 
the contents are nitrogen proceed as follows: 

(1) Open the supply cylinder valve momentarily to blow out 
any dirt or moisture. CAUTION: If the valve turns white or becomes 
very cold, the gas is carbon dioxide and should not he used. 

(2) Place the mouth of a small balloon over the valve opening 
and slowly fill it to a diameter of about 1 foot 

(3) Shut off the valve- Twist or pinch the neck of the balloon 
to prevent the escape of gas. ■ Remove the balloon from the valve, 
and away from ammunition, oil, fuels, or other inflammable material. 
Then, with the aid of an assistant, continue, 

(4) Tie the neck of the balloon with a piece of light string. Cau- 
tiously release the balloon, If it rises, it contains either hydrogen or 

59 

m f~*r n kf~*filf> Original from 

Difj'Jizad by VjUU^K UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 




GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 

helium, NOTE: H the balloon walls are heavy t or if it is not inflated 
to good size, it may not rise even though one of these gases is inside. 

(5) Have the assistant hold a lighted cigarette, with a pair of 
pliers, about 1 inch from the balloon mouth. Unite the balloon neck 
and bold it so the gas will blow against the cigarette. Do not hold 
the cigarette in the band. Note the reaction when the gas conies in 
contact with the burning end of the cigarette, 

(a) If the escaping gas makes the cigarette glow intensely and 
then burst into flame, the gas is oxygen and should not be used in 
recoil mechanisms and equiiibrators. 

(b) If the escaping gas catches on fire, it is 

(c) If the force of the escaping gas tends to 
glow slightly at first, and continued exposure extinguishes the ciga- 
rette, it is nitrogen. 

(d) Helium will extinguish a cigarette in the same manner as 
nitrogen. However, buoyancy of the gas filled balloon (subpar. c (4) ) 
above, will identify the gas as helium. 

(e) If the escaping gas produces a yellow smoky flame, it is 
acetylene, 

dL Acetylene gas in cylinders is under pressure not exceeding 150 
pounds. If it is compressed more than ISO pounds, it is likely to 
explode spontaneously. It cannot be forced into recoil mechanisms 
and equiiibrators because of this low pressure. Therefore, if it is 
attached to a recoil mechanism or equi libra tor, the gas may back up 
into the acetylene cylinder and cause it to explode with serious 
results. 

e. Oxygen is especially dangerous to use in recoil mechanisms 
and equiiibrators. If a balloon is not available for determining the 
type of gas in the supply cylinder, the following test will determine 
whether the cylinder contains oxygen. 

(1) Place an open, clean container, such as a bucket or large 
open-top can, in a convenient location near the supply cylinder. 
Fill it with water, 

(2) Place a smaller can or bottle (1-pt to 1-qt capacity) in the 
water. Allow it to fill and sink. Grasp the bottom of the small con- 
tainer and hold it with the mouth down. 

(3) Insert the end of the flexible filling tube into the water, in 
such a position that it is just below, or inside, the mouth of the 
small container. 

(4) Have the assistant open the valve of the supply cylinder so 
that the gas emerging from the end of the tube will bubble up ii 
the smalt container and displace the water. 

60 



|„ Original From 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



CARE AND PRESERVATION 



TM E9-325A 

35 



(5) When all the water has been forced out, shut off the valve 
and place one hand over the open mouth of the small container to 
hold in the gas to be tested. 

(6) Remove the small container filled with gas to a safe place, 

(7) Hold the mouth of the container down. Remove the hand 
from the mouth, and immediately, but slowly, insert a long glowing 
splinter of wood, held with pliers, into the gas. 



(b) If the gas ignites and burns, or explodes with a pop, as the 
splinter enters the container, the gas is either hydrogen or acetylene. 

NOTE: The purpose of inserting the glowing splinter immedi- 
ately upon removing the hand is to make the test before the gas has 
had a chance to escape from the container. The purpose of inserting 
it slowly is to determine the reaction of the gas as the splinter enters 
the mouth of the container where the gas is mixed with air (plunging 
the splinter into the gas might extinguish the splinter even though the 
gas is combustible, because the gases must be mixed with air before 
they will burn), 

f. If the supply cylinder does not contain nitrogen, tag the valve 
"NOT NITROGEN" and make a special report to the nearest Ord- 
nance maintenance unit. 



Figm 41 — Recoil and Recuperator Cylinders — Front View 





HA PD <SS4U 




Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 

35 

GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 




Figaro 42 — KemovJitg Air Filling Pfflg 

g. The recuperator cylinder (fig. 41) is filled and charged in the 
following manner: 

(1) See that howitzer is in full battery position and secured. 

(2) Lay howitzer at zero degrees elevation and cross level. 

(3) Remove front cover cap. 

(4) Remove air filling plug (fig. 42)* 

(5) Open air valve and bleed all air pressure. Manipulate the 
air valve several times to make sure all air pressure has been re- 
moved (fig. 43). 

(b) Remove filling plus (fiff. 44V 

(?) Syringe or pour in liquid through filling hole until the liquid 
level reaches the bottom of the filling hole (figs, 45 and 46). 

( 8 ) Replace filling plug, 

(9) Elevate and depress several times, leaving howitzer at zero 
degrees on completion. 

(10) Remove filling plug. Liquid should just appear; if not, pour 
in more liquid until it overflows, 

a 

+ 

f~*" -\i \()|f> Original From 

Dlgili*** bf V»UUglL UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 



CARE AND PRESERVATION 




Figure 4 J— Opening Air 




Ff^ifr^ 4^^^^R ©hfo v Jn ^ Lf^jvf-tf FMJfw j Pfii£ 



n, f^rtrtnlr^ Original from 

Digitized by VjUUglt UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 

35 



GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 




RA PD 



Figure 45 — Filling With Recoil liquid. Using Syringe 




KA PD 68419 

Figure 46 — Pouring Recoil Liquid Through Filling Plug Hole 

(11) Attach air filling adapter, connecting pipe, and air reservoir 
to recuperator at air filling plug hole (fig, 47). 



( 12 ) Attach 



gage m 
64 





■ 









22 to adapter (fig. 48), 



Oriqinal fiwn 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 



CARE AND PRESERVATION 




RA PD 68420 



Figure 47— Attaching Adapter 

(13) Close air valve on recuperator cylinder. 

(14) Open air reservoir slowly until 750 pounds per square inch 
registers on gage. Close reservoir. Air pressure should remain con- 
stant; if not! check connections for leakage. 

(15) Open air valve on recuperator cylinder, 

(16) Open up air reservoir and charge recuperator to 730 pounds 
per square inch plus or minus 20 pounds. 

(17) Close air reservoir, 

(18) Close air valve on recuperator cylinder* 

(19) Remove connecting pipe, 

(20) Replace connecting pipe with bleeder plug on adapter 



(21) Open air valve. Pressure should read at least 710 pounds 
per square inch; if under, add more; if over 750 pounds per square 
inch, unscrew bleeder plug slightly to release excessive air pressure, 

(22) Remove air filling adapter and replace air filling plug, 

65 



Digitized by GoOgk 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 

M 

GERMAN 10S-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 




RA PO 6J423 



Flaur* 4#— Attacking Pranwn Gag* to Adapter 

M 

i Grigirul from 

DKJ.UMC9 by GoO^I 6 umVETlSlTY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9.325A 
31 

CAM AMD PRESERVATION 




Flgm 49— Attaching ■fttricr Ma§ t» Adaptor 

a 

f\^\^ t mtvt hw C^fYl^O ll* Original from 

' UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 

BE 

GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 




Figun 50— Kemevlng Tap Fitting Hole Plug 




TM E9-325A 
36 

CARE AND PRESERVATION 




■A Pft 41421 



F/firre 52— Aemov/itg 4fr Release FJiig on Expansion Chamber 

36. FILLING THE RECOIL CYLINDER, 

a* The following procedure is used in filling and charging the 
recoil cylinder (fig. .41): 

(1) See that howitzer is in full battery position. 

(2) Remove the two filling plugs from the front end of cradle 
(fig- 50), 

(3) Remove front cover cap (fig, 51) and remove the air release 
plugs (2), one on the expansion chamber (fig, 52) and one at the 
end of the control rod (fig. 53). 

(4) Remove air release plug from rear end of recoil piston rod 
(fig. 54). 

(5) Lay the howitzer at zero degrees. 

(6) Pour in liquid slowly at one of the top filling holes, until it 
overflows at air release plugs, closing each in turn as liquid appears. 

(7) Continue to pour in liquid until it appears at filling hole, 

(8) Replace filling plugs, 

(9) Elevate and depress several times and bring the howitzer 
to 5 degrees on completion. 

(10) Remove the two filling plugs from the front end of cradle, 

4f 

t\i v ^k. tf~*r\r\«li» Original from 

Digitized by ^UUgll UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 
3* 

GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 




KA TO t!42t 

Figure 53 — ftmmovlmq Ah R*J#ai« PJvg »■ Cftrtraf Rorf 




CiOOglc UNlVBSrS OF CALffORNIA 



TM E»-325A 

36-37 

CARE AND PRESERVATION 

(11) Pour in more liquid (it should be only a very small 
amount) until it appears at filling plugs. 

( 12) Replace filling plugs. Approximate amount of liquid should 
be 12 V2 pints. 

37- FILLING AND CHARGING THE EQUILIBRATOR. 

a. The following procedure is used in filling and charging the 

t*c\ 1 1 1 1 j Kr-a trtr * 

( 1 ) Lay howitzer at 4 degrees elevation, 

(2) Remove air filling plug (fig. 55). 

(3) Open air valve and allow all air to escape (fig. 56). 

(4) Remove equi libra tor. 

■ 

(5) Remove leather bellows. 

(6) Withdraw plunger (fig, 57). 

(7) Drain all liquid from cylinder. 




Figure 55 — Removing Air Filling Flag on EquUibrator 

71 

e« f^rtrtnlf* Original from 

DlgiUted by VjUUglt UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 




FJf nr« $6— Opining Air Volv* on £q umbra tor 

72 

DvHM *i GoO$le UMIVEftSlTY 0*F CWFOfiNLA 



TM E9-325A 

37 

CARE AND PRESERVATION 




Figure 57 — Withdrawing Nmnqtr 




m\p Original From 

'd 11 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 




MA 

figure 59 Opening Vofv© on A\r K#s#rvolr 

74 

Diprnwd ^-OOglC UNIVERSITY Of CALIFORNIA 



TM Et-325A 

37 

CARE AND PRESERVATION 

(B) Check condition of cud leather oackine. 

(9) Pour liquid into the cylinder to the amount of, approxi- 

(10) Replace plunger and secure leather bellows, 

(11) Replace equilibrator on mounting. 

(12) Attach air filling adapter (fig. 58), connecting pipe, and air 
reservoir to equilibrator at air filling hole. 

(13) Attach pressure gage number 22 to adapter, 

(14) Close air valve on equilibrator. 

(15) Open air reservoir (fig. 59) slowly until 600 pounds per 
square inch registers on gage. Close reservoir. Air pressure should 
remain constant; if not, check connections for leakage. 

(16) Open air valve on equilibrator and charge to 520 pounds 
t>er sauare inch 




f If ire 60 — Attacking B feeder Plug on Adapter 

75 

f^"r\*"4rili> Original From 

Diflili«<Jby^»Ut )V;it UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 

37 

GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 



and replace with 



(17) Close valve on air reservoir, 

(18) Close air valve on equilibrator, 

(19) Remove connecting pipe from adap 
bleeder plug (fig. 60), 

(20) Elevate and depress howitzer for trail of hand wheel 

(21) If handwheel effort is great in elevation, increase pressure 
to approximately 550 pounds per square inch. If handwheel effort is 
found to be hard in depression, allow air to escape to approximately 
480 pounds per square inch by loosening the bleeder plug. Test the 
effort at each 5-pound rise or drop in pressure. 




HA PD M4lf 



Figure 61— Taking Pressure Reading 



(22) The approximate working pressure is 510 to 520 pounds 
per square inch (fig. 61). Do not establish pressure above 550 
pounds per square inch, or below 480 pounds per square inch, in 
adjustment, as some defect in elevating gear or equilibrator is indi- 
cated by these extreme limits, 

(23) Remove adapter and pressure gage. 

(24) Replace air filling plug. 

76 



by Google 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 

38 



Section VI 



INSPECTION AND ADJUSTMENT 



38- INSPECTION AND ADJUSTMENT. 



Parti T* l« lnip*c**d 

f* Or4*r *f ln*p*4tf*1l 

The howitzer as a unit 



Pvivri Tft Obitrf 9 

Note general appearance and smoothness 
of operation of breech mechanism. 
Measure protrusion of firing pin, which 
should be three thirty-seconds inch. Dis- 
assemble breech mechanism and firing 
mechanism. Inspect parts for wear, burs, 
or other mutilations. See that they are 
clear and well lubricated. Note condi- 
tion of bore for erosion at origin of 
rifling. Examine bearing surface of ex- 
terior of tube for scoring or other muti la- 



Breech ring. 



mechanism. 



Adjustment 



The carriage as a unit 
Recoil cylinder. 



Inspect breech ring and breech recess for 
burs, roughness, or scoring. 

Inspect the bearing surfaces of the breech- 
block for scores or bruises. 

Inspect the condition of all parts; check 
for weak or broken springs. 

The howitzer is so designed that it re- 
quires no adjustment. If any of the 
parts show excessive wear, they should 
be replaced. 

General appearance. 

Check for the proper amount of oil in the 
system (approximately 12Va pints). 
To check: 

the howitzer at zero 
tion. Remove the filling 
from front end of cradle (fig. 50). 
Liquid should appear; if not, proceed 
as follows: 

Remove front cover (fig. 51). 
Loosen air release plugs (figs. 52 
and 53). Liquid should appear. 
In this case proceed as in steps 
(11) and (12) in paragraph 
36 a. In event no liquid appears, 
proceed as from step (6) in 
paragraph 36 a. 

77 



Oriqinal from 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 

38 

GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 

Palatt T& Obitrv* 

Check for proper amount of liquid in the 
system as follows: 

Lay howitzer at zero degrees and 

cross level 
Lay howitzer at 10 minutes depres- 
sion. 

Remove front cover cap* 
Unscrew filling plug slightly (fig. 44). 
This should cause liquid to appear; 
if it does not, screw up plug and 
repeat with howitzer laid at 30 
minutes depression. If there is 
still no liquid, recuperator requires 
a complete recharging. Proceed as 
in paragraph 35. 
Screw up filling plug. 
Lay howitzer at 1 degree 30 minutes 
elevation. Unscrew filling plug 
slightly. Gas only should appear; 
if liquid appears, reduce air pres- 
sure to zero t establish liquid level 
(par. 35) » and recharge recuper- 
ator. 

Check for proper amount of air pressure in 
the system as follows: 

Lay howitzer at zero degrees and cross 
leveL 

Remove front cover cap. 
Remove air filling plug (fig. 42). 
Attach adapter and pressure gage to 
recuperator at air filling plug hole 
(fig- 49). 

See that bleeder plugs are on the 
adapter and are tightened up 
(fig, 49). 

Open gas valve. Pressure should 
read at least 710 pounds per square 
inch. (Normal air pressure is 730 
pounds per square inch plus or 
minus 20 pounds.) If it does not, 
proceed as from step (11) in 
paragraph 35 g. 
Close air valve. 

78 



Parti Ta !■ Inftp«ct»d 

Recuperator cylinder. 



rvw< hi. fli-wtn Ir* Original from 

agnize* oy v»uugii UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 



INSPECTION AND ADJUSTMENT 



Part* Ta 1* lKp*ct*d 

fm Order ef lftip*ctioa 



Equilibrator, 



Elevating mechanism. 



Traversing mechanism. 



Point* T* Ofc**rv# 

Check elevation hand wheel efforts. They 
should not be excessive. Inspect to see 
that the proper amount of fluid and air 
pressure is in the cylinder. Proceed as 
follows: 

Try elevating gear of carriage for 

hand wheel efforts, in elevation and 

depression. 
If hand wheel efforts are found to be 

excessive, check the air pressure as 

follows; 

Remove air filling plug (fig. 55), 

Attach adapter and pressure 
gage No. 22 to hole for filling 
plug (fig, 60), 

See that joints are tight and 
bleeder plugs are on the 
adapter (fig, 60). 

Open air valves, Air pressure 
should read between 510 and 
520 pounds per square 
(fig, 61); if not, note the 
sure and, if below 520 pounds 
per square inch, equilibrator 
should be examined at joint 
and packings and a complete 
recharge given. If above 520 
per square inch re- 
peat as from step (18) in 
paragraph 37 a. 

Inspect to see that operation is smooth 
and that the mechanism is properly 
lubricated. Turn the handwheels back 
and forth and note the amount of back- 
lash, If it exceeds one quarter turn of 
the hand wheel, notify the Ordnance 
maintenance 



Inspect to see that operation is smooth 
and that the parts are properly lubri- 
cated, Turn the hand wheel back and 
forth and note the amount of back- 
lash. If it exceeds one quarter turn 
of the hand wheel, notify Ordnance 
maintenance personnel 




7? 



Oriainal from 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 

38-39 



GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 



Nrtt To U 

Hand Brakes. 



Wheels. 



Apply the hand brakes to see if they need 
adjustment. Adjustment is made by ro- 
tating each brake adjusting knob in a 
clockwise direction for tightening. 

Check for the proper lubrication. 



Section VII 

MALFUNCTIONS AND CORRECTIONS 

39, MALFUNCTION OF HOWITZER* 

a. Fails To Fire: No Percussion on Primer* 



Broken striker spring. Disassemble firing mechanism and replace 
Broken or deformed broken or deformed parts if available, 

firing pin or striker. The firing pin is staked in place. Remove 

peened over metal, unscrew firing pin 
from case, and replace with new firing 
pin if available. The metal must be 
peened back to prevent the firing pin 
from backing out. 

b. Fails To Fire Until After Several Percussions on Primer. 



Firing mechanism parts 
not working freely. 



Weak striker spring. 
Defective firing pin. 



Disassemble firing mechanism and examine 
carefully for burs and rough surfaces, 
and smooth with crocus cloth. Wash 
parts with dry-cleaning solvent to re- 
move gummy oil; thoroughly dry and 
lubricate with lubricating oil before as- 
sembly. Use SAE 10 engine oil below 
+32 degrees F, and SAE 30 above +32 
degrees F. 

Replace spring. 

Replace pin. 



Fails To Fire When Proper Pressure on Primer Is Obtained. 

Defective primer. Replace round. 

d. Fails To Extract Empty Case. 

Broken extractor. Carefully remove the case by operating 

preferably from the breech end, or else 
from the muzzle end. Examine the edge 
of the chamber for deformation or burs 
which might cause difficult extracts 
Replace spare extractors are on hand- 



Oriqinal from 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 
40 

MALFUNCTIONS AND CORRECTIONS 

40. MALFUNCTION OF CARRIAGE. 

a. Howitzer Returns to Buttery With Too Great a Shock* 

Improper amount of Refill to normal (pars. 35 and 38). 
liquid and air pres- 
sures in recuperator 
cylinder. 

Retarding valve fails to Jar trails to shake retarding valve free* Fire 
seat properly. two rounds. If condition persists, notify 

Ordnance maintenance personnel* 

t*. Howitzer Fail* To Return to Battery. 

Excessive Tnction at re- iNouiy uranance maintenance personnel, 
con stumng dox. 

Damaged slides, piston Notify Ordnance maintenance personnel, 
rod, or piston. 

Leakage of air pressure Notify Ordnance maintenance personnel, 
in recuperator. 

c Abnormal Length of Recoil- 
Improper amount of Refill to normal (pars, 35 and 38), 
liquid in recuperator 
cylinder* 

Presence of air in recoil Release the air from the cylinder by re- 
cvlinder. movintz the ft] line dJues, 

Improper amount of Refill to normal (pars. 36 and 38), 
liquid in recoil cylin- 
der. 

iL Excessive Efforts Required To Operate Ihe Elevating 
Mechanism. 

Improper amount of Refill to normal (pars. 37 and 38). 
liquid and air pres- 
sures in the equi libra- 
tor. 

Insufficient lubricant in Lubricate (par, 29). 
elevating mechanism. 

e. Difficulty in Closing the Trails 

Bottom carriage spat- Remove mud and dust to allow the cam to 
tered with mud and be disengaged from the arm (fig. 20)* 
dust. 

ai 

: u-ri V.ilH^IC UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 

4T-42 

GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 

Section VIII 

DISASSEMBLY AND ASSEMBLY 

41. GENERAL. 

a. Incidents of wear, breakage, cleaning, and inspection, make 
necessary the occasional disassembly of various parts of the howitzer 
and carriage- This work comes under two headings: that which 
may be performed by the battery personnel with the equipment 
furnished, and that which must be performed by trained Ordnance 
personnel 

b. The battery ^-rsonnel may, in general, do such dismounting 
as is required for .ery use. Such work should be done in the 
manner prescribed herein. Any difficulty which cannot be over- 
come by the prescribed method must be brought to the attention 
of Ordnance personnel 

c The battery personnel will not attempt to disassemble any 
part of the recoil mechanism not authorized in this manual, nor do 
any filing on the sights or howitzer parts; and then only by order 
of the battery commander on any carriage part. 

d. The use of wrenches that do not fit snugly on the parts should 
be avoided. They will not only fail to tighten the part properly, 
but will damage the corners of the nuts and bolt heads. There is 
also danger of spreading the wrenches and rendering them useless, 

e. Before attempting the assembly of the larger mechanisms, 
the assembling of the subassemblies should be completed. In all 
assembling, the bearings, sliding surfaces, threads, etc., should be 
cleaned and lubricated. 

42. DISASSEMBLY OF BREECH MECHANISM. 

a. The necessary steps to disassemble the breech mechanism 
are, in order (fig- 62 ) : 

(1) Set the safety lock to FIRE ("Feuer") position (fig. 6). 

(2) Open the breech until the extractor is clear of the breech 
ring. 

(3) Rotate the firing lever as far as possible and remove the 
extractor bolt. 

(4) Allow the firing lever to return to normal. 

(5) Close the breech sufficiently to allow finger pressure on the 
extractor tong to move the extractor into a recess in the breechblock. 

(6) Open breech and remove the extractor. 

82 

rw ui *~xi^.i-i\f> Original from 

D.g.Jizftdb/^OOglC UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 




Figure 42— irttcft Mtcflaftrifir—Erpfedtd Vltw 



TM E9-325A 

42-45 

GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 

(7) With breechblock out of the breech recess as far as the 
assembly lines marked on the breechblock, aline the projection on 
the axis pin with keyway, and remove the operating lever. 

(8) Withdraw the crosshead crank. 

(9) The breechblock and its remaining component parts may 
now be removed. 

(10) Withdraw the axis pin and remove firing lever, 

(11) Set in the safety lock to SAFE ("Sicher") position- 

(12) Press in on the cam shaft spring follower and withdraw 
the cam shaft* 

(13) The spring and follower may now be removed, 

(14) Press in on the firing plunger and withdraw the trigger. 
Then remove the firing plunger, 

(15) Press in on the firing spring retainer and rotate it in either 
direction and remove the retainer and spring. 

(16) Remove the striker and tripping cam, 

43. ASSEMBLY OF BREECH MECHANISM. 

a. Assembly of the breech mechanism is the reverse of dis- 
assembly. 

44. REMOVAL OF WHEELS, 

a. Removal of the wheels is accomplished as follows: 

(1) Block up the carriage so that the wheels do not touch 
the ground. 

(2) Remove the hub caps. 

NOTE: Under each hub cap is a locking wire that is sprung 
into place. This wire may fall out when the hub cap is partially 
or wholly removed. 

(3) Remove the cotter pins from the wheel spindles. 

(4) Remove the wheel spindle nuts, 

(5) Remove the wheels, 

45. REPLACEMENT OF WHEELS. 

a. The wheels are replaced in the reverse order of removing them. 
The short bend in the locking wire is inserted in one of the three 
grooves on the wheel hub. The rest of the locking wire is sprung 
on the lip on the wheel hub provided for the purpose. When the 
hub cap is screwed into place, the end of the locking wire with the 
short bend will seat itself into a small indentation on the hub cap, 
thus preventing the hub cap from backing out, 

•4 

/"* cYrwi I f> Oriqinal from 

Di{i5l'/L-o , ^ \\ K UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E»-325A 

46-47 

CHAPTER 1 

SIGHTING AND FIRE CONTROL EQUIPMENT 

Section l 
SIGHTING EQUIPMENT 

46. INTRODUCTION, 

a. The sighting and fire control equipment for the 105 -mm 
German howitzer includes instruments for laying the gun in direct 
and indirect fire, and instruments for observation. 

h. The sighting equipment includes the Panoramic Telescope 
Rbl. F, 32 ( Rundblickf ernohr 32) or the Panoramic Telescope RbU 
F. 16, of earlier design, secured to the telescope mount; aiming plates 
and aiming posts used to correct for shifting of the piece in firing; 
bore sights for alining the telescope with the piece; and lighting equip- 
ment for night use. The use of a gunner's quadrant for orienting the 
piece is indicated, 

c The fire control equipment includes the following instruments : 

(1) The aiming circle is used for measuring angle of site, azimuth 
angles, for decline ting, for spotting, and as an alidade for topographic 
survey for the battery, 

(2) The Artillery Computer 34 calculates mechanically the 
meteorological corrections for firing, 

(3) The Range Finder Em 34 is used for measuring ranges, and 
may be used against either land or aerial targets, 

(4) The surveying rod is used for initial orientation of the 

(5) The plotting rules and protractor are used on a plotting 
table for measuring map ranges and angles, 

(6) The fuze setter is a hand fuze setter used for cutting the 
time fuze. 

(7) The battery commander's telescope is the principal observing 
instrument of the battery. 



MOUNT, TELESCOPE WITH PANORAMIC TELESCOPE 
32 (Rbl. R 32), PANORAMIC TELESCOPE 16 (Rbl. F. 
16) ON EXTENSION SOCKET AND RANGE DRUM. 

a. Descripti 

(1) The telescope mount (figs. 63 and 64) is mounted on the 
left side of the carriage, and is used to lay the howitzer in azimuth 



rv bi C*r\r\n\t* Original from 

Digitized by kjUUgll UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 
47 

GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 

(2) The telescope mount (fig. 65) is of the azimuth compen- 
sating type which permits azimuth correction when the howitzer is 
elevated with the trunnions out of level. Provision is made for cross 
leveling and setting in angle of site, with the level vial and knob 
provided for each motion. The angle of site scale is graduated from 
to 500 mils. The normal setting is 300 mils. The angle of site 
micrometer is graduated from to 100 mils in 1-mil intervals. The 
range drum and range drum knob are set in quadrant elevation. The 
range drum bears two scales: one in mils (0 to 800). and one in 
meters (150 to 9,150), and the corresponding mil readings are from 
to 742 for use with the standard zone 5 charge. The pointer may 
be placed over either scale. The mount includes match the pointer 
indexes by which the elevation obtained from the telescope and tele- 
scope mount is applied to the barrel A canvas cover, with leather 
reinforcement around the telescope, is provided for the telescope 
and telescope mount, 

(3) The standard telescope (Rbl. F. 32) (figs. 63, 66, and 67) 
is a 4-power, fixed-focus type, and is positioned and locked in the 
teiescopo socket on the mount. The cam of the socket telescope lever 
engages a notch in the body of the telescope. The line of sight may 
be raised or lowered by rotation of the elevation knob. Coarse and 
fine graduations in mils are provided for reference in elevation of the 
head. The azimuth scales on the vertical barrel of the telescope are 
graduated in 100-mil intervals, the upper scale, to 64; the lower 
scale, to 32, A knurled portion permits adjustment. The center 
index is locked in place by a lug at the front of the telescope. The 
azimuth micrometer includes 2 scales graduated in mils from to 100 
mils. The index between the scales is fixed. It is believed that one 
scale is used for setting in corrections, and the other for setting in 
fine azimuth values, A throwout lever is provided for rapid setting 
in azimuth. A locking lever locks the azimuth micrometer in any 
setting. The reticle pattern is shown in figure 67. With the telescope 
mounted in the socket, the field of view is limited by the opening 
in the shield to 180 mils left and 214 mils right, approximately, This 
telescope also fits the extension which is furnished with the other 
telescope, 

(4) The auxiliary panoramic telescope (Rbl. F. 16) (figs. 64, 66, 
and- 67) is a 4-power, fixed-focus type and is provided with a sight 
extension. It is used to bring the line of sight above the shield. This 
permits the selection of aiming points at practically any azimuth 
from the gun. This telescope will not fit the telescope socket of the 
mount. The telescope has a cross level and longitudinal level, for 
checking the alinement when the telescope and bracket are secure 
to the mount. Since the levels ar not readily visible in this position, 
a mirror is provided on the telescope. The elevation scale and 

86 



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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 

47 

SIGHTING EQUIPMENT 




RA Pt> $5141 

Figure ©3— Telescope Mount Wiffc Sfandord Panoramic 

TeJeicope 

87 



^ . . . . I „ , Original from 

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TM E9-325A 

47 

GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 

micrometer of the head resembles those of the standard telescope. 
The azimuth scale is graduated in 100-mi! intervals and numbered 
from to 64, The azimuth micrometer bears only the fine azimuth 
scale of the standard telescope- The throwout and locking mechanism 
is the same as that of the standard telescope. 

b. Operation, 

(1) Direct Laying. 

(a) Set the elevation scale and micrometer on the telescope head 
to zero. Set the angle of sight knob to zero. 

(b) Set off the lateral deflection on the azimuth micrometer of 
the panoramic telescope. 

(c) Rotate the cross level worm knob until the bubble of the 
cross level is central. 

(d) Set off the desired range on the range drumu 

( e) Turn the longitudinal knob and the howitzer traversing hand- 
wheel to bring the telescope cross lines to bear on the target. 

(f) Turn the howitzer elevating hand wheel to match the pointer, 

(&) During the operation of direct laying, coincidence of tele- 
scope cross lines and target must be maintained, and the telescope 
mount must be kept cross leveled. 

(2) Indirect Laying. 

(a) Set off the azimuth of the target with respect to the aiming 
point of the azimuth scale and micrometer of the panoramic telescope. 

(b) Traverse the howitzer until the vertical line in the telescope 
reticle falls on the aiming point, keeping the telescope mount cross 
leveled. To cross level the mount, turn the cross leveling knob. It 
may be necessary to rotate the elevating knob on the panoramic 
telescope in order to keep the aiming point within the field of view; 
this procedure being permissible in indirect laying, 

(c) Set the angle of sight on the angle of sight scale and mi- 
crometer, then center the angle of sight level bubble by turning the 
longitudinal knob. 

(d) Set off the desired range by rotating the range drum hand- 
wheel, and reading the proper scale against the pointer. Quadrant 
elevation may be set off instead of range by using the elevation scale. 

(0) Turn the elevation hand wheel of the howitzer to match the 
pointers. The howitzer is now properly pointed at the target. 

(f) The telescope mount must be kept cross leveled, the angle 
of site bubble centered, and the vertical line of the panoramic tele* 
scope coincident with the aiming point, at all times during the opera- 
tion of indirect laying. 

88 

n!„itL. M iu..f^r*rknli> Original from 

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TM E9-325A 
47 



SIGHTING EQUIPMENT 



■ * - 



PANORAMIC TELESCOPE 
WITH EXTENSION SOCKET j 




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Mount WJfh Panoramic Tt bicope 



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TM E9-325A 
47 



GERMAN 10B-MM HOWITZER MATER 



MATCH THE POINTER INDEXES 



LOCATING SCREW 



TELESCOPE LEVER 



LAMP SLIDE 

RANGE DRUM 
RANGE INDEX 




ANGLE OF SITE 
MICROMETER 



ANGLE OF SITE SCALE 
CROSS LEVEL 

ANGLE OF SITE LEVEL 



RANGE DRUM HAND WHEEL 
rLONClTUDlNAL LEVELING NUT 



figure 65— Telescope Mount 



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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 
47 

SIGHTING EQUIPMENT 




*A N> 5S351 



Figure 66— Panoramic Tele*cop es — Fronf Vf#w 

(3) Use op Panoramic Telescope With Extension (fig. 64). 
The instructions given above apply to this panoramic telescope and 
extension as well, with the added condition that the level and cross 
level attached to the telescope be checked, to make sure that the 
telescope is properly seated and the extension is true, when the levels 
of the mount are centered and the angle of sight knob is set at normal, 

c. Tests and Adjustments. 

( 1 ) Verification of Telescope Mount, 

(a) Level the howitzer laterally (axis of trunnions) and longi- 
tudinally (axis of bore). Set the angle of sight scale and micrometer 
to normal. Center the bubbles in the angle of site level and in the 
cross level. Place a gunner's quadrant, the accuracy of which has 
been established, on the machined surface at the top of the telescope 
socket, and in a line parallel first to the axis of trunnions, and then 

91 

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TM E9-325A 

47 




TRANSLATION 

WE NIGER - LESS 
HOHEH r HIGHER 
TI€FER - LOWER 

HA PD 

Flgur* 67 — Panoramic T«fticap«i — fteor Vlaw 

92 

p. t <w4 Kw It loli 1 * Original from 

°^ ^ cV 1 " UMIVER5TTV Of CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 

47 



in a line parallel to the axis of bore. If the bubble of the gunner's 
quadrant is centered in both positions, the mount is in adjustment. 
If the bubble is not centered, it will be necessary to adjust the mount 
level in question. 

(b) Adjustment of the locating screws of the telescope socket 
may be made, using a panoramic telescope in good adjustment Bore 
sight the howitzer on a distant point and, with the telescope set in 
its normal position, turn the screws in or out to bring the telescope 
to bear exactly on the bore sighted point. 

(2) Verification of Panoramic Telescope. Place the pano- 
ramic telescope in the telescope socket of an adjusted mount and 
level. Cross level and bore sight the howitzer on a distant point. 
With each scale and micrometer set at the normal position, sight 
through the telescope on the point. If the telescope is not alined in 
azimuth with the point, the scale and micrometer require adjust- 
ment. Turn the micrometer to accurately aline the telescope with 
the distant point. Loosen the locking screw off center in the end of 
the micrometer knob, shift the micrometer to index exactly, then re- 
clamp the knob. If the azimuth scale is also out of alinement, loosen 
the scale clamp, adjust the scale, and reclamp. Check the new set- 
tings by turning the telescope away from the point, and then bring it 
to bear again on the point 

(3) Verification and Adjustment of Match the Pointer 
Indexes of Telescope Mount. The match the pointer indexes 
should line up with each other when the telescope mount and howitzer 
are level. One of the indexes has slotted mounting holes for adjust- 
ment. Adjustment may be performed by temporarily loosening the 
two screws on the index, and shifting the index to correct alinement. 

r 

d* Care and Preservation > 

(1) Refer to paragraph 60 for general instructions pertaining to 
the care and preservation of instruments, 

(2) Stops are provided to limit the longitudinal and cross leveling 
motions, and no attempt should be made to force the mechanisms 
beyond these limits. Avoid rough handling which might disturb ad- 
justment of the telescope and mount. 

(3) Oil cups circled in red are provided for lubrication of the 
bearings, and oil only is to be applied. 



Disassembling of the r. 
mount, other than the disassembling 
procedure, is not permitted, 




93 



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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 

48-51 

GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 

48. AIMING PLATES. 

a. Description. One or two aluminum plates (fig. 68 ) t gradu- 
ated in two centimeter divisions to a length of one meter, are pro- 
vided with each howitzer. Each plate has two detachable steel pickets 
for embedding the plate in the ground, When it is not in use, the 
plate is folded in half. Two plates are placed in a canvas carrying 
case. 

b. Use, The aiming plate is used with the split-trail howitzer to 
compensate for the shifting of the piece and telescope in firing. The 
scale is placed at a distance of 20 meters (65,62 feet) from the tele- 
scope to give readings of 1 mil. The center graduation of the plate is 
lined up with the aiming post and the telescope. If the piece and 
the telescope move, the displacement is read through the telescope 
in mils on the scale of the plate. The telescope is reset accordingly. 

49. AIMING POST, 

a. Two round wooden aiming posts (fig, 69), painted in alternate 
red and white bands, are provided with each howitzer. Each post 
consists of two sections which are assembled with a left-hand thread. 
The thread also fits the brushes used for cleaning the bore. The 
lower section of each post has a steel foot support for embedding the 
post in the ground. One of the posts is carried on the carriage, one 
section on the outside of each trail leg. It is not known whether a 
definite place is set aside for the other post 

50. GUNNER'S QUADRANT. 

a. Information on the gunner's quadrant is not available. The 
use of a quadrant in bore sighting the howitzer is indicated by the 
presence of three screws on the breech. The screws are used for 
positioning the quadrant each time in the same position. 

51. BORE SIGHT. 

a. The bore sight is used to indicate the direction of the axis of 
the bore for orientation purposes. Each bore sight consists of a breech 
element and a muzzle element. 

b« Description. 

(1) The American breech bore sight is a disk which fits ac- 
curately in the breech chamber of the howitzer. There is no informa- 
tion available as to the construction of the breech bore sight used on 
this howitzer although it probably resembles the American type. 
Where the breech bore sight is lacking, an empty cartridge case with 
primer removed is sometimes used, or the firing pin may be removed 
and the firing pin hole will then serve as the breech bore sight, 

94 

/"* cYrwi I f> Oriqinal from 

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TM E9-325A 

SI -52 

SIGHTING EQUIPMENT 



> 




tA PD S5JI3 

Figure 68— Aiming Plotei 



(2) Score marks on the face of the muzzle indicate that the 
muzzle bore sight consists of two pieces of string, stretched tightly 
across the muzzle, positioned by the horizontal and vertical score 
marks, and held in place by a strap. 



c. Operation, With the two elements in place, look through the 
aperture in the bore sight; the direction of the axis is indicated by 
the cord intersection. 

d. Care and Preservation* The cord and belt of the muzzle bore 
sight should be wound into a compact bundle when not in use. Handle 
the breech bore sight carefully to prevent nicking and burring. 

52. LIGHTING, 

a. The on-carriage sighting equipment and the fire control in- 
struments have individual lighting units made up of battery and 
battery box and cable assemblies. These lighting units appear to be 
interchangeable on German instruments, but may not be used on any 
American instrument. Two battery boxes are supplied. 

95 

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TM E9-325A 
52-53 

GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 

b. The shape of the battery is unknown but it probably is of 
flashlight type, fitting the battery boxes (fig. 70), The battery box 
contains a receptacle for the cable. Two types of cable assemblies are 
furnished: one, including a plug, cable, and lamp bracket; the other, 
a plug, cable, and double receptacle for extension purposes. The lamp 
bracket assemblies include a lamp socket screwed into the bracket 
which has dovetail slots for engaging the slides in the instruments. 
A shutter regulates the amount of light given off. A latch at the end 
of the bracket engages a notch in the slide for locking. The lamps 
are 3. 5 -volt, 0.2 -ampere, miniature screw base type. 

c. Slides are provided on the telescope for illumination of the 
reticle. Slides on the mount permit illumination of the range drum 
index, and the two levels. On the shield of the carriage is a hook 
for holding the extension receptacle, and for loose cable, 

d. The battery commander's telescope and the aiming circle have 
slides adjacent to the reticles, for attachment of the lamp brackets as 
required. 

e. A lighting device is also furnished for the aiming post. 

Section II 
FIRE CONTROL EQUIPMENT 

S3. AIMING CIRCLE. 

a. General. The aiming circle (figs. 71 to 74) is used for meas- 
uring angle of site, for decimating and determining azimuth angles, 
and for spotting. The instrument, removed from the tripod, may be 
used on a plane table for topographic survey. The aiming circle con- 
sists of a periscope, a telescope having 4- or 5-power magnification, 
an angle of site mount, an azimuth mount, and a tripod. The tripod 
is the same as that of the battery commander's telescope. Carrying 
cases for the instrument and the tripod are provided. A trench mount 
is furnished which can be embedded in the ground or in wood, for 
use in place of the tripod. A lamp bracket and portable battery sup- 
plies light for the telescope reticle. Graduations are in mils. 

b. Description of Components. 

(1) The periscope raises the line of sight, but has no magnifying 
power. It is attached, but not locked in place, to the aiming circle 
by a dovetailed slide. The aiming circle may be used without the 
periscope, 

(2) The telescope has an adjustable focusing eyepiece. Horizontal 
and vertical cross lines and a deflection scale are on the reticle of the 

98 

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TM E9-325A 

53 

FIRE CONTROL EQUIPMENT 

telescope. On top of the telescope body is a level used with the angle 
of site mechanism. On the left of the telescope is a circular level. A 
sun shade is provided for use when the periscope is not attached. 

(3) The angle of site mount supports the telescope, and includes 
a graduated elevation scale and micrometer, a magnetic needle, a 
circular level, and clamping devices. 

(a) The elevation scale is graduated from to 1,400 mils, and 
the micrometer from to 100 mils. The normal setting is 300 mils. 

(b) The magnetic needle has a visible range of 10 degrees on 
either side of the magnetic north line. A knob below the window 
marked "N" locks the needle when it is not in use. A window at the 
"3" end permits observation from the rear of the instrument. 

(c) The circular level is used with the compound head of the 
tripod for leveling the instrument. 

(d) Clamping levers lock the angle of site mount on the azimuth 
mount. 

(e) The folded 10-centimeter ruler (fig. 74) is for use when the 
telescope and angle of site mount, disengaged from the traversing 
mechanism, are in use on a plane table in topographic survey. 

(4) The azimuth mount has a tapered stud which supports the 
angle of site mount; an azimuth scale, graduated from to 6,400 mils 
in 100-mil intervals; and a micrometer graduated from to 100 mils 
in l-rnil intervals. A throwout lever permits rapid traversing of the 
instrument. The azimuth mount is clamped to the spindle of the 
tripod. 

(5) The tripod is used for both the aiming circle and battery 
commander's telescope. The tripod includes a spindle, a worm and a 
worm wheel mechanism, a ball and socket joint, and individually 
clamped legs. The spindle supports the instrument and is attached 
to the worm and worm wheel which is used for orientation. The ball 
and socket joint includes the ball at the end of the spindle, and two 
clamping nuts, one of which permits cross leveling and the other, 
circular oscillation. The tripod legs have clamping levers at the head 
for locking each leg to the head. At the foot of each leg is a steel 
point and footrest which facilitates embedding in the ground. 

(6) The carrying case (fig. 73) is provided for the instrument. 
The table of contents pasted in the cover also lists 1 plug in lamp 
and 4 lamps, a dry cell battery box, a dust brush, a cleaning cloth, 
and an impregnated cloth to be used for decontamination purposes. 

c. Operation. 

(I) To set up the instrument, clamp the tripod legs at the de- 
sired length and embed them firmly in the ground. Level the instru- 
ment, using the circular level and the ball and socket joint. Tighten 

W 



nw< hi. fli-win \i> Original from 

BigiitM Dy ^uu^K UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 

53 

GERMAN 105- MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 




Figure 71— Aiming Circle 
100 

2«l By Google UHlVEBrnfOTCAllFOBNW 



TM E9-325A 



FIRE CONTROL EQUIPMENT 



TRANSLATION 

LOS - LOOSE 
FEST * L 

OSTW. * EASTWARD 
WEST J. - WESTWARD 



PERISCOPE 



LAMP BRACKET -^J 



ANCLE OF SITE MOUNT 




ANCLE OF SITE 
_MICROMETEK 

ANCLE OF 
SITE SCALE 



AZIMUTH MICROMETER 

AZIMUTH MOUNT 

AZIMUTH THROWOUT 

LEVER 

ORIENTING KNOB 
NUT CLAMP 

CROSS LEVELING NUT 
NUT CLAMP 



MAGNETIC NEEDLE 
AZIMUTH 



AZIMUTH 

MICROMETER KNOB 

\TaZIMUTH MOUNT 
jCLAMP 



ROTATING 
/[MOT J ON NUT 



\ 
1 



[ ft A PO 55357 



Figure 72 — timing Circle — Close-up 

101 



Google 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 

53 

GERMAN 10S-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 



CARRYING CASE 




f 



W 

/w 




TRANSLATION 

VQR EIN^ETZEN DE5 RKR. 
MAGNET N A DEL FESTLAGENf 

BEFORE PACKING THE 
AIMING CIRCLE CLAMP 
JHE MAGNETIC NEEDLE 

AUS8LICK - CAUTION 

Tnhaltsverzeichnis 

J, I ST OF CONTENTS 

[KASTEN RKR 31 
[CHEST AIMING CIRCLE 31 

RICHTKREIS - 
1 AIMINGORCLE 
t - DECKUNGSPfEGEL- 
1 PERISCOPE 
T ANSTECKLAMPE - 
1 PLUG IN LAMP 
1 - BEBALTER FUR 
5TRQMQUELLE - 
1 BATTERY BOX 

KLARINOLTUCH IN 
TAG HE - 1 IMPREGNATED 
jILOTH 

% GLUHLAMPEN - 4 LAMPS 
3.5 V. 0.2 A. 
T PUTZTUCH - 
J CLEANING CLOTH 
Ipf STAUBPfNSEL • 
|Ll DUST BRUSH 




AZIMUTH MOUNT 



ANGLE OF SITE MOUNT 




PERISCOPE 



RA PD 55356 



Figure 73— Aiming Circle Components 

102 

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TM E9-325A 

53 

FIRE CONTROL EQUIPMENT 




Figure 74— Aiming Circle— Angle ef Site Mount 

the clamping nuts + Focus the telescope as required, using the sleeve 
on the eyepiece to set in the correction necessary for the observer's 
eye, 

(2) To orient the instrument, a datum point of known azimuth 
or a magnetic bearing may be used, 

(a) To orient on a datum point of known azimuth, set the main 
azimuth scale ( 100-mil intervals) and micrometer ( 1-mil intervals) 
to the azimuth of the datum point, and turn the orienting knob until 
the datum point appears on the vertical cross line of the reticle* The 
instrument may also be relocated on the tripod spindle, using the 
orienting clamping screw for large angular changes. The telescope 
may be elevated or depressed as required to center the point in the 
field of view. 

(b) To orient on magnetic north, set the main azimuth scale and 
micrometer to indicate zero. Press the plunger releasing the magnetic 
needle and turn one of the orienting knobs until the north-seeking end 
of the magnetic needle appears approximately opposite the "N n index 
at the front of the instrument, then refine the setting so that the south- 
seeking end of the needle is centered in the reticle. The instrument 
may also be relocated on the tripod spindle using the orienting clamp- 
ing screw for large angular changes. The aiming circle will then 
indicate magnetic azimuths. 

103 

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TM E9-325A 

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GERMAN 105- MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 

(c) To orient on grid north, proceed as for magnetic north T but 
set the azimuth to the magnetic declination of the locality (subtracting 
west declinations from 6,400 mils) instead of to zero. The instrument 
will then indicate grid azimuths, 

(d) When orientation by magnetic bearings has been completed, 
turn the knob to clamp the magnetic needle. 

(3) To read azimuth, bring the object on the vertical cross line 
of the reticle using the azimuth knob; the throwout lever may be de- 
pressed for making large azimuth changes rapidly. Azimuths from 
to 6,400 mils are read directly on the azimuth scale; the scale is 
graduated at 100 mil-intervals, and the micrometer is graduated at 
1-mil intervals. 

(4) To read angle of site, first make sure that with the telescope 
level bubble and the circle level bubble centered the angle of site 
scale and micrometer read normal. Then center the object in azimuth. 
Raise or depress the angle of site micrometer to center the object 
on the reticle cross lines and read the angle of site on the scale and 
micrometer 

(5) To prepare the instrument for traveling, place it in the carry- 
ing case provided. 

d. Tests and Adjustments* 

(1) The azimuth micrometers should read "0" when the azimuth 
scale indicates zero. The screw in the end of the azimuth micrometer 
may be temporarily loosened for this adjustment. 

(2) The telescope level should indicate the line of sight as de- 
termined by the center of the reticle to be horizontal This may be 
verified by sighting on a distant point at the same level as the tele- 
scope, the error, if any, being read on the reticle, No corrective 
adjustment by the using arms is permitted. 

(3) To check the accuracy of the declinator, it is necessary to set 
up the instrument in a position not subject to local magnetic attrac- 
tion, and sight on one or (preferably) more points of known azimuth. 
The average error should be noted and the necessary correction 
recorded. No adjustment by the using arms is permitted. 

54. ARTILLERY COMPUTER 34 (ART1LLERIE RECHEN- 
SCHIEBER 34). 

a. General, 

(1) The Artillerie Rechenschieber 34, sometimes called artillery 
computer; artillery slide rule; and artillery weather calculator are 

104 

rv 1 pw+i f rwinlf* Original From 

1 L UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 



FIRE CONTROL EQUIPMENT 

intended for use with the 105 -mm Light Field Howitzer IS with the 
following ammunition: 



RH, Gr, 38 Stg Feldhaubitae granate Field howitzer shell 

38 stahlguss 38 — cast steel 

und und and 

FJi. Gr. Feldhaubitze granate Field howitzer shell 

mit mit with 

AX 23V (0,25) Aufshlagz under Percussion fuze, 23, 

23 Verzogerung delay action (0.25 

(0,25) sec,) 

Dopp Z.S./60 Fl. Doppleziinder S/60 Combination fuze 

Fleihkraft S,60, centrifugal 

(2) The instrument mechanically calculates firing data from the 
metro message data. 

(3) In using the computer with American data the following 
points should be remembered 

(a) The German Wetter-Meldung differs from the American 
metro message in giving data in terms of time of flight rather than in 
zones of height. 

( b) The German values for wind bearing and gun target bearing 
are given in wind numbers, i.e., the azimuth scale is graduated in 32 
parts for a complete circle corresponding to the 32 points of the com- 
pass. Divide American mil values by 200 when setting them into the 
instrument. 

(c) The German wind velocity is given in meters per second. 
Multiply the American values in miles per hour by 0.447 to set meters 
per second into the instrument, 

(d) The German air density is given in kilograms per cubic meter. 
The American air density is expressed in percent of standard, or 
100 percent based at a sea level air density of 525*9 grains per cubic 
foot at 59 °F. This corresponds for standard air density to 1.203 kilo- 
grams per cubic meter. Conversion to air densities other than standard 
may be done by multiplying 1,203 by the percent of standard and 
dividing by 100, If air density values expressed in kilograms per 
cubic meter cannot be readily obtained, set the instrument to 1,20 
kilograms per cubic meter (the closest practical setting to the theoreti- 
cal value). 

(e) The German angle of site values include a correction for non- 
rigidity of trajectory. 

(f) The fuze setting values (Ziinderstellung in Grad vom Kreuz) 
obtained are the German arbitrary values graduated on the fuze setter 
time scale. 

105 

f^r^rtnL - Original from 

.-ailtawJ by V^UUglt UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 
M 

GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 




RA PD 81301 



Figure 75— Artillery Computer 34 (German}— Cose 

( g) Muzzle velocity corrections are normally carried on the shield 
of each piece with which this instrument may be used. 



b. Description, 



( 1 ) The instrument is carried and operated in its light aluminum 
carrying case. Its dimensions are approximately 19 inches x 8 inches 
x 3 inches, and its weight is approximately 15 pounds complete. 

(2) It includes a range scale with pointer; correction disks on 
which are set off, in turn, wind velocity and direction, and gun target 
direction; and mechanisms correcting for air density, weight of 
projectile, muzzle velocity, and powder temperature. The disks are 
linked so that the corrections are accumulated and give a lateral cor- 
rection for cross wind and a corrected range. In the cover of the case 
are curves and scales for determination of charge, angle of site, time 
of flight in seconds, and fuze setting. 

(3) The data set into the computer includes: 

(a) Metro message. 

Wind velocity (meters per second). 
Direction of wind* 

Density of air (kilograms per cubic meter) for prevailing tempera- 
ture and barometric pressure. 

(b) Temperature of powder (Celsiusgrad (same as degrees 
Centigrade)), 

(c) Weight of projectile (zones). 

(d) Correction for change of muzzle velocity. 

(e) Measured range (map ranges in kilometers). 

(f) Gun target direction, 

(g) Difference in height between gun and target (meters). 

104 



IV- 



Oriqinal fiwn 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 




A — WIND COMPONENT RANGE DRUM 

tt 1 AIR DENSITY CORRECTION MECHANISM 

I AND RANGE DRUM 
- , PROJECTILE WEIGHT CORRECTION MECHANISM 
fc ^|AND RANGE DRUM 

D — MUZZLE VELOCITY CORRECTION SCALE AND INDEX 
, i POWDER TEMPERATURE CORRECTION MECHANISM 

1 AND RANGE. DRUM 
F — RANGE CORRECTION KNOB 

C— LATERAL CORRECTION SCALE (f-OR CROSS MND) 

H_ RANGE CORRECTION INDEX 

J — RANGE CORRECTION SCALE 

K— CORRECTED RANGE SCALE 

L —MAP RANGE SCALE 

M — RANGE DRUM {LATERAL CORRECTION) 

H — TANGENT ELEVATION SCALES 

P — AIR DENSITY CORRECTION TABLE 

Q — FLASH REDUCER TABLE 

r— METRO MESSAGE TABLE 

S— FUZE SETTING SCALE 

T — -ANGLE OF SITE CURVES (FOR EACH CHARGE) 

U — GUN -TARGET HEIGHT SCALE 

V — RANGE SCALES 

W — TIME OF FLIGHT SCALES 

X — FUZE SETTING SCALE 

Y— WIND COMPONENT KNOB 

I— WIND VELOCITY SCALE 

AA— CLAMP 

«l— GUN-TARGET BEARING INDEX 

CC — WIND BEARING INDEX 

DD SHOES RA PD«1J02 



Figure 76—Artllhry Computer 24 t German I— Arrangemmnt 



TM E9-325A 
54 

GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 

(4) The instrument contains the following tables and mecha- 
nisms: 

(a) Metro message table: containing columns for day, month, 
hour, and height of plane of metro message, 

(b) Air density correction table; correction between firing point 
and metro station. 

(c) Time of flight, and fuze setting and angle of sight charts. 

(d) Powder temperature correction mechanism. 

(e) Muzzle velocity correction mechanism. 

(f) Projectile weight correction mechanism, 

(g) Air density correction mechanism. 

(h) Wind component mechanism. 

(5) The following data is obtained from the instrument: 

(a) Lateral correction for cross wind in mils. 

( b ) Corrected range in kilometers, 

(c ) Amount of range corrected in kilometers, 

(d) Corrected tangent elevation. 

(e) Corrected angle of site in mils. 

(f) Fuze setting in degrees from the cross or safe setting, 

(6) Time of flight in seconds. 

Operation — Settings* 

( 1 ) Metro Message. 

(a) On the metro message table, use a soft lead pencil or crayon 
to fill in the columns marked: 

Tag — day, 

Monat — month. 

Uhr — hour. 

Hohe (Dm) — height in decimeters. 

Ball. Luftgew. i. Desrim. kg/cbrrv — ballistic air density in kilo- 
grams/cu. meter. 

Ball. — wind. 

Richtg. Windz. — wind figures (direction of wind). 
Geschw, m/s — velocity meters/sec, 

(b) In noting the data in the column headed "Richtg. Windz." 
the values noted (wind numbers) represent intervals of 200 mils, to 
match the wind component disk which has 32 graduations in 360 
degrees. Hence, the number "2" would mean 400 mils, 

(2) Air Density Correction. 

108 



Oriqinal from 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 




TIME Of FLIGHT( FtafMrt 



(SECONDS* j 



BALLISTIC AIR 
DENSITY 
KILOGRAMS PER 
CUBIC METER J 



10 

2: 



25 



40 



BO 



lilL-Wlnl 
Win i;. 




HEIGHT 
HOUR {TIME) 

VELOCITY OF WIND 

\ DIRECTION OF WIND 
J(IN WIND FIGURES) 




CORRECTION OF 
AIR DENSITY FOR 
.DIFFERENCE JN 
ALTITUDE: FlRJNG 
POSITION^HBGHT 
OF METRO STATION 



fltflin#ryn| 

tit Lvfri»iuti 
' tlr Hlltnunlirnliliri: 
Fiuirttf llitfif - 
HShinU|t 4v 
W«lt«rmtldung 



FlRJNG POSITION 
HIGHER 
LOWER 



>N| 



AIR DENSITY 
LESS - ; MORE + 
KILOGRAMS/ 
CU METER 



FiBtr- 
stel lung 
hthtr + 
tiifir - 



±100 



lift* 

gtricht: 
fcltlntr- 



irliitf + 



Kirtuteh 



± 150 Z 0,02 





FLASH REDUCER TABLE 



j MUZZLE VELOCITY 
(CORRECTION 

CHARGE OR ZONE 



l.r.H.ii 



RA PD 31 745 



FJfvr* 77— Artillery Comp«f*r 34 IGtrmonJ— Metro MtiMf* 

Tobf« 



UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-32SA 
54 

GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 

(a) At the bottom of the metro message platen is a two-columned 
table headed: 

"Verbesserung des Luftgewichts fur Hohenunterschied; 
Feurstellung — Hohenlage der Wettermeldung" 

Translated, this becomes; 

Correction of air density for difference in altitude: 
Firing position — height of metro station 

(b) The columns are headed: 

1 ' Fvw rtt* || HUB ' ' Luf Q4 wfchf 

. — t- t ■ v n h ■ ^ — ■ 

hoher +, tiefer — ,m" kleiner — , grossert +., kg/cbm" 

Translated, these become: 

Firing ro*!tion Air Guilty 

higher +, lower — t meters less — , more \ , kilograms/cubic 

meter 

(c) This correction is added to the air density value obtained 
from the metro station. 

(3) Correction for Flash Reducer. Next to the air density 
correction table is a table headed : 



Stufen — Andg" Charge or Muzzle velocity 

zone correction 

If flash reducer is used, the necessary correction should be noted. 

(4) Range Drums, Scale and Indexes. 

(a) Set each of the 5 -range drums to the charge selected, and 
set the index for each drum on the measured range. 

(b) Set the measured (map) range in on the scale marked 
"Gemessene E. in km," 

(5) Wind Component Setting. 

(a) On the scale marked "Wind — Geschw, m/s t " set the index to 
the ballistic wind velocity noted in the "Geschw. m/s" column. 

(b) Set the red arrow to the bearing in wind number of the 
ballistic wind noted in the ^Richtg, Wind?." Column and clamp the 
knurled handle. 

(c) Turn the wind component knob to set the target bearing 
in wind number against the index marked "Sch. — R" (Schiess — 
Richtung). 

(6) Correction for Powder Temperature. Loosen the 
knurled clamping nut and set the knife edge of the mechanism labeled 
"P. Temp. Cels/ T (Pulver Temperatur Celsiusgrad or powder tem- 
perature, Centigrade) to that point on the chart corresponding to 
the type of powder and to the temperature. The chart has black lines 
for diglycol propellant, and red lines for neuglycol propellant The 

110 



.^*,f"rw*rili* Original from 

,tid by t^UUgll UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



Figure 76— ArtiUery Computer 14 fGermaitJ— Range Drum* and Measured Range Scale 



TM E9-325A 
54 

GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 

radial Hne* represent degrees Centigrade, and the red radial line 
(10°C) is the standard setting. Reclamp the nut 

(7) Correction for Projectile Weight* Loosen the knurled 
clamping nut and set the index marked "Gesch. — Gew" (projectile 
weight) to the zone corresponding to that zone marked on the 
projectile. Zone III is the standard weight. Reclamp the nut 

(8) Basic Step Correction (Muzzle Velocity Correction.) 

(a) The "Grund — Stufe* or howitzer correction mechanism is pro- 
vided for correction for variation from the standard muzzle velocity. 

(b) German guns are calibrated by measuring the remaining 
velocity at 50 meters (55 yards) from the muzzle. Range tables give, 
for each charge, the increment to be added to obtain the correspond- 
ing muzzle velocity. 

(c) The "Grundstufen Tafel" (howitzer correction table) marked 
on the shield of the weapon gives the correction to be added for each 
charge and range. Set the stop to give this correction. If minus cor- 
rections are necessary, these may be set in as a last step, as noted in 
subparagraph d (2), below, when making the final setting. 

(9) Air Density Correction. On the "Luft-Gewicht" (air 
density) mechanism, set the ratchet index to the air density value 




DiQrtizfctf by Google 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



FIRE CONTROL EQUIPMENT 



TM E9-325A 

54 




RA FD 81306 



Figure 80 — ArtUfory Computer 34 I German J — Powder 

Temperature Correction 

obtained from the metro table by addition of the air density value 
at the metro station and the air density correction required for 
difference in height between firing position and metro station. 



(1) Lateral Correction. Push the lateral correction range 
drum until its shoe bears against the clamp of the wind component 
indicator. Read off on the scale associated with the pointer "Seiten- 
Verbesserung* (lateral correction) the necessary correction in mils 
I or cross wind, 

(2) Corrected Range, Turn the range correction knob at the 
left of the instrument until all the correction mechanisms have been 
moved to the right as far as their settings permit. (If a plus correc- 
tion on the **Grund-Stufe" mechanism is necessary, turn the 1 
all the way, then back until the "Grund-Stufe" index reads the 
quired value). Read the corrected range on the scale marked 
"Verbesserte E. in km 1 * (corrected range in kilometers), 

(3) Correction of Range. The amount of range corrected is 
indicated on the unnamed scale just below the corrected range 



1T3 



Original From 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 

54 



GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 




RA PO 11107 

figure 81— 7 OS- mm Howjfi«r f Sermon I— Vl*w of Corrosion 

Tobfe on Shield 



114 

. ^ u tf~*rw\rili> Original from 

lized by ^UUglL UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 

54 



FIRE CONTROL EQUIPMENT 



.> MUZZLE VELOCITY 
CORRECTION SCALE 



10 IT 12 13 




RA FD 11308 



Figure 92— Artillery Computer 34 (German) — Correction 

scale which is graduated from plus 4 kilometers to minus 4 kilometers. 
The index for this scale is mounted on the tc P. Temp. Cels." mechanism. 

(4) Tangent Elevation. Read off the tangent elevation indi- 
cated by the index marked "Verb. Erhg " on the drum marked ''Verb, 
Erbohung in Strich" (tangent elevation in mils), 

(5) Ancle of Site. 

(a) The angle of site set on German guns is a "total" angle 
of site which includes map angle of site plus a correction for non- 
rigidity of trajectory. It is set in mils. 

( b) Set the corrected range in on the range scale for the particu- 
lar chart, in the cover, which corresponds to the charge used. The 
scale is marked "Entfernung in km." (range in km), 

( c) Set difference in height between gun and target, as obtained 
from map, on the scale "Hohenunterschied Gesh. — Ziel nT (difference 
in height between gun and target in meters). Read the "total" angle 
of sight in mils from the curve picked out by the sliding pointer. 

115 



Oriqinal fiwn 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-32SA 
$4 

GERMAN 105- MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 




dtyutea by GoO^IC 



QriQinal from 
UHIVI'RSITV OF CALIFORNI* 



TM E9-325A 

54 

FIRE CONTROL EQUIPMENT 

(6) Fuze Setting. This value may be read off directly on the 
scale in the cover marked "Ziinderstellung in Grad vom Kreuz" (fuze 
setting in degrees from the index cross). 

e. Example. 

(1) Problem. 

Map range — 4,000 meters. 
Direction of fire — 2,000 mils. 

Difference in altitude between gun and target — 52 meters. 

Metro datum plane and gun — same elevation. 

Direction of wind — 100 mils* 

Velocity of wind — 10 meters per second* 

Air density — 1.30 kg/cbm. 

Shell weight — zone IL 

Powder temperature — (Diglycol + 40°C). 
Flash reducer correction — none- 

Charge — 4 (may be obtained from table painted on gun shield). 

(2) Solution, 

(a) Set the five range drums to charge 4, and set the index of 
each range drum to 4 km (A, fig. 84). Set 4 km in on the scale 
marked "Gemessene E. in km." (B p fig, 84). 

(b) Set the red arrow of inner circle to 0.5 (direction of wind 
(100 mils), expressed in increments of 200 mils, equals 0.5) (C, fig. 
84). Set wind velocity of 10 meters per second in on the scale 
marked "Wind-Geschw. m/s. Clamp (D, fig, 84). Set the index 
marked "Sch. -R" to 10 (direction of fire (2,000 mils), expressed in 
increments of 200 mils, equals 10) (E, fig. 84). 

(c) Set the knife edge of the *T, Temp. Cels." mechanism to 
the intersection of the red charge 4 (Diglycol) line and the + 40°C 
line (F f fig. 84). Then clamp, 

fd) Set the index marked "Gesch -Gew." to zone II and clamp 
(G, fig, 84), 

(c) Set the stop for the ^rund-Stufe" mechanism to "0" (H, fig, 
84). NOTE: If a flash reducer is used, a correction to the muzzle 
velocity will be necessary. The stop for the "Grund-Stufe" mechanism 
is then set to the "Stufen-Andg" corresponding to the "Ldg." (charge) 
shown in the chart in figure 75, An additional correction may be 
necessary if the bore of the howitzer is worn. Values for this correc- 
tion for various ranges are tabulated in the chart in figure 81. 

(I) Set the ratchet of the "Luft-Gewicht" mechanism to "1.30 
kg/cbm'* (I, fig. 84), 

(&) Turn knob (J, fig- 84) at left of instrument to push 
mechanisms as far to right as permitted by settings. Push the lateral 

117 



Oriqinal from 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 




Flgur* t4~AriM%ry Cemptftor 34 f German*— Probton Setting ( 



TM E9-325A 

54-55 

FIRE CONTROL EQUIPMENT 

deflection drum (K, fig. 84) (adjacent to wind component mech- 
anism) until its shoe bears against the wind component clamp (L t 
fig. 84). 

(h) Read off the following results: 
"Seiten-Verbesserung" (lateral correction for cross wind) (M T 

J ■■■■>.^.i.i, IIIIJd . a ...L l . > . lll i JK .......L. IJ . J ....... B r ll i. ll . a I 1 ixii 1 s 

"Verbesserte E. in Km" (corrected range) (N p fig. 84) 3.840 km 

Verb* Erhohung in Strich" (tangent elevation) (O, fig. 84) 226 mils 
Unmarked scale {amount range corrected) (P, fig* 84).... + 0.156 km 

(i) Set the sliding index in the cover to 3.840 km on the scale 
(1 Entfernung in km" for charge 4 (A, fig. 85). 

(}) Set the sliding index to 52m on the scale "Hohenunterschied 
Gesh-Ziel m." (B, fig. 85), 

(k) Read the following values: 

"Flugzeit in s. w (time of flight) (C, fig. 85) .13.8 sec 

Ziinderstellung in Grad vom Kreuz" (fuze setting in degrees from 

index cross) (D, fig. 85) ■ ■ ■ > ■ > . ■ ■ r i ■ . . 91 

Unnamed numbered curves (angle of site, including correction 
for nonrigidity of trajectory) (E, fig. 85) 315 mils 

f* Preparation for Travel* Make sure that all clamping knobs 
are secure. Close the case. 

g. Care and Preservation. 

(1) Normally no lubrication is necessary. 

(2) The instrument should be kept closed at all times when not 
in use. 

(3) The instrument should be kept clean and free of dust and 
dirt or sand. It should not be operated, if sand or dirt is found, until 
after being thoroughly cleaned. 

(4) Care should be taken to avoid marring or scratching the 
scales and drums. 

(5) Knobs and slides should not be forced. If binding occurs, 
clean the binding parts. If parts are damaged, notify Ordnance 
personnel, 

55. FINDER, RANGE, 34 (Em 34), 
a. General, 

(1) The Range Finder 34 ( Entf ernungsmesser 34) is used for 
measuring ranges of land or aerial targets. Range readings are 
obtained in meters and are visible in the field of view. American 
range finders are calibrated in yards. 

(2) The range finder is furnished with a shoulder harness (at 
least two types of which are known), tripod, and an adjusting 
lath (Justierlatte 0.70m) with carrying case. 



Oriqinal from 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 

55 

GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 




Figure 95 — Artillery Computer 14 (German J — Problem Setting* 

b. Description* 

(1) The instrument is a coincidence-type range finder having 
the following characteristics: 

Base length 70 centimeters 



Range 200 to 10,000 meters (219 to 10,936 yards) 

Width of field of view at 1,000 meters 62 meters (67.75 yards) 

Weight of range finder „ r<T , , 10 pounds 

(2) The range finder has an insert-type field of view, and a 
range scale also visible in the field of view (fig. 87), 

120 

Original From 

Dlgili*** b * ^ uu cV L UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 

55 

FIRE CONTROL EQUIPMENT 




Figure 06— flange Ffoder 34 With Harness 



(3) The eyepiece has a diopter scale for adjustment for the 
observer's eye* The open sight, close to the eyepiece, facilitates the 
rapid picking up of the target. The end box sleeves (fig, 88) may 
be rotated to cover the end windows for travel or storage. The 
range knob, when rotated, simultaneously brings the images into 
coincidence and rotates the range scale. 

(4) The coincidence correction or range correction knob or 
roller {Berichtigung der Entfernung) is covered by a revolving pro- 
tecting ring. The halving correction knob or roller (Berichtigung 
der Hohe) is covered by the same ring. The lock screw marked 
"Sperren* (locked) permits access only to the halving correction 
knob. The amount of range correction set in is visible in the win- 
dow labeled "Entfernungsuerrichtigung" (range correction). 

(5) The eyepiece cap and the buffers protect the instrument 
in use and in travel The carrying strap facilitates carrying. 

(6) The shoulder harness shown in figures 86 and 89 is normally 
worn with the pouch on the back, out of the way, although the 
harness may be readily assembled for use with the pouch on the 
cheat The harness is disassembled and placed in the pouch for 

121 



Digitize by CiOOgle 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 



GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 



INVERTED IMAGE 
INSERT 




A -RANGE FINDER NOT FOCUSED ON TARGET 




8- RANGE FINDER FOCUSED ON TARGET *a pd tun 

Figure 07— Rouge Finder 34 — Field of View 

122 



i till 



Original from 
UMlVFfiSITV Of CALIFORNIA 



o 

z 



-. 3 
-n £. 

O 



EYEPIECE 
OPEN SIGHT 



DIOPTER SCALE 



RANGE CORRECTION SCALE 




HALVING ADJUSTMENT KNOB 
RANGE CORRECTION KNOB 
« BOTH UNDER COVER) 




RANGE KNOB ' 
TRANSLATION 



BOX SLEEVE 



EM 34 IENTERNUNGMESSERI RANGE FINDER 34 
ENTFERNUNGSBERJCHTIGUNG RANGE CORRECTION 
VERGR - MX - MAGNIFICATION MX 
SPERREN - SHUT 

NUR IN STFLLUNG "ZU" SPERREN U OFFEN - 
LOCK ONLY i WHEN IN THE "ZU" POSITION 



BEfUCHTJ GUNG DER HOHE ADJUST FOR HEIGHT 

BERICHTIGUNC DER ENTFERNUNG - ADJUST FOR RANGE 

GEBR WICHMANN M B H . - WICHMANN BROS, LTD. . 

ENTERNUNGN -TEILUNG IM EINBLICK ABLESEN - 
RANGE 5CALE - READ OFF IN EYEPIECE 



RA FD JI746 



Figvr* H— flange Finder 34— Autmbfed Vftws 



5 



3 



3 

i 

w 
Kl 
Cfi 

► 



TM E9-325A 



GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 



SPRING 




Figure 



Finder 34— ffemeti 
124 



Original from 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 




125 

* • I Original ffofn 

:<! d by CiOOglC UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 

55 

GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 

travel. Another type of harness sometimes furnished, makes use of 
a tripod held on a chest pad for sighting by an observer who may 
be erect, sitting, or kneeling. 

(7) A tripod is furnished for ranging by a prone observer, and 
has a socket and clamp for engaging the ball-shaped bearing at the 
center of the range finder. 

(8) The lath ( Justierlatte 0.70 cm) has a small elbow telescope 
built into the center for alining the lath with the range finder, and 
folding adjustable legs for setting up, A case is provided for carry- 
ing (fig. 90). 

c Operation. 

( 1 ) To set up the instrument, adjust the harness on the observer 
(fig. 86). The carrying pouch should hang on the back, and the 
spring-mounted holders for the range finder should extend in front 
of the observer. Carefully place the range finder in the holders, 
and in line with the eye of the observer. 

(2) Focus the eyepiece by rotating the diopter scale to produce 
a sharp image. If the operator knows the value for his own eye, 
the setting may be made directly on the scale. 

(3) To measure the range of the target, aline the instrument 
on the target, using the open sight. Select a clearly defined part, 
perpendicular, if possible, to the halving line. Center the target in 
the field of view. Turn the range knob until the images of the 
target appear in coincidence. Head the range value centered in the 
field of view. 

(4) To prepare the instrument for traveling, remove the in- 
strument from the harness, close the end box covers, and cover 
the eyepiece. Disassemble the harness and put it in the carrying 
pouch. 

d. Tests and Adjustments. 

(1) Halving Adjustment, Incorrect adjustment of the halving 
line is indicated by the failure of the corresponding points on the 
inverted and erect images to fall on the halving line- To correct 
the halving, slide back the cover to index the arrow adjacent to 
"Berichtigung der Hbhe," and turn the exposed roller or knob until 
the corresponding point of each image touches the halving lines, as 
in figure 91, A sharply defined point at least 200 meters (220 yards) 
away must be used for this adjustment. Return the cover to its 
original position when the adjustment is completed, to guard against 
accidental turning of the roller or knobs. The inverted image will, 
of course, not be as complete as the inverted images shown in fig- 
ure 91, since the insert permits visibility of only a small portion of 
the inverted image, 

126 

rv '*l™iu Cr\f\n\i> Original from 

DigiUzed by ^UOgK UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 
55 

FIRE CONTROL EQUIPMENT 




RA PO 31747 

Figure 97— Fields of View 




® 

RA PD 3174S 

figure 92— Views When Using Jdfusting Loth 

(2) Range Adjustment — Distant Target Method. Select a 
sharply defined object at least 200 meters (220 yards) away, the 
range of which is accurately known, and bring the object into coinci- 
dence (®, fig. 91). If the range scale agrees with the known range, 
the instrument is in adjustment. If adjustment is required, turn the 
lock screw in the direction marked "Sperren" and aline the arrow 
adjacent to "Berichtigung der Entfernung/' on the protecting cover, 
thus exposing the range correction knob or roller. Turn the knob 
to obtain coincidence then cover and lock. 

127 



Oriqinal from 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 

55-57 

GERMAN 105- MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 

(3) Range Adjustment — Infinity Method, To test the in- 
strument by the infinity method, set up the adjusting lath ( Justierlatte 
0,70 cm) belonging to the instrument in a horizontal position at least 
110 meters (125 yards) from the instrument, An American adjusting 
lath bears the same serial number as the range finder with which 
it is to be used. Make sure that the lath is perpendicular to the line 
of sight from the range finder by sighting on the range finder with 
the elbow telescope built into the lath. Set the range scale to the 
infinity position, If the images appear alined (® T fig. 92), the 
instrument is adjusted. If the images appear as in ® , figure 92, the 
following adjustment is required. Turn the lock screw in the direc- 
tion marked "Sperren" and aline the arrow adjacent to "Berichtigung 
der Entfernung" on the protecting cover, thus exposing the range cor- 
rection knob. Turn the knob until the images appear as in ®, figure 
92, then cover and lock. 



( 1 ) Refer to paragraph 60 on general instructions pertaining to 
the care and preservation of instruments. 

(2) Keep the end box sleeves closed and eyepiece covered when 
the instrument is not in use, 

(3) When the instrument is to be carried for long distance, or 
is to be stored, disassemble the harness, clean it, and stow it in the 
pouch. 

(4) Keep the adjusting lath in its carrying case when not in use, 

56* SURVEYING ROD. 

a. A 3-meter surveying rod (fig. 93), graduated in 1-centimeter 
divisions, is provided for orientation of the battery. The rod is hinged 
to reduce its length to about three-quarters of a meter for storage 
and travel. The folded rod is carried in a canvas case fitted with a 
sling strap. 

57. PLOTTING RULES. 

a. Three rules are furnished as plotting board accessories. 

b. One steel rule (fig, 94) bears a linear scale, graduated from 
to 14 kilometers in 5 -meter intervals, and a quadrant, graduated 
from minus 800 mils to plus 800 mils in 50-mil intervals. At the 
zero end is a center for pivoting. This rule may be used for plotting 
azimuth and range values on a topographic map with a scale of 
1 1 25,000. 

c. The steel protractor is graduated from minus 500 mils to plus 
500 mils in 2 -mil intervals. The radius of curvature is 480 millimeters. 
Two points permit pinning the protractor to a board. 

128 



>.i ,^*,t~ruMlli> Original from 

igjtirtd by VjlHJgIL UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 




ffgur* 93— Swmylnq Kod end Carrying Cqt* 




NOTE: SCALI U&ED IS 1' 25,000 JU K> 5114* 



Figure 94— Plotting Rutes 



TM E9-32SA 



HANDLE 



FIRE CONTROL EQUIPMENT 



FIXED LUC 




INDEX 



TRANSLATION 

STELLUNG- POSITION 



Figure 



RA PO S53*4 



d. The other steel rule bears a linear scale, graduated from 
to 14 f 600 meters in 50-meter intervals, and a center at the zero end. 
At about 11300 meters is a raised section. When this rule is set up 
with the protractor on a deflection chart, the raised section clears 
the protractor. The rule and protractor are used for plotting deflec- 
tions on a chart with a scale of 1:25,000, 



58. FUZE SETTER, 
a. Description. 

(1) The fuze setter (figs. 95 and 96) is used by the gunner for 
setting the time fuze. The leather covered handle can be folded back 
for storage. 

(2) The principal parts of the fuze setter are an upper rotating 
section which contains a fixed lug, and a lower section which contains 
a movable spring-loaded plunger lug. The lower section is graduated 
from 15 to 350 degrees. 



131 



vf Google 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 

58-59 

GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 




■A VP S53A7 



Flgurt 96 — Fw* Setter — ietfem 

b. Operation. Make the desired setting and clamp the two 
sections together, the fuze setter being carefully positioned on the fuze 
so that the fixed lug engages with the fuze. This forces the spring- 
loaded lug back into its recess, The fuze setter is then rotated in the 
direction indicated by the arrow until the plunger lug snaps into place. 
Lift off the fuze setter without further rotation. 



59. BATTERY COMMANDER'S TELESCOPE, 
a. Description. 

(1) The battery commander's telescope (figs. 97 and 98) is a 
O-power, binocular instrument used for observation and for meas- 
uring azimuths and angles of site. The instrument consists of a tele- 
scope and an azimuth mount, tripod, carrying case, and accessories. 
The tripod includes an orienting mount. A trench mount is furnished, 
which can be embedded in the ground or in wood, for use in place 
of the tripod. 

(2) The telescope may be positioned vertically (fig. 97), or it 
may be swung horizontally (fig, 99) to increase the stereoscopic 

132 

f^rwifllR Original From 

Difli!i«xJ by ^UUV^lt UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 

59 

FIRE CONTROL EQUIPMENT 

effect. The recticle, which remains erect in any position of the tele- 
scope arms, is illuminated by the removable lamp on the slide near 
the reticle, 

b. Operation. 

(1) To set the instrument, clamp the tripod legs at the desired 
length, embed them firmly in the ground, and tighten the leg clamps 
(fig. 100). Using the spring plunger, clamp the telescope on the 
vertical spindle extending from the orienting mount. (The tripod has 
a mount which permits cross leveling and orienting,) Level the mount 
by centering the bubble in the circular level (fig. 101). When the 
bubble is centered, clamp the balt-and-socket joint on the lower mount, 

(2) To prepare the telescope, release the telescope clamping 
knob (fig. 97), and turn the telescope elbows to the vertical or 
horizontal position, as required. Set the proper interpupillary distance 
on the interpupillary scale (fig. 98), graduated from 55 to 75 milli- 
meters, and clamp the interpupillary wing knob. If the interpupillary 
distance for the observer is not known, it may be found by observing 
the sky, and moving the eyepiece apart or together, until the field of 
view changes from two circles, or two overlapping circles, to one 
sharply defined circle. The interpupillary wing knob is then clamped. 
Focus each eyepiece independently by covering one of them and 
looking through the telescope with both eyes open at an object sev- 
eral hundred yards away; turn the diopter scale until the object ob- 
served appears sharply defined. The diopter scale on each eyepiece 
permits immediate adjustment for each eye if the observer knows 
his own eye corrections. If required, place the light or dark filters 
over the eyepiece, and the metal sun shades over the objective lenses. 
Tubular sections, about 8 inches long, can be attached to the sun 
shades for protection against rain. 

(3) To orient the instrument, select a datum point of known 
azimuth, and set this value of the azimuth scale (IQO-mil steps) and 
micrometer (l^mil steps). The throwout lever may be used for 
making large changes in azimuth rapidly. Turn the telescope with 
the orienting knob until the datum point appears at the center of 
the reticle of the right-hand telescope. The orienting clamping knob 
may be temporarily released for making large angular changes rapidly. 
Thereafter, use only the azimuth knob, or, for large changes, the 
azimuth throwout lever, and the correct azimuth of the point observed 
will be indicated. For azimuths in the 3,200- to 6,400-mil region, 
additional numbers (0 to 3,200 mils) are provided, corresponding to 
the azimuth scale on the panoramic telescope. 

(4) Direct the telescope on the object, and rotate the elevating 
knob until the object appears at the center of the reticle, Center the 
angle of site level bubble by adjusting the angle of site knob. The 

133 

rv 1 pw+i f~""nnnlp Original From 

1 ^ UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 

GERMAN 1Q5-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 



TELESCOPE! 
CLAMPING 
KNOB 



TRENCH \/ 
MOUNT} 




B.C. TELESCOPE 



INTERPUP I LLAfcY CLAMP KNOB 



TRANSLATION 

S,F> - B,C TELESCOPE, SCISSOR TYPE 

ME&KREIS - MOUNT, ON TRFPQD 

ElNGELENKBAUMSCHRAUBE - AZIMUTH 
MOUNT 

REGEN5CHUTZOHRE -1 RAIN PROTECTOR 
TUBES 

1 BEH ALTER FljR 5TROMQUELLE - CONTAFMER 
FOR BATTERY 
HANIXAMPE ■ HAND LAMP 
AN STECKLAMPE - PLUG IN LAMP 
VFRTEILER, ZWf lf ACH - DOUBLE DISTRIBUTOR 

GLUHBIRNEN 3.5V \Z. VORRATI -4 BULBS 
3 5V. 

AUGENMUSCHEL fZ. VOARATi - EYE GUARD 
BLENDGLASER, HELL - 2 FfLTERS, LIGHT 

2 BLENDGLASER, DUNKEL - 2 FILTERS. DARK 

1 PUTZUCH - CLEANING CLOTH 

I STAUBPINSEL - DUST BRUSH 

? ICLARIMOLTUCH IN TASCHE - IMPREGNATED 
CLOTH IN PACKET 

B.C TELESCOPE 
CARRYING CASE 



RA PD 31694 



Figure 97 — Battery Commander's Telescope Wlffc Ca*e 

134 

■ • ui f.""*r\rtnltf> Original from 

:.zed by VjUU*£1C UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9- 

59 



FIRE CONTROL EQUIPMENT 



DIOPTER SCALE 
EYEPIECE 




i -i — — l — 1 - 4- -1^+^ 



LOCKING PLUNGER 



AZIMUTH SCALE 



NOTATION CARD 

ORIENTING KNOB 
fOF TRIPOD) 

NUT CLAMP 



LEG CLAMP 




*- — RETICLE PATTERN 



-ORIENTING KNOB 
IOF AZIMUTH MOUNT) 



AZIMUTH MOUNT CLAMP 

CROSS LEVELING NUT 
ROTATING MOTION NUT 

NUT CLAMP 



HA PD S53M 



Figure 98 — Sotfery Commander's TeJeicope— Ctase-up 



135 



Oriainal from 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 

GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 

RETICLE LAMP BRACKET 




Figure 99— Battery Commander'* Telescope — Inter pupillary 
Scale and Angle of Site Mechanism 



angle of site is then read on the angle of site scale, which is graduated 
in mils. An indication of "300" corresponds to a horizontal line of 
sight. CAUTION; Always release the telescope knob before rotating 
the telescopes in a vertical plane. Failure to do this may result in 
damage to the instrument and cause double vision. 

(5) The reticle (fig. 98), located in the right eyepiece, is a grid, 
the horizontal and vertical axis of which are graduated in 10-mil 
intervals. 

(6) The throwout mechanism is provided for rapidly traversing 
the telescope. A circular level is provided for leveling the head. The 
traversing head is graduated from to 64 in 100-mtl divisions, with 
a micrometer adjustment from to 100 in 1-mil divisions. 

(7) To prepare the instrument for traveling, remove the sun 
shades and filters, if used. With the telescope shanks in a vertical 
position, disengage the telescope from the mount. Loosen the tele- 

136 

f~*" -\i \()|f> Original From 

Digged bf V.ilHJ£lt UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9 -325A 



FIRE CONTROL EQUIPMENT 



NUT CLAMP 



ORIENTING KN06 




LEVELING NUT 

ROTATING MOTION NUT 

ami- 



NUT CLAMP 



PA PO 55172 



Figure 100 — Battery Commander's T«f*«cope oitd Aiming 

Circle— Tripod Htad 



137 



Oriqinal frofn 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 

GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 

- 

AZIMUTH MICROMETER 



CIRCULAR LEVEL 



THRQWOUT 
LfVER 



AZIMUTH i 
SCALE JN \ 




A^ I MUTH 
MICROMETER 
KN08 



ORIENTrNG 
KNOfi 



U PC 5S171 

Figure 101— Battery Commander'* Telescope — Aiimvih Mount 

scope clamping knob, and place the telescope shafts in a vertical 
Place the instrument in the wooden carrying case. 





■■■■ 






3 



(1) The azimuth micrometer and azimuth scale should read "0" 
simultaneously. The screw in the end of the micrometer may be 
temoorarilv loosened to r>erm it adjustment. 

(2) The angle of site mechanism may be checked by observing 
a datum point of known angle site. Small errors may be corrected by 
temporarily loosening the screw in the end of the knob, and slipping 
the micrometer and knob to the correct position. Should the angle 

138 



Original From" 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



59-60 

FIRE CONTROL EQUIPMENT 

of site scale and micrometer then fail to indicate "300" and "0" re- 
spectively, the instrument should be turned in for adjustment by 
authorized Ordnance personnel. 

60. CARE AND PRESERVATION, 
a* General* 

(1) The instructions given here supplement instructions pertain- 
ing to individual instruments included in preceding paragraphs. 

(2) Fire control and sighting instruments are t in general, rugged 
and suited for the purpose for which they have been designed. They 
will not, however, stand rough handling or abuse, and inaccuracy or 
malfunctioning may result from such mistreatment. 

(3) Unnecessary turning of screws or other parts not incident to 
the use of the instrument is expressly forbidden. 

(4) Keep the instruments as dry as possible. Do not put an 
instrument in its carrying case when wet. 

(5) When not in use, keep the instruments in the carrying cases 
provided, or in the condition indicated for traveling. Box sleeves on 
optical instruments should be closed, and eyepieces covered. 

(6) The maintenance duties described are those for which tools 
and parts have been provided the using arm personnel. Other replace- 
ments and repairs are the responsibility of maintenance personnel, 
but may be performed by the using arm personnel, when circum- 
stances permit, within the discretion of the pertinent Ordnance officer. 

(7) No painting of fire control or sighting equipment by the using 
arms is permitted. 

(8) Many worm drives have throwout mechanisms to permit 
rapid motion through large angles. When using these mechanisms, it 
is essential that the throwout lever be fully depressed to prevent 
injury to the worm and gear teeth* 

(9) When using a tripod with adjustable legs T be certain that the 
legs are clamped tightly to prevent possibility of collapse. 

(10) When setting up tripods on sloping terrain, place two legs 
on the downhill side to provide maximum stability. 

(11) Dry-cell batteries should not be kept in the battery boxes 
when the instrument is not in use. Dry-cell batteries when weak 
deteriorate rapidly, and will cause corrosion and other damage to 
containers, 

b. Optical Parts. 

( 1 ) To obtain satisfactory vision, it is necessary that the exposed 
surfaces of the lenses and other parts be kept clean and dry. Cor- 

139 



Oriqinal from 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 
60 

GERMAN 1 05-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 

rosion and etching of the surface of the glass can be prevented, or 
greatly retarded, by keeping the glass clean and dry. 

(2) Under no condition will polishing liquids, pastes, or abrasives 
be used for polishing lenses and windows, 

(3) For wiping optical parts, use only lens paper specially in- 
tended for cleaning optical glass. Use of the cleaning cloths in the 
field is not permitted. To remove dust, brush the glass lightly with a 
clean camel Vhair brush, and rap the brush against a hard body in 
order to knock out the small particles of dust that cling to the hairs. 
Repeat this operation until all dust is removed. With some instru- 
ments, an additional brush with coarse bristles is provided for cleaning 
mechanical parts. It is essential that each brush be used only for the 
purposes intended. 

(4) Exercise particular care to keep optical parts free from oil 
and grease. Do not wipe the lenses or windows with the fingers. To 
remove oil or grease from optical surfaces, apply ethyl alcohol with 
a clean earners* hair brush, and rub gently with clean lens paper, If 
alcohol is not available, breathe heavily on the glass and wipe off with 
clean lens paper; repeat this operation several times until clean. 

(5 ) Moisture due to condensation may collect on the optical parts 
of the instrument when the temperature of the parts is lower than that 
of the surrounding air. This moisture, if not excessive, can be removed 
by placing the instrument in a warm place. Heat from strongly con- 
centrated sources should not be applied directly, as it may cause un- 
equal expansion of parts, thereby resulting in breakage of optical parts 
or inaccuracies in observation. 

c« Lubricants. 

(1) Where lubrication with oil is indicated, use lubricating oil 
for aircraft instruments and machine guns. 

(2) Where lubrication with grease is indicated, use special lubri- 
cating grease. 

(3) Exposed moving points should be oiled occasionally. Interior 
parts are not to be lubricated by the using arms. Wipe off any excess 
lubricant that seeps from the mechanism to prevent accumulation of 
dust and grit. 

(4) The tripod pivots should be carefully oiled at frequent in- 
tervals. 

(5) Do not oil optical parts. 





140 




UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 

41-44 

CHAPTER 4 

AMMUNITION 

61. GENERAL. 

a* Ammunition for the German 105 -mm field howitzer (l.F.H* 18) 
is similar to U. 5. 105 -mm howitzer ammunition in that the propel- 
ling charge is adjustable in the field for zone firing. The German am- 
munition differs, however, in that the projectile is shipped and loaded 
into the weapon separate from the cartridge case which contains 
the propelling charge and primer. As shipped, the projectiles are 
fuzed. A complete round of ammunition is shown in figure 102. 

62. FIRING TABLES* 

a. The firing tables for use with the German 105-mm howitzer 
will be found in chapter 6. See also paragraph 70, 
63* CLASSIFICATION, 

a. The German 105 -mm howitzer ammunition is classified ac- 
cording to type of projectile (Granate, Gr<) as high-explosive, armor- 
piercing, or smoke. The armor-piercing projectile contains a small 
explosive charge and a base-detonating fuze, with a tracer element, 
for use against armored vehicles and tanks. The high-explosive 
shell contains a larger charge of high explosive and a point-detonating 
fuze for blast effect against targets. The smoke shell contains a 
chemical filler for producing a screening smoke. 

64. AUTHORIZED ROUNDS* 

a. The following rounds of ICS cm. howitzer ammunition may 
be found for use in the German Light Field Howitzer 18 ( LF.tL 18, 
leichte Feldhaubitze 18): 

TABLE I 

GERMAN 105 MM ROUNDS 



NOTES 


PROJECTILE 


CART- 
RIDGE 
CASE 
MODEL 
NO. 1 


Nomenclature' 1 


Ac-lion of 
Fuze 


Wt. pa Fired 
(pound*) 


3 


FH. Or. AZ 23 (H.E. Shell 
with Fuze, A.Z, 23v(0.25)) 


Superquick 
and delay 


32,58 


6342 


3 


F ( H, Gr, 38 AZ 23 (H.E. Shell, 
38, with Fuze, A.Z. 23v 
(0,25)) 


Superquick 
and delay 


32.58 


6342 


3 


FJL Gr. Dopp. Z.S./GOs (H.E. 
Shell with Fuze, Dopp, 
Z.S + /60s) 


Time and 

percussion 


32.58 


6342 




F<H + Gr, 38 Dopp. Z.S./60 Fl. 
(RE. Shell, 38 } with Fuze, 
Dopp. Z.S,/60 FL) 


Time and 
percussion 


32+58 


6342 


4 


F,H, Pzgr. (A.P. Shell with 
Bd. 20 


Base percus- 
sion and tracer 


308 


6342 




FJL Gr. Nb, (Smoke Shell 
with Fuze T Kl A.Z. 23 Nb) 


Superquick 
and delay 


30.87 


6342 



supercharge, charge 6. Primer,. C/]2nA, it auembted in. the cartridge case. 
2 For an explanation of German abbreviation?, see paragraph 75. 

1 This ihdl With A -Z. 23v (0.25) FtlM, or with Dopp- 2.S./GQ Fine set at Eero. and with 
charge S„ may be used against tanJci if A. P. ah ell are not available 

4 Used with charge 5, which is ready for firing, or trie special charge 6. 

, ' Original From 

141 UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



COVER LIFTING STRAP 




CARTRIDGE CASE COVER 




COMBINATION SQ - AND DELAY FUZC 




CARTRIDGE CASE CONTAINING 
PROPELLING CHARGE AND PRIMER 




SHELL 38, CAST STEEL 



RA PD 



Figure 1 02— Complete Round, HJgh-eipJaiJve, for Germ on J 05- mm Light FM4 How frier 



AMMUNITION 



TM E9-325A 
65-66 



65, PREPARATION FOR FIRING, 

a. Fuzed projectiles^ once removed from their packing containers 
and the fuzes properly adjusted, are ready for firing* In preparing the 
armor-piercing projectile for firing, the protective covering of the 
tracer must be removed, 

]>, Should it be necessary to fuze or unfuze projectiles, authorized 
personnel only will do this work. A spanner wrench labeled "A.Z. 23 
and Zt, Z.S./3G" should be used, if available. Also, the fuze setter 
for "A.Z, 23" and Zt. Z.S>/3Q may be used to screw and unscrew fuzes. 

c. Fuzes are adjusted for the desired action as described in para- 
graph 68, 

«L When firing charge 5, which is considered the "standard" 
charge, the propelling charge as shipped in its cartridge case is ready 
for firing. For firing lower zones of fire, the cartridge case cover is 
removed, and the appropriate number of increments removed, as 
described in paragraph 67. For firing the special charge 6> the entire 
standard charge (five sections) is removed. Charge 6 (base section 
and one increment section) is then inserted in the cartridge case. The 
cartridge case cover h always replaced to hold the charge sections 
in place. A Mash reducer (Kartuschvorlage) of spun lead wire (Blei- 
draht) may also be included in the charge if not already present, its 
normal position being immediately above the base section. 

6f>, PROJECTILES, 

a, General, The authorized projectiles for use in the German 
105 -mm Light Field Howitzer, 18, are listed in paragraph 64. The 
high-explosive shell is illustrated in figures 102 and 103. 



}>. Identification. The following identification markings may 
be found on projectiles. These markings may vary* dependent upon 
the particular lots found in the field, 

(1) Olive-drab Color. High-explosive shell are painted olive 
drab. 

(2) Shell Number This appears on both upper and lower 
sections of the high-explosive shell body. To the left of this number 
is an alining mark on both sections. 

(3) Weight- zone Marking ( Gew ic hts kl a sse ) . A black ro- 
man numeral indicates weight-zone marking. The numeral "III" indi- 
cates "standard" weight. No weight corrections in the firing tables are 
necessary in firing shells which are in weight zone IIL 

(4) Date of assembly and manufacturer's initials or symbol. 

143 

14 . . . f~* (SrtnL Original from 

Digged by ^OOglL UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 

GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 



WEIGHT 
ZONE 
MARKING 





CO 




RA PD 53874 



Figure 103— Comporfien of: "J" U.S. 105- mm Ml H. E. 

"2" German 705-mm H. E. Sh*Jf 



144 



DiQitlzod by GOOglC 



OnynW from 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 

AMMUNITION 

(5) A number indicating type of H.E. filler, for example: 1 — in- 
dicates TNT; 2 — indicates picric acid. Other number designations 
will be found in paragraph 75, 

(6) Abbreviations denoting type of shell , for example: 
Tp (Tropen) — For the tropics. 

Ub (Ubung) — Practice, 
Nb (Nebel)— Smoke. 

c. High-explosive Shell. 

(1) General. There are two types of high-explosive shell, the 
field howitzer shell (Feldhaubitze Granate, F.H. Gr.) and the Field 
Howitzer 38 Cast Steel Shell (figs. 102 and 103). 

(2) The German shell is similar in appearance and contour to the 
U. S. 105-mm Howitzer Shell, Ml (fig. 103). Differences to be noted 
are: 

(a ) The German shell is painted a dark olive drab with marking 
in white. The U. S, shell has been painted yellow, but is now painted 
lusterless olive drab with marking in yellow. 

(h) The 7 -degree taper of the base of the German shell starts 
immediately to the rear of the s /s-inch wide copper rotating band, 
whereas in the U. S + shell the base begins to taper about 1 inch to the 
rear of the rotating band, 

(c) The German shell consists of two sections with an adapter 
screwed into the nose of the upper section. The two sections are 
screwed together and staked. The U, S, shell is made of one piece 
of forged steel. 

( d) The German shell has no base cover. 

(e) The German shell is shipped, and loaded into the weapon, 
separate from the propelling charge and primer in their cartridge 
case. The U. S. shell is a component of a semifixed round, the shell 
being normally seated with a free fit in the cartridge case. 

(3) Description. The German point-fuzed shell weighs 32.6 
pounds and contains 3 pounds of high explosive. The length of the 
fuzed shell is 18 %$ inches. It is fuzed with a combination super- 
quick and delay fuze (A.Z. 23) or with a combination time and per- 
cussion fuze (Dopp* Z.S./60)* Besides the high-explosive charge, the 
shell contains a spotting charge of 3.7 ounces of red phosphorus. The 
booster of the shell is assembled in an aluminum container which fits 
snugly into the booster case. The leather washer which is part of the 
booster assembly projects above the container, and acts as a shock 
absorber against the bottom of the fuze. The adapter which holds 
the booster casing in place is a steel disk, three-eighths inch thick. 
Four flats are provided to stake the fuze in place. The average 

f^* Original from 

Diflili«NS by ^OOglC UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 
66 

GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 

diameter of the bourrelet is 4-111 inches, and of the rotating band, 
4,256 inches. On some shell the base immediately below the rotating 
band is grooved, on others it is not. 
(4) Ballistic Data. 

TABLE II 



BALLISTIC DATA FOR GERMAN 105-MM HIGH EXPLOSIVE SHELL 



Propelling Charge 


Muzzle* Velocity 


Maximum Range 


Gru. Preseti re (pop nds 


(zones) 


(feet prr sermul) 


(yards) 


per square inch) 


1 


656 


3910 




2 


761 


5058 




3 


866 


628S 




4 


1040 


8311 




5 (Standard) 


12 83 


10,007 


31,605 


6 (Special) 


1542 


11,674 


33,810 



(5) Packing, The fuzed projectile is packed in an individual 
carrying case (fig. 104). A steel plate protects the tip of the fuze. 
The projectile is removed from the base end of the carrying case. . 
The rear end of the projectile is held in place by a leather or steel 
fastener. The handles of the carrying case may be of canvas or steel. 

(6) Preparation for Firing. The projectile as shipped is 
fuzed, and is ready for firing once removed from its packing container. 
Its fuze need only be adjusted for the desired action as described 
in paragraph 68. 

d. Armor- piercing Shell, 

(1) General. The armor-piercing shell (Panzergranate, Pzgr.) 
contains a base-detonating fuze (Bodenziinder, Bd. Z.), an explosive 
charge, and a tracer element in the fuze assembly. It weighs 30.8 
pounds (14 kilograms). It is fired only with charge 5 t which is ready 
for use as shipped, or the special charge 6. If armor-piercing pro- 
jectiles are not available, the high-explosive shell with impact fuze 
(A,Z + 23) can be used against armored targets. Also, the high- 
explosive shell with the time fuze set at <l zero" may be used for the 
same purpose. 

(2) Ballistic Data. The muzzle velocity of this shell with 
charge 5 is 1,295 feet per second, The armor-piercing shell is nor- 
mally used for ranges up to 1,500 meters or 1,640 yards. 

(3) Preparation for Firing, 

(a) Remove shell from its packing container. 

(b) Remove the protective covering of the tracer element. 

e. Smoke Shell. No information is available at present on the 
smoke shell ( Nebelgranate, Nbgr.). except that it is fuzed with a 
special combination superquick and delay fuze, KL A, Z. 23 Nb. 

146 

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67 



GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 



67. PROPELLING CHARGES* 



a. General, The German 105-mm howitzer propelling charges 
are contained in a brass or steel cartridge case (fig, 106 ) t the former 
case being in one piece, and the latter being either a one-piece or two- 
piece assembly, The charge is divided into five sections to provide for 
zone firing (fig. 10S). To fire the special charge 6, the entire five- 
section charge is removed and replaced by the special increment 6 
and its special base section. The sections are held in place over the 
primer by a cartridge case cover which must be removed, by means 
of its cloth handle, to remove any sections of the charge. This cover 
is replaced after adjustment of the charge is made, A label attached 
to the top of the cartridge case cover identifies the propelling charge 
as to contents and use. 

b. Identification. 

(I) The cartridge case model number (Hulsenbezeichnung) 
stamped on the base of the cartridge case, serves to identify the 
charge for the 105-mm field howitzer, The brass case number is 
6342, The steel case, which is coated or washed with a brass plating, 
is marked 6342 /St, "St" (stahl) indicating steel, or 6342/65 for the 
two-piece type steel case. Other typical markings on the base of the 
cartridge case are shown in figure 107. 



Figure 705 — Component* of CorfrJdgo Cat* and Propelling 
Charge for German 105-mm Howitiar 

141 



PROPELli--' POWKR 




HA PO 5i»7S 




Original From 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



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ftA TV IUTI 

Figure 106 — Seciional Type *f Cartridge Cote for 
German J OS- mm Ho wirier 

T49 

Dlgtotl by GoOgk UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 

GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 



DEI IVLRV NUMBER 



MANUFACTURER 



DESIGN NUMBER 
OF PRIMER 



TYPE OF WEAPON 
(LIGHT FIELD 
HOWITZER-18J 




[YEAR Of 
MANUFACTURE 



(DESIGN NUMBER 
[OF CASE 



RA PD 61203 



Figure 107 — Typical Markings on Base of German lOS-mm 

Cartridge Cote 

(2) The label on the closing cover of the brass case is marked as 
follows: 

TABLE m 
BRASS CARTRIDGE CASE LABEL 



English Equivalent 

* . L*ight field rj.owT.tier, 18 



German Marking 

1.FJL 18 

NgL BL P. 12.5 (40 x 40 x 0.2) . Nitroglycerin powder, 

(grain size) 

Dbg. 37/8 Manufacturer, date, delivery number 

Dig]. BL R 10.5 (3 x 3 x 0J) Diglycol powder, number (grain 

size) increment charge 
Ha. 1237H Manufacturer, date, work mark 

(3) The label on the closing cover of the steel case is marked as 
follows: 

TABLE IV 

STEEL CARTRIDGE CASE LABEL 
German Marking English Equivalent 

Ngl. BL P. (SO. 0. 2) — Nitroglycerin powder (grain siie) base charge 
Rdf 36/44 .Manufacturer, date, delivery number 

Ngl. BL P. (4. 4. 1) .......... ....... ..Nitroglycerin powder (grain size) 

increment charge 

Klietz 36/7 Manufacturer, date, delivery number 

Ce 3.3 7D . Manufacturer, date, work mark 

150 



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67 



AMMUNITION 



(4) Each section of the propelling charge is numbered 1, 2, 3, 
4, or 5. The special charge 6 consists of a special base section and 
a special increment section (fig. 105). Typical marking on each 
section is indicated in table V. Specific markings for all sections are 
summarized below in table VI. 

TABLE V 

TYPICAL MARKINGS ON CHARGE SECTIONS 

^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 
German Marking English Equivalent 

2 ^ > . ^ . ^ ,»>: J . 4 .>» i ^ h Charge number 2 

65g. Dig!. Bl. P. 10.5 (3, 3, 0.8) 65 grams, diglycol powder, 

number (grain size) 

Dbg. 37/3 Manufacturer, date, delivery number 

Ha, I2.37H Manufacturer, date, work mark 



TABLE VI 

SPECIFIC MARKING DATA ON CHARGE SECTIONS 
A* In fimM Cartridge Ca« (No, 6342) (Standard) 



Kind of Powder 
{marked on each section) 



Weight in Grams* (marked on each section) 



N*. Man. N.P. (1.5, LS) 
Digl. Bl. P.— 1Q.S— (3, 3,0. ft) 
Pigl.BJ.F — 10,5— (4,4, 1.2) 



Charge Section 
Number 
{marked on nch 


Special Zone 6 


I 


2 


3 | 4 


5 


Bane Section 


Special Section 


20 
245 




L 








63 


70 120 


190 


222 


000 



B. In Steel Cartridge Case (No. 6342/St) (Substitute Standard) 



Weight in Grams* (marked on each seetiun) 



Kind of Powder 
(marked on each section) 


41har|fc Section 
NumlM-r 
(marktd on *mr.h baft) 


Special Zone 6 


1 


2 


a 




5 


Base Section 


Special Section 


Ntgl- Bl. P.— 12.5— (44J, 44), 
0.2) 

Nigl. Bl. P.— 12.5— (4, 4, I) 
NlgL Bl. P.— 12.5— (10, 10, 
1.5) 


100 














55 


60 


115 


1R.1 


200 


705 



* — Kilogram (Kg.) weights mmy appear in marking on Cftrtfidee 
tbu«: .190 Kg may be itenciled on the bag in lieu of 180 g. 



in place of grama £ g ) ; 



Ci Description, Sections are arranged in numerical sequence in 
the cartridge case. To fire charge 5, which is the "standard" charge, 
no adjustment of the charge is necessary. To fire charge 4 t the sec- 
tion numbered 5 is removed; the remaining sections, sections 1, 2, 
3, and 4, are left in numerical sequence so that numeral "4" appears 
uppermost. The same procedure applies to adjusting the charge for 



Digirired by Google 



Original From 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 
67-68 

GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 

firing charges 1, 2, or 3. To fire the special charge 6, the entire five- 
section charge is removed and replaced in the cartridge case by the 
special charge 6, which consists of a special base section and a 
special increment section. The cartridge case cover, which is removed 
when adjusting the charge, is replaced after adjustment is made. Since 
the propellent powders used are not flash less, a flash reducer (Kar- 
tuschvorlage ) of spun lead wire (Bleidraht) is normally attached to 
the top of the base section. This flash reducer varies the performance 
of the gun. The propellent powders are of the diglycol nitrate type 
(Digl. or DgK) or the nitroglycerin type (Nigl. or Ngl.). For muzzle 
velocities and pressures developed with charges 1 through 6, inclusive, 
see table II, paragraph 66, 

d. Packing. Cartridge cases are packed in a wooden box (fig. 
108), Steel projections on the base of the bo* hold the closing 
cover of the cartridge case in place. The dimensions of the box are, 
approximately, 19 V* by 8 x 11 inches, 

e. Preparation. 

(1) The cartridge case, as shipped, is ready for firing the charge 
5 which is the "standard" charge. 

(2) For lower zones of fire, the charge is prepared for firing 
as follows: 

(a) Remove the cartridge case cover by means of the canvas 
lifting handle. If the cover cannot be removed easily, it should be 
pressed into the case at the circumference opposite the lifting handle. 
This will slightly loosen the cover. 

(b ) Remove the sections until the uppermost section indicates 
the desired charge number. 

(c) Replace the cartridge case cover, pressing it firmly against 
the charge. 

(3) For firing special charge 6, remove the cover as described 
above, replace the entire charge with the special section 6 with its 
special base section (par. 67, table VI), and replace the cartridge 
case cover. 

(4) To assemble the flash reducer, the cartridge cover is removed 
as described above t the appropriate flash reducer — the 2 5 -gram spun 
Lead wire for all zones and Nigl. P. charges, the 10-gram spun lead 
wire for all zones and DigU P. charges— is placed in the charge to be 
used, and the cartridge case cover replaced. 

NOTE: The flash reducer varies the performance of the weapon. 
68. FUZES. 

a. General The fuzes used with the German 105-mm howitzer 
HJE. shell consist of a combination superquick and delay fuze similar 
to the U. S. fuze, P. D. t M48, and a combination time and point- 

152 

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AMMUNITION 

detonating fuze. It appears that these German fuzes are not boresafe 
fuzes, 

CAUTION: Fuzes will not be disassembled. Any attempt to di$- 
assemble fuzes in the field is dangerous and is prohibited except 
under specific directions from the Chief of Ordnance. 

b. German Fuze, A, 23. 

(1) Description. This fuze (figs, 102, 103) contains two ac- 
tions, superquick (ohne versogering, o.v.) and delay (mit versogering, 
m.v.). Although both actions are initiated on impact, the functioning 
of the shell depends upon the setting of the selector of the fuze. Un- 
like the U. S. Fuze, P, D„ M48, it should be noted that there is only 
one firing pin (fig. 109), Should this firing pin fail in the German 
fuze, the projectile will become a dud. However, it appears that 
the firing pin assembly is more sensitive to impact than the TX S. 
Fuze, P, D., M48. Also, unlike the M48 Fuze, the German fuze is 
not a boresafe fuze. As shipped, the fuze is set for super quick action, 
that is, the slot in the setting sleeve of the selector is parallel to the 
axis of the fuze and is thus alined with the registration line marked 
"0." To set the fuze for delay action, the slotted setting sleeve is 
turned 90 degrees so that the slot is alined with the line marked 
U M" on one side of the setting sleeve, and with "V 0.25" on the other 
side. The delay action is provided by a delay pellet of 0.2 5 -second 
delay. The setting may be changed at will with a screwdriver or 
with "setting key A.Z. 23" (Stellschussel Fur A,Z. 23) at any time 
before firing. This can be done even in the dark by noting the 
position of the slot — parallel to the fuze action for superquick ("0") 
action, or at right angles thereto for delay action ("M" and "V" 0.25). 

(2) Preparation for Firing. As shipped, the fuze is ready 
for firing with superquick action. To set the fuze for delay action, 
the setting sleeve is turned with the setting key or screwdriver, as 
described above, through 90 degrees, so that the slot on the setting 
sleeve is alined with the letters and "V 0.25." Fuzes which have 
not been fired should be reset to superquick. The slot will then be 
in line with 

c« German Fuzes, Dopp. Z*S./<>0* and Dap p. Z.S./60F1. 

(1) Description, These are combination time and impact fuzes 
similar in action to the U. S. Fuze, P. D., MS 4, The Dopp. Z.5./60s 
is used with the field howitzer shell and the Dopp. Z.S./60F1. is used 
with the Field Howitzer Shell 38 Cast Steel. As shipped, these fuzes 
are ready for firing as impact fuzes. For use as time fuzes, they must 
be set at the setting values indicated in firing tables by means of the 
fuze setter provided. These values apply to the remaining distance of 
flight, in meters, starting from the muzzle. The zero setting of the 

153 

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68 

GERMAN 10S-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 




Figure T06 — Packing Box tar German 1 05- mm Cartridge C««$ 

154 

t\i •. tf~*r\r\«li» Original from 

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TM E9-325A 
68-70 

AMMUNITION 

fuze is 41 recess over recess"; on the fuze setter, indicator (arrow) at 
zero. The fuze setter is set at the fuze setting found in the firing table, 
and the fuze is set as described in paragraph 58. A time-safety feature 
in these fuzes prevents time action below 1 second time of flight, 
but they can operate upon impact before that time, 

(2) Preparation for Firing. The Dopp. Z.S./60 fuzes are 
ready for firing as impact fuzes. For time action they are prepared 
for firing as described in step (1), above. Fuzes which have been 
set on projectiles prepared for 5 ring but not fired, must be reset at 
zero. This resetting is accomplished in the same manner as described 
above but with the fuze setter index at zero. 

69. PRIMERS. 

a. A primer (figs. 105 and 107) is screwed into the cartridge case 
at time of manufacture* This primer, marked '*C/12nA* ! , is of the 
same type and contour as the British 40 -mm primer and is inter- 
changeable with it. All metal parts of the primer are brass. The 
percussion element is screwed into the body of the primer. A wrench 
supplied with equipment for the weapon is for the assembly of 
primers to, or the disassembly of primers from, the cartridge case, 
The presence of this wrench indicates the possibility of frequent 
misfires. 

70, INTERCH ANG E A B I LIT Y OF AMMUNITION ITEMS. 

■ 

a+ U&e of LI, S. Ammunition Components, 

(1) The following information is based on preliminary firing 
tests and should be used only in cases of emergency where the tac- 
tical situation demands such practices. All safety measures mils* be 
observed when interchanging and mixing ammunition components, t 

(2) The American 105-mm Shell, H, Ml* has been fired from 
the German 105 -mm howitzer, using the American 105-mm Howitzer 
M2, M2A1, and M4 charges for zones 1 through 5, inclusive. Firing 
table 105-H-3 is approximately correct for such firing. 

(3) A charge prepared by removing section 4 from charge 7 of 
the American 105-mm howitzer charge produces approximately the 
same result as the German special charge 6. 

(4) The charges described in steps (2) and (3), above, must be 
placed in the German 105-mm Cartridge Case, 6342. The American 
cartridge case cannot be used in the German howitzer. 

(5) The German howitzer should not normally be fired with 
charges above charge S of the American charge because the German 
weapon was not designed to withstand the recoil produced by 
charges 6 and 7. 

h. Primers. The British No. IS primer is interchangeable with 

155 

t*%f>nlt> Original from 

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fiqun 10? — German A. Z. 23 Fuie — Sectional View 



TM E9-325A 

70-72 

AMMUNITION 

the German primer C/12nA. In addition, other calibers of German 
ammunition have the German C/12nA primer as a component of the 
cartridge case. 

71. TROPICAL AMMUNITION, 

a* Ammunition for use in the tropics is marked in red lettering, 
as follows: "P. T. + 25° C." This marking is indicated on sections 
of variable propelling charges, on the bottom of cartridge cases, and 
on the label of the cartridge case closing cover. Shell for use in 
tropics may be marked "Tp." 

h. Containers for tropical ammunition have the following labels 
printed in red on white: 

Fur Tropen 
Norma le Pulvertemperature 

■f 25° C. 

c. Tropical ammunition has reduced weight of propellent and 
gives normal range table performance at -j-25°C (77°F)* Where 
tropical ammunition has not been issued or manufactured, special 
range tables are provided for use in the tropics with standard am- 
munition. The temperature taken as normal for standard ammunition 
is 10° C (50° F). 

72. PRECAUTIONS IN HANDLING CAPTURED AMMUNI- 
TION. 

a. All captured ammunition should be examined by qualified 
personnel as soon as practicable. Loose ammunition may be dan- 
gerous, and is rarely worth the trouble of collection. 

b. Ammunition may be dangerous because of: 

(1) Deliberate "booby traps" laid by the enemy. 

(2) Having been subjected to fire or shelling. 

(3) Removal of safety devices from fuzes, etc. (either deliberate 
or accidental). 

(4) Exposure rendering explosive elements unreliable. 

c Ammunition known or suspected of being dangerous will not 
be moved or touched, but destroyed in accordance with TM 9-1900* 

d. Destroyed ammunition should be salvaged for brass parts. In 
addition, all enemy airtight containers should be returned to the base. 
This also applies to timber and wooden boxes suitable for use as 
dunnage, or for remaking ammunition boxes. 

e. Ammunition should be recovered by complete rounds, for ex- 
ample; unfuzed shells are useless without the appropriate fuzes. 

i. Personnel handling captured ammunition should keep in mind 
the fact that although the two types of ammunition appear to have 

157 

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72-75 

GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 

identical measurements, they are not necessarily interchangeable. 
Experiments to ascertain inte [-changeability are forbidden except by 
special authority. 

g. No unauthorized modifications or experimentation will be car- 
ried out on any ammunition. 

73. CARE, HANDLING, AND PRESERVATION. 

a. In addition to the precautions and care in handling ammu- 
nition given in TM 9-325, the following apply particularly to Ger- 
man ammunition used in the German 105 -mm howitzer: 

(1) In firing the armor-piercing shell, remove the protective 
covering of the tracer before loading into the gun. 

(2) The fuze, A*Z. 23 v (0.2S) is particularly sensitive, hence, it 
is important that the path of flight before the muzzle be free of all 
obstacles including small branches and leaves. Otherwise, premature 
burst may occur, 

(3) Components of ammunition prepared for firing but not fired 
will be returned to their original condition and packing. 

(4) Projectiles with impact fuzes (A_Z. fuzes) whose top or 
forward closing disk has been so damaged that the firing pin is 
pressed down or has fallen out, will not be fired* They are, however, 
safe to transport* 

(5) Projectiles with time and percussion fuzes (Do pp. Z. fuzes) 
may not be fired when the rotatable closing cap of the fuze is bent, 
dented, damaged ( or cannot be turned by the fuze setter. However, 
they are safe to transport 

(6) Projectiles and fuzes which have fallen and have not been 
damaged may be fired* 

(7) After each round is fired, at night or in the daytime, it is 
necessary to examine the bore of the weapon to determine whether 
any pieces of bag or other foreign matter remains in the bore* All par- 
ticles or obstructions should be removed to prevent jamming of the 
weapon upon firing the next round. 

74. FIELD REPORT OF ACCIDENTS, 

a. Any malfunctions of ammunition must be promptly reported 
to the Ordnance officer under whose supervision the materiel is main- 
tained or issued (AR 750-10). 

75. GERMAN ABBREVIATIONS AND GLOSSARY OF AM- 
MUNITION ITEMS. 

a. General* The following abbreviations, symbols, and terms 
may be found on labels or in communications and literature pertain- 
ing to the ammunition items described herein. Certain general terms 
are also included, 

15ft 



. . frtrtnlf* Original from 

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AMMUNITION 

b. Abbreviations. 

TABLE VII 
GERMAN AMMUNITION ABBREVIATIONS 

A£ \,,.Aufschlagzunder Percussion fuze 

A.Z. m. V, ... .« Aufschlagziinder mit 

versogerung .. Percussion fuze with 

delay action 

Bd . Z. Bodenz u nder Base percussion fuze 

BL . Blindganger Dud 

Bl P. BIMttch enpul ver Flaked gunpowder 

Bz* Brennz under , . . Time fuze ( powder train 

type) 

Digl. or Dgl Digtycol Di glycol 

Dopp, Z. or D. Z.Doppelz under r ... Combination fuze 

Ex. Mun* Exerzier munition Dummy ammunition; 

blank ammunition 

f " F'ur t^or 

FJL Feldhaubitze Field howitzer 

Fib. Fliigbahn Trajectory 

Fp ..Fullpulver High explosive 

Gesch Gescho&s Projectile; shell 

^Ir. , , , Gas granate ... T , Cias shel I 

^jr , . ^jranate ... ... ... . Shell 

Grfr Granatfulling Bursting charge of shell 

Gr. m.P. Granate mit Panzerkopf Armor-piercing shell 

Gr. Z. or GZ Granatzunder Shell fuze 

H Hexagen Cyclonite, RJD.X. 

Hulzenkart Hulzenkartusche Cartridge case (separate 

loading) 

H.Z Haubitzziinder Howitzer shell fuze 

K.la ---.-H------ j__^-i.iijbi.j fd^n 1X1 4- 1 ■ p 4.+ M- iH ■IDE! i ■ SSjXXfll [ 

ft J5i ■ i ■ ■ ■ i 1 . , t , , , . . . T^.r 

Kz Kopfziinder Point-detonating fuze " 

LFJH, , Leichte Feldhaubitze ........ Light field howitzer 

Ldg, or L Ladung Charge; propelling 

charge; load 

Ig. F. H. Gr, Lange Fe Id h a ubitz granate Long field howitzer shell 

Lggr, Langgranate Long shell 

m- - Mit with 

fttfun, Munition , ...Ammunition 

m.v. Mit versogerung With delay (fuzes) 

Nb. Nebel Smoke 

Nbgr. .Nebel granate Smoke shell 

Ng L or NigL Nit rog 1 yzerin , P Nitrogly ce r i n 

Np. . . , Nitropenta F,E.T,N.; penthrite 

Nr. Nummer Number 

15* 

Ann |, v Original from 

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75 

GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 



TABLE VII 
GERMAN AMMUNITION ABBREVIATIONS (Comd.) 

o. Ohne Without 

o.v, Ohne versogerung Without delay (super- 
quick) 

P.K Pulverkasten ... . Ammunition box 

P. S. Gr. Panzerstahlgranate Steel armor-piercing 

shell 

P. T, Pulvertemperature Ammunition tempera- 
ture 

Pzgr. or Pz. Gr. Panzer granate Armor-piercing shell 

Pz. Spr. Gr* Panzersprenggranate ........High-explosive armor- 
piercing shell 

Sch. Tf Schlusstafel Firing table 

Sch, Z. Schr* Schlagzundschraube .. Threaded base percus- 
sion fuze 

Sonderkart Sonderkartusche Special charge 

Sprgr. or Spr, Gr, Sprenggranate High-explosive shell 

St- Stahl ..Steel 

Tp. Tropen ....... r ... Tropics 

Ub. Ubung Practice 

Ubgr, orUb. Gr. . ..Ubungsgranate Practice shell 

v. Versbgerung Delay (fuzes) 

Z* Zursder ....................Fuze 

Zdschr. Zundschraube Threaded percussion 

primer 

Zt. Z. or ZZ. Ze it z under Time fuze 

c. GloflHary. 

TABLE VIII 
GERMAN AMMUNITION TERMS 

Bleidraht Lead wire Haubitzziinder 

Brisanz High (H.Z.) Howitzer 

explosive shell fuze 

Brisanzgeschoss High- Hauptladung Propellent 

explosive (lit: main 

shell charge) 

Briz a nz munition . High- Holzkasten Wooden 

explosive box 

ammuni- Hiilse r — 

tion 

Gewichtsklasse Weight class Hulsenbezeichnung Cartridge 

(shell) case des- 

Haube Ballistic ignation 

cap (number) 

Haub i tze Howitzer 

160 

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TABLE VIII 

GERMAN AMMUNITION ABBREVIATIONS (ContdO 



Kertusche 

Kartuschhulse 
Kartuschkorb 



I I ■ ■ I I J ■ L I 



Cartridge 
case 

Cartridge 
case 

Ammuni- 
tion 
basket 



Rauchloses Pulver . Smokeless 

powder 

Rauch-schwaches 

Pulver Smokeless 

powder 

Rohrsicherer Zunder Bore-safe 

fuze 



Kartuschmunition .. Semifixed Stellschlussel 



■ it i i i j _ i . 



am muni- 



■ ■Li l ■ ■. i 



case wad; 
flash re- 
ducer 

Kennbuchstabe Identifica- 
tion mark 

Lieferungsnummer Delivery 

number 

Nebelgeschoss Smokeshell 



r i i - r r i n ■ r i i -i m r i ■->■ 



Powder 
Powder 



(fuzes); 
hand fuze 
setter; ad- 
justing 
wrench 
... . Flash hider 
. . . Fuze setting 
Hand fuze 
setter 

Zunderstel I maschine Fuze setter 
Z und e rst el lsc h 1 usse 1 Hand fuze 

setter 



Vorlage 

Zunderstellun^ 
Zunderschlussel 



d. German Explosives Abbreviations, 

TABLE IX 

GERMAN EXPLOSIVES ABBREVIATIONS 
Abbreviation German Nomenclature 



Fp 02 Fullpulver 
Fp 5 Fullpulver 5 
Fp 10 Fullpulver 10 
Fp 40/60 Fullpulver 
Grf 88 Granatfulling 88 
H 

H S 
Np 

Np 10 
Np 40 
Np 65 



Hexagen 5 
Nitropenta 
Nitropenta 10 
Nitropenta 40 
Nitropenta 65 



TNT with 5% montan wax 

TNT with 10% montan wax 

40-60 amatol, poured 

Picric acid 

Cyclonite; RD.X. 

Cyclonite with 5% montan wax 

P f E/I\N H ; penthrite 

P. E.T.N, with 10% montan wax 

P,E.T.N. with 40% montan wax 

P,RT-N. with 65% montan wax 



161 

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GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 

e. Index Numbers on German Shell Indicating Type of H. E. 
Filler. 

TABLE X 

NUMBERS ON GERMAN SHELL INDICATING TYPE OF IL E. FILLER 



Shell T ™ c df FillMr 

1 Fp 02 (TNT) in paper or cardboard container 

2 Grf 88 (picric acid) in paper or cardboard container 

10 Fp 02 + Fp 5 + Fp 10 (TNT fillers) in paper or card- 
" board container 

13 Fp 40/60 ( 40-60 amatol, poured) 

14 Fp 02 (TNT), poured 

32 Np 10 (P.E.T.N. filler) in paraffin -waxed paper wrapping 

5/38 Np 40 + Np 60 (P.E.T.N. fillers) in paraffin-waxed 
paper wrapping 

91 H 5 (Cyclonite; R.D.X.) in paraffin- waxed paper wrap- 
ping 



1*2 



f^* _ _ Original from 

Difliiircd by l»OOgk UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 

76 



CHAPTER S 

ACCESSORIES 

76. ACCESSORIES, 

a. Accessories include the tools and equipment required for such 
disassembling and assembling as the using arms is authorized to per- 
form, and for cleaning and preserving the (German) 105 -mm howitzer 
and carriage. Accessories should not be used for purposes other than 
those prescribed, and when not in use should be properly stored. 

(1) Air Testing and Refilling Apparatus (F, fig. 111). This 
apparatus is used when testing and /or refilling the equilibrator with 
compressed air. It consists of an adapter, a flexible hose connection, 
two pressure gages, and two plugs contained in a metal chest which 
has a wood insert cut to receive these items. Spare washers and gaskets 
are also contained in this chest. A high pressure compressed air cylinder 
is the source of supply of the compressed air. The adapter is T-shaped 
with three female threaded openings at one end, and a male threaded 
connector at the other end. The flexible hose connection is 7 feet long 
with connectors at both ends which are protected by caps. Both 
pressure gages are identical and are interchangeable. They are grad- 
uated from to 160 kilograms per square centimeter (2,275 pounds 
per square inch), in 5-kilogram units (71 pounds). The plugs fit the 
openings of the adapter. The compressed air cylinder has a capacity 
of 5-2 liters (0.24 cubic feet), and has a cap which protects the hand 
valve. When testing the air pressure of the system, assemble the 
adapter with two plugs and one gage, and screw into the equilibrator, 
The reading on the gage gives the pressure of the system. When re- 
filling the system, assemble the adapter with one plug, one gage and 
screw into the equilibrator. Connect one end of the flexible hose con- 
nection to the adapter, and the other to the compressed air cylinder. 
Turn the hand valve so that air flows into the system, and discon- 
nect after the proper gage reading is reached. 

(2) Bore Brush (A, C ? D, fig. 110). The bore brush is used for 
cleaning the bore of the howitzer. The aiming posts supplied with the 
howitzer are used as a handle for the bore brush. The bristles of the 
brush are made from a vegetable fiber, A cover is furnished for the 
bore brushes. 

(3) Breech and Cradle Cover (C, fig. 112). The breech and 
cradle cover is made of artificial leather. It is held in place by straps 
passing under the cradle and held snugly around the breech ring. 

(4) Engineer's Wrench (C, 0g, 111). This is a standard open- 
end wrench with 2 7 -mm and 32 -mm openings. The 27-mm end is 
used on the wheel rim bolts and the howitzer locking bracket bolts. 
The 32-mm end is used on the compressed air cylinder, 

163 

f^* Original from 

Diflili«NS by ^OOglC UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-32SA 
7* 



ACCESSORIES 

■ 

(5) Fuze Wrench (D p fig. 1 1 1 ). This wrench is a circular single 
pin spanner wrench used for the A,Z. 23 Fuze. 

(6) Grease and Oil Containers (A, B, fig. 111). These con- 
tainers are metal boxes used for storing the grease and oil necessary 
for the lubrication of the howitzer and carriage. 

(7) Lubricating Gun and Hose (E, fig. 111). This is a screw- 
handle-type grease gun with a flexible metal covered hose. The hose 
has a button-head fitting used for greasing the howitzer and carriage. 

(8) Muzzle Cover (A, fig. 112). The muzzle cover is made of 
leather and has a red reflector. It fits snugly over the muzzle and is 
held in place by a strap which attaches to the recuperator support. 

(9) Rammer (E f fig. 110). The rammer is used for ramming 
in the powder charge and projectile. It is 33 inches long and has two 
wooden heads. Both heads are circular in shape, the larger one having 
an indentation at the end, while the smaller one is flat 

(10) Shell Remover {B t fig- 110). The shell remover consists 
of a piece of hardwood recessed to fit the shell contour. Two metal 
ferrules prevent the wood from splitting. No handle was provided for 
this shell remover. 

(11) Sight Cover (B, fig. 112). The sight cover is made prin- 
cipally of canvas, A leather section is provided at the top where it 
contacts the panoramic telescope. It is held in place by straps. 



H7 



f^i-w^vn lf> Original Prom 

' l)b Y K V L UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 

77 

GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 

CHAPTER 6 

FIRING TABLES 

77. FIRING TABLES. 

a. The following are the firing tables for the 105-mm (German) 
light field howitzer, They are divided into two parts : the first con- 
tains data for the Field Howitzer Shell (F.H. Gr.) p Field Howitzer 
Shell, Cast Steel (F.H. Gn 38 Stg.), and Field Howitzer Projectile 
(10 cm Pzgr.); and the second contains data for Field Howitzer 
Shell, Smoke (FJf. Gr« Nb.)- 



■ 



168 

„ . f"*rtrtiil^> Original from 

DigniM by ^OOgle UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 



LIGHT FIELD HOWITZER, 105 MM [GERMAN) 

FIRING 

FIELD HOWITZER SHELL (RH. Gr.) 
FIELD HOWITZER SHELL, CAST STEEL {F H. Gr. 38 Stg.) 

AND 

FIELD HOWITZER PROJECTILE (10 cm PigrO <s» ch»r 9 . 5) 



169 

p fln nlfTr Original from 

Digged by V^UUglt UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 



Shells, F.H. Gr. and F.H. Gr. 38 Stg. 
Fuzes, A,Z.23v{0.25), Dopp. X, 5/60«. f and Dopp. I. S/60 Fl* 
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CHARGE 1 



170 



, , /"^rtnLj* Original from 

Dig.lizorJ by ^OOgK UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-335A 



Shells, F.H, Cr. and F + H. Gr. 38 Stg. 
Fuzes, AX23v(0.25), Depp. % S/60s., and Depp. I. S/60 Fl* 
Muzzle Velocity, 656 f/s — Charge 1 



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CHARGE 1 



171 



, , /^#^rtnlij» Original from 

Oig.lized by kjOOglL UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 



Shells, F.H. Gr. and F.H, Gr. 38 Stg. 
Fute*, A.Z,23v(0.25), Dopp. Z. S/60s>, ond Dopp. Z. S/60 Fl* 
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CHARGE 1 



172 



, , /"^rtnLj* Original from 

Oig.nzed by ^OOgK UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 



Shells, F.H. Gr, and F.H. Gr, 38 Stg. 
Fuxet, A.Z.23v(0.25), Dopp. Z* 5/60*., and Dopp. Z. 5/60 F1*. 
Muzzle Velocity, 656 f /s — Charge 1 



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CHARGE 1 



173 



Drifted by Google UNIVEP^ITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 



Shells, F.H. Gr. and F.H. Or. 38 Stg. 
Fuiei, A.Z.23v(0.25), Dopp. Z, S/60*., and Dopp. Z. 5/60 Fl* 
Muzzle Velocity, 761 f/i — Charge 2 



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0.0 


700 


54.6 


5 


B.B 


11 


2.6 


13 





1 


16.6 




1 


00 


600 


65.4 


5 


9.0 


1 1 


32 


14 





1 


14.4 


] 


2 


0,0 


900 


74.4 


5 


90 


1 1 


3.6 


14 





T 


12.7 




2 


0,0 


1 000 


HI A 


5 


9 "} 


11 
i i 


4 


1 5 


n 

u 


l 


1 1 3 






y.u 


1100 


92.B 


6 


9.2 




1 1 


4.4 


16 





1 


10.2 


1 


2 


0.0 


1200 


1020 


6 


9.2 


11 


4.8 


17 




1 


9.3 


] 


2 


0.0 


1300 


1 1 1.2 


6 


9.4 


11 


J. 3 


17 





2 


65 




3 


0,0 


1400 


120.6 


7 


9,4 


1! 


57 


14 





2 


7,6 




3 


0,0 


1 500 

1 v %r 4r 


1 30 2 


7 


9 6 


10 


6 1 


i a 
1 9 


u 


4 


7,2 


. 


* 


U. 1 


1600 


139,6 




9,6 


10 


6.5 


20 





2 


6.7 


1 


3 


0.1 


1700 


149,6 


6 


9.8 


10 


7.0 


21 





2 


6,3 


! 


4 


0.1 


1*00 


159,4 


6 


10.0 


10 


7.4 


21 





2 


5.9 




4 


0.1 


1900 


169.4 


9 


10.0 


10 


7.9 


22 





2 


5,5 




4 


0.1 




179 4 

Iff 


a 


1 □ 2 


1 


a 3. 


23 





2 


5 2 




5 


0.1 


2100 


169.6 


10 


10.4 


10 


e.e 


?A 


1 


3 


4.9 


i 


5 


0,1 


2200 


200,0 


10 


10.4 


10 


9.2 


25 


1 


3 


4.6 


! 


5 


0.1 


2300 


210.6 


1 1 


10.6 


9 


9.7 


26 


1 


3 


4,4 




6 


0.1 


i 400 


1 O 

221 -2 


1 2 


1 O.H 


9 


10.1 


27 


1 


3 


4,J 




6 


0.1 


2500 


232.0 


12 


11.0 


9 


10.6 


28 


1 


3 


4.0 




6 


0.1 


2600 


243.2 


13 


1 1.2 


9 


1 1,1 


29 


1 


3 


3.6 




7 


0,1 


2700 


254,6 


14 


11.4 


9 


1 1.6 


30 


1 


3 


3.6 




7 


0.1 


2600 


266.0 


14 


1 1.6 


9 


12.1 


31 


1 


3 


3,4 




7 


0J 


2900 


277.6 


15 


its 


6 


12.6 


; 32 


1 


3 


3.2 


2 


8 


0,1 


3000 


269.4 


16 


12.0 


a 


13.1 


33 


1 


4 


31 


2 


8 


0,1 



CHARGE 2 



174 



Digitized by Google 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY' OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 



Shells, F.H. Or. and F.H. Gr. 38 Stg, 
Fuzm, AX23v(0.25), Dapp. Z. 5/60i„ and Depp. Z. S/60 Fl* 
Muzxfft Valocity, 761 f /i — Charge 2 



14 


J* 


H 


17 


It 


1? 


20 j 


31 


22 


21 


1 


Coftipl«m>tvtary 
onfll « of 






















% 

1 

t 

- 

fi 


















■ 

1 
+ 


• 

1 

T 


1- 

* « 


& - 

E - 

< 


>*- 

a 

I! 

* 


> 


i • 

| 


ftfi 
to \ 

a 


■ 

? 


at 






Wl 


V£ 


T. mp 


W-B 




F5 


H* 




t 


mil 








yd 


yd 




MC 


mil 


yd 


■ 

yd 


,00 


ftft 

.00 




0.0 




o.o 














,00 
.00 
+,01 
+,01 


.00 
.00 
-.01 
—.01 




+0.2 
+0,5 
+0.7 
+ 1 ,0 




0.0 
0.0 
0,0 

1 ~! 1 

+0.1 








19 
j. \ 






100 
200 
300 

4UU 


J 1 
+.01 


— .01 




+ 12 




L A 4 

+0.1 





24 






500 


+0.1 
+0.1 
+♦02 
+►02 


—0.1 
-0.1 
-.02 

ft 1 

— .02 




+ 1.4 
+ 1 .7 
+ 2.0 
+ 2,2 




+0.1 
+0.1 
+0-1 
+ 0.2 




o 






26 
23 
30 

33 






600 
700 
300 


+ .02 


— 02 




+ 2.4 




+0.2 





33 






1000 


+.02 
+.02 

+.03 

_i ft* 


—.02 
-.02 
-03 
— .03 


5 



'5 


+2.7 
+ 3 
+ 3.2 
+ 3.4 


* 

□ 


+0,2 
+0.2 
+0.3 
+0.3 


—1 

_ 1 

-1 

1 

— 1 


37 

40 
42 

4 J 


* 

jQ 
D 


• 

a 


1 100 
1 200 
1300 

1 4UU 


+.03 


ft *t 
— .03 


> 

D 




+ 3,7 




1 n rh 

+0.3 


-t 


47 


D 

"S 


1 

o 


1500 


+.03 
+.03 
+.04 
+ .04 


—.03 
—.03 
-.04 
— ,04 


E 

2 

8 


+ 3.9 
+ 4 t 2 
+4,4 


g 

c 
□ 

fi 


+0.4 
+0.4 

+0.3 

1 J-"i c 

+0.5 


—1 

1 

— 1 


30 
32 
55 


E 
D 


c 

1 


1600 
[700 
1800 
i vuu 


+.04 


—,04 




+4,9 




+0.3 


-1 


60 






2000 


+.05 
+.03 
+ 06 
+.06 


—.04 
—.05 
—.03 

-OA 




+3.1 
+ 3.4 
+ 3.6 
+ 39 




+0.6 
+.06 
+0,6 
+07 


—1 

_1 

— 2 

— 2 


63 
65 
68 
70 






2100 
2200 
2300 
2400 


+ .07 


-.06 




+ 6.1 




+0.7 


-2 


73 






2500 


+ .QS 
+.06 
+.09 
+.09 


-07 
^.07 

-.03 

—.08 




+ 6.3 
+ 6.6 
+ 6.8 
+ 7.0 




+0,7 
+0.B 

+ 0.8 
+0.8 


-2 
-2 
—2 
—2 


76 
73 

ei 

84 






2600 
2700 
2300 
2900 


+.10 


| -.09 




+ 7.3 




+0.9 


— 2 


| 87 


1 3000 



CHARGE 2 



175 



Drifted by Google UNIVEP^ITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 



Shells, F.H. Gr. and F.H. Or, 38 Stg. 
Fuzm, A.Z.23v(0.25), Dopp. Z. S/60s., and Depp. Z. S/60 F1* 
Muzzle Velocity, 7*1 f /s — Charge 2 



1 


2 


3 


4 


J 


6 


7 


a 


9 


id 


Tl 


12 


13 








ij 

i 5 

s = 


1 

rl 

n _ 
Z e 




error 














■ - u 

o * 
> c 
* g 


• 

E 

p 






! 








c — - 
-o 1 


a 
e 
at 


■ 

q 


M 


E O 
O — 

_c 

U 


,= *j 

L f 




• 

EL 

4 


j 

I 
I 

«E 

a 


Hi 

D 

z 


it 

% 
m 


% c 

u 

1 E 


Q 


I 


R 


El 


r 


C 


mil 


Tima 








Slop* 


L 


Dft 


YY-D 


yd 


mil 


mil 


^ I 


yd 






yd 


nri 1 


1/- 


No 


mil 


mil 




28?4 


16 


12,0 


8 


13,1 


3 3 


1 


4 


3.1 


2 


8 


0.1 


1 1 Art 
J 1 OO 


**rt 1 A 

JO 1 .o 


17 


12.4 


8 


1 J.o 


34 


1 


4 


3-0 


2 


8 


0.1 


3200 


314,0 


18 


12.* 


e 


14.1 


35 


1 


4 


2.8 


2 


9 


0.1 


3 300 


326J 


18 


13.0 


8 


14.7 


35 


1 

1 


A 


2.7 


2 


9 


2 




Tin o 


19 


1 3.2 


R 


i j.j 


36 


1 


4 


I. -. t> 


4 


10 


0.2 


3500 


353.4 


20 


13.6 


7 


15.8 


37 

— 


1 


4 


2.5 


i 


10 


0.2 


■J irtfl 
j&UU 


SO/ .J 


22 1 4.2 


/ 


1 Q-4 


38 


2 


4 


2.4 


2 


1 1 


0.2 


3700 


381.6 


23 


14.6 


7 


17,0 


39 


2 


5 


2,3 


2 


1 1 


0.2 


3 BOO 


396.6 


24 


15.2 


7 


17,6 


40 






2.2 


2 


1 2 


0,2 






26 


15,8 






41 


2 


5 


■f ■ r 


TJ 


13 


0.2 


4000 


428.4 


2B 


16.6 


6 


a a.e 


42 


2 


5 


1.99 


2 


1 3 


0.2 


4 1 OO 


4 4 J.4 


30 


17.4 


j 

D 


1 9,5 


43 


2 


6 


i an 
1 .a¥ 


3 


14 


0,2 


4200 


463.2 


32 


18.4 


5 


20.2 


44 


2 


6 


1.80 


3 


15 


0.2 


4300 


4S2.2 


35 


t9.6 


5 


21.0 


46 


2 


6 


1.71 


3 


15 


0.2 


4400 


502.6 


39 


21 


5 


21.8 


47 


2 


7 


1.62 


3 


16 


0.2 


4500 


524.4 


44 


22.8 


4 


22.6 




1 


7 


1.54 


3 


IS 


0.2 


4600 


548-2 


50 


25,2 


4 


23.5 


49 


2 


8 


1.46 


3 


19 


02 


4700 


574.8 


58 


28.4 


3 


24.5 


51 


3 


8 


1.39 


3 


20 


0.3 


4 BOO 


605.4 


69 


33.2 


3 


25.6 


52 


3 


9 


1.32 


3 


21 


0.3 


| 4900 


642.2 


89 


4 3.2 


2 


26.8 


54 


3 


10 


1.26 


3 


23 


0.3 


| 5000 


693.4 








23.3 


55 


3 


! 11 


1.20 


4 


26 


0.3 



CHARGE 2 



■ 76 



Digiiized by Google 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 



Shells, F.K. Gr. and F.H. Gr. 3fi Stg. 
Fuies, A.Z.23v(0.25) r Depp, Z, 5/60*,, and Dopp, Z* S/60 Fl*. 
Muzzle Velocity, 761 fVs — Charge 2 



14 


15 


16 


17 


IB 


1? 


10 


31 


22 


23 


1 


C&rnplfc-mefttlW-y' 
lil< for BflC ll 


Rgn B f *ff m£i of intr*an ot — 




a 
























5 

— 

•s 

1 

+ 


£ 

■a 

1 
> — 

1 


— 

1" 


*, * 

is 

I 5 


"C ■:• 
St 

* -a 

< 




o — 
4 


c "1 


j» _ 

rl 

i 5 

* o 

1 n 


V V -i 

s 


* 

1 








VE 


Temp 


W.R 




F$ 


Hi 


ft 


1 


mil 


mil 




rd 




yd 


yd 




rml 


p . A 

yd 


W 


+ J0 


— .09 




+ 7.3 




+ 0.9 


—2 


87 






3000 


+ .11 

+ .12 
+J 3 
i-.l4 


—JO 
— .1 1 

-12 

i i 

— . i j 




+ 7* 
+ 7.7 

1 ft 
T^tf .U 

+8.2 




+ 0.9 
+ 1.0 

-r- 1 - 1 
+ K1 


—3 
-3 
— j 
-3 


90 
93 
96 
99 






3100 
3200 
3300 
3400 


+ "* 


-.15 




+3.4 




+ 1.2 


-3 


102 






3500 


+ .18 
+ 20 
+.22 
+ .24 


— .T7 
— .T9 
—.21 
^.23 


* 



n 


c 

a 


f e.6 

+ 3.8 

-f- V.U 

+ 9.2 




+ 1.3 
+ 1.3 

L 1 A 

+ 1.5 


—4 
-4 

— 4 
—4 


105 
109 
] 1 2 

1 1 A. 

115 


A 

? 


■ 

_0 


3600 
3700 
3 BOO 
3900 


+ 27 


-.26 


+ 94 


*- 
B 

dp 

a 


+ 1.6 


— J 


119 


D 

ft 


> 
"5 


4000 


+ .31 
+,36 
+ .43 
+ .32 


—.30 
-.34 
-.39 
■^.45 


+ 9.6 
+ 9.8 
+ 10.0 
+ 10.2 


c 
O 
D 

Q 


+ 1.7 
+ 1.8 

+ 2,0 
+ 2.1 


—5 
—5 
— 5 
—4 


123 
127 
131 
136 


E 
D 


c 
a 

I 


4100 
4200 
4300 
4400 


+ .63 


-.52 




+ 10.4 




+ 2.2 


-6 


Ml 






4500 








+ 1 0.6 
+ 10.8 
+ 1 1.0 
+ 1 1.2 




+2,4 
+ 2,5 
+ 2.7 
+ 2.8 


—6 
-7 

—7 


147 

159 
166 






4600 
4700 
4800 

**ao 








+ 11.3 




\ 3.0 


1 


174 






5000 



CHARGE 2 



177 



Digitized by Google uNIVER°SItToF CALIFORNIA 



TM 69-325A 



Shells, F H. Gr. and F.H. Gr. 38 Stg. 
Fuz« f A.Z.23v(Q.25} ( Dopp. Z. S/60*., and Dopp. Z. S/60 Fl*. 
Muzzle Velocity, 866 f/t — Charge 3 





2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


3 t 


12 


13 








• 

*J 

o- 


— 

w 
E 

"1 

X 

El * 

e c 

.5 4 
* r 

P 










DmWi&n 

rTTBCP 


• 

1 


I 

E 
1 
u 




m 

a f* 

> c 

i a 

? ^ 
E TJ 

, ^ 

r 


tip 

s 

u 

1 


• 


■i 


1 

j! 

* 
w 


- 
c 

1 


■ 

o 2 

E ft 

I! 




fi 
0* 

oi 

* _ 

-t— 


w 


| 


El 




C 


mil 


Tim* 








Slope 


1 


Ofi 


W-D 




mil 


mil 


mil 


yd 


HH3 




yd 


mil 


V- 


Mi 


FTll 1 


mil 


o 


—3.0 


2 


6,4 


1 5 


0.0 


9 









1 





0.0 


100 


+3.4 


2 


6.4 


15 


0.3 


9 







152 


1 





0,0 


200 


10.0 


2 


6.6 


15 


0.7 









76 




u 





300 


1 6.6 


2 


6 6 




1 


TO 















0.0 


400 


23.2 


3 


6,6 


15 


1.4 


10 





ft 




36 


| 





0.0 


r r\ 


30.0 


3 


6. a 


15 


3 .7 


10 








30 




1 


0.0 


600 


36.8 


3 


6,6 


15 


2,1 


1 1 





a 


25 


! 


1 


0.0 


700 


43.6 


3 


6.8 


15 


2.4 


1 1 


o 




21 




1 





800 


50.4 


3 

*-* 


7.0 


14 




i r 








1 H A 




1 


0.0 


900 


57.4 


3 


7.0 


14 


3.1 


I 2 





ft 


16,4 


1 


1 


0.0 


1 000 


64.4 


3 


7,0 


1 4 


3.5 


12 








14,7 


1 


1 


0,0 


1100 


71.6 


3 


7.0 


14 


39 


1 2 








13.3 


! 


2 


0,0 


1200 


78.8 


4 


7.2 


14 


4.3 


1 3 


□ 


o 


12.1 


1 


2 


□ 


1300 


66.0 


t 


7 2 




4 6 


13 








1 1 1 




2 


0,0 


1400 


93.2 


4 


7.2 


14 


5.0 


1 4 








10.2 


! 


2 


0,1 


1 500 


1 00.4 


4 


7.4 


1 A 


5.4 


14 





a 


9.5 


1 


2 


1 


1600 


107.8 


4 


7.4 


14 


5,8 


15 








8.8 




3 


0J 


1700 


1 15.2 


4 


7.4 


13 


6.2 


1 5 


o 


i 


6,2 




i 


1 


1800 


122.6 


5 


7 6 


1 3 

1 iJ 


6 5 


16 





l 


7 7 




3 


0.1 


1900 


130.2 


5 


76 


13 


6.9 


16 





l 


7.3 


1 


3 


0,1 


I-. .1-. j-i. j-i 

2000 


1 37.B 


5 


7.6 


13 


7.3 


17 





i 


6,9 




3 


0.1 


3100 


3 45,6 


5 


7.6 


IS 


7.7 


18 





l 


6.5 






0.1 


2200 


1 53,4 


6 


7.8 


13 


e.i 


18 





l 


6J 




4 


0.1 


2300 


161.2 


6 


7.8 


13 


3.4 


19 





l 


5.8 


j 


4 


0.1 


2400 


169.0 


6 


8.0 


13 


8.8 


20 





i 


5.S 




4 


0.1 


2500 


177,0 


6 


8.0 


12 


9.2 


20 





i 


5.2 




5 


0.1 


2600 


1 65.2 


7 


8.2 


12 


9,6 


21 


T 


l 


5.0 




5 


0.1 


2700 


193*4 


7 


8.2 


12 


10,0 


21 


1 


i 


4.8 




5 


0.1 


2600 


201,6 


7 


8.2 


12 


10.5 


22 


3 


l 


4.6 




5 


0.1 


2900 


210,0 


7 


8.4 


12 


10.9 


22 


1 


l 


4.4 




6 


0.1 


3000 


216.4 


9 


6.4 


12 


13.3 


23 


1 


2 


4.2 


1 




0.1 



CHARGE 3 



I7fl 



I Original fram 
0ig,3i M d by ^OOgK UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 



Shells, F K Gr. end F.H. Gf. 38 Slg. 
Fuxei, A.Z.23v{0 25), Dopp. Z. S/6Cs. r and Dopp. Z. S; 60 H*. 
Muxtl* Velocity, B66 f f% — Charge 3 



14 


1 5 


14 


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179 



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CHARGE 3 



180 



Digged by Google uNIVER°SItToF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 



Shell*, F.H, Gr. and F.H. Gr. 3S Stg. 
Fu*«, AX23v(0.25>, Do PP X. S/60$„ and Dopp. Z. 5/60 Fl* 
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Ifll 



Digged by Google uNIVER°SItToF CALIFORNIA 



TNk E9-325A 



Shells, F.H Or. and F.H. Gr. 38 Stg. 
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CHARGE 3 



182 



Digitized by Google 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY' OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 



Shell*, F,H. Gr. and F.H. Gr 38 Stg 
Fuzes, A,Z.23v(0 + 25), Dopp. Z. S/60s., and Dopp. Z. S/60 Fl*. 
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Duma* by ^OOglC UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 



Shells, F.H. Gr. and F.H. Gr. 38 Stg. 
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2300 


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2900 


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3000 


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3 


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17 


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6.0 


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CHARGE 4 



184 



Digitized by Google 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY' OF CALIFORNIA 



TM I9-325A 



S h © 1 1 i r F , H . G r ond F »H ■ G t ■ 38 S t tj . 
Fym, A,Z,23v(0.25), Dopp, Z. S/6O1., and Dopp Z. S/60 fl* 
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50 
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53 






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62 
63 
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2600 
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67 






1000 



CHARGE 4 



185 



Dtftlrod by Ci KJgfe umvERSrnrOF CJMJFORKtA 



Shell*, F*H. Gr. and F.H. Gf. 58 $tg. 
Fuiti. A.Z.23v<0-25), Dopp. I. 5/40*,, and Dopp Z. 5/ 60 Fl* 
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3100 
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157,6 
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3500 


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3600 
3700 
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188.0 
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1 4.8 
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5 
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4000 


213.2 


3 


6,4 


15 


13.0 


1 2 




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6 


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4100 
4200 
4300 
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219.6 
226.2 
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6.6 

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15 
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4500 


246.4 


4 


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15 


14.9 


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3.5 


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7 


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4400 
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4100 
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253.4 
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262.0 




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5300 
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209.4 
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320.4 


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190 


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5400 
5700 
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324.4 
336.1 
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8.2 
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194 

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15 
15 
16 
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3 
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9 
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0.2 
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4000 


342.8 


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11 


21.3 


14 


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1 


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0.2 



CHARGE 4 



186 



uripirul from 
UNIVERSITY OF CAUF0RNIA 



TM I9-325A 



Shellt, F,H, Or. and F.H. Gr. 38 Stg, 
Fuiet, A.Z.23v(0.25), Dopp. Z. S/60i. r and Depp. Z. S/60 Fl*. 
Muzzle Velocity, 1040 f /* — Charge 4 



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77 






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124 

127 
129 
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5700 
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134 






6000 



CHARGE 4 



187 



Digged * Google UWVEfiSfh^OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 



Shell*, TM. Gr. and F.h\ Gr 38 Stg. 
Fuzes, A.Z.23v(0,25), Dopp. Z, S/60s., and Dopp. Z. 5/60 Fl*. 
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419.6 
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462.8 


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11.6 


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26.6 


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7100 
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27,2 
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19 
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15 
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527,2 


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29.9 


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1.42 


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7600 
7700 
7800 
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542.4 
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14 

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17 
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15.6 
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307 
31.4 
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617.6 


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25 
26 
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109 
1,04 
0.99 


5 
5 
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23 
25 
28 


0.4 
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CHARGE 4 



166 



Digitized by Google 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY' OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 



5Wfs f F.H. Gr. and F.H. Gr. 38 Stg. 
Fums, AX23v(0.25>, Depp. Z. S/oOs. and Dopp, Z. S/60 Ft* 
Muzzle Velocity, 1040 f/* — Charge 4 



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137 
139 
142 
145 






6100 
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6300 
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148 






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151 
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— 14 
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167 
171 
175 
179 


7100 
7200 
7300 
7400 


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183 






7500 




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187 

197 
202 






7600 
7700 
7800 
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-17 


208 






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+9,5 
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+9.0 
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-17 
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215 
224 
236 






8100 
8200 
B300 



CHARGE 4 



169 



Digitized by Google 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY' OF CALIFORNIA 



TM I9-325A 



Sh*1lt, F.H + Gr and F.H Gr. 38 Stg 
Fuim, AX23v(0.25) t Dopp. Z. S 60i. r anil Depp. Z. S/60 Fl* 
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19.5 




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17.9 




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1700 


53.6 




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2000 


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2900 


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NOTE; ChoFg» 5 ii ol» a 



1 em P z g r 

CHARGE 5 

190 



■.^ wilK fut# d Bd. 2. 10 en. 



UWVERSfTt Of CALIFORNIA 



m £9-3 25 A 



Shtlf*, F.H. Gr* and F.H. Gr, 38 Stg, 
tmm, A.Z.23y(0,25), Dopp. Z. S/60*„ and Dopp. Z, S/60 Fl*. 
Muzzle Velocity, 1283 f/i — Charge 5 



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2100 
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54 
56 
57 
59 






2600 
2700 
2800 
2900 


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3000 



NOT?; Charge 5 ii alio applicable lo projectile 10 cm. Fipr., with fu», Bd. I. F. 10 cm. Pior., to 

CHARGE 5 



191 



Digged by L*OOglC UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM EG-325A 



Sh#IU r F.H. Gr. and F.H. Gr, 38 Stg. 
F«m» A.Z.23v(0,2S> # Dopp. Z. S/60f +l and Dopp. Z. S/60 Fl*. 
Muzzlft Velocity, 1283 f/i — Charge 5 



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4200 


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4.6 


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4300 


174.2 


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19 


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4.6 


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4400 


179.6 


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4,3 


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4600 


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18 


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3 


4700 


196.0 


2 


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4800 


201.6 


2 


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5100 


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3.7 


2 


6 


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5200 


224.2 


7 


5.8 


17 


15.6 


8 


2 





3.6 


2 


6 


0.3 


5300 


230.0 


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17 


16 


ft 


2 





3.5 


2 


6 


0.3 




235.1 




5.8 


17 


16.3 


8 


2 





3.4 


2 


6 


0.3 


5500 


• 241.6 


2 


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17 


167 


ft 


2 





3 3 


2 




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5600 


247,8 


2 


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17 


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3.2 


2 




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253,8 


2 


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16 


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5800 


260.0 


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3,1 


2 


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0.3 


5900 


266 2 


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3.0 


2 


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6000 


271 A 


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16 


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192 



DiQiTJiwf by Google 



Ordinal (Vom 
IJNIVEflSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 



Shftllt, F.H. Gr. and F.H* Gr. 36 Stg> 
Fuiei, AX23v{0.25), Depp. Z. $/60«. r and Dopp. Z, S/60 Fl* 
Muzzle Velocity, 1283 f/s — Charge 5 



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+ AY 


c 

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3000 


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+ 2.8 
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+ 3,1 
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63 
65 
66 
68 






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3200 
3300 
3400 


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3500 


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72 
73 
75 
77 






3600 
3700 
3800 
3900 


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93 
95 
97 


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5000 


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101 

103 
105 
107 






5100 
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5300 
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109 






5500 


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111 
1 13 
l \6 
1 18 






5600 
5700 
5800 
5900 


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1 —,05 




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+ 7.4 


-13 


120 






6000 



CHARGE 5 



193 



Digitized by Google 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY' OF CALIFORNIA 



Shells, F,H. Gr. and F.H. Or. 38 Stg, 
Fuze*, A.Z,23v(0-25), Dopp. Z. S/60*., and Dopp. 2. S/60 Fl*. 
Muni* Velocity, 1283 f/% — Charge 5 



1 


a 


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4 


5 




7 


1 




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15 


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6000 


272.4 


2 


6.4 


16 


18.6 


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2.9 


2 


a 


0.3 


6100 
6200 
6300 


278.8 
265.2 

291,8 


2 

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0.3 

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6500 


305.0 


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20* 


9 


2 


1 


2,5 


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6600 

6700 

6800 
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318,6 
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7000 


340.0 


3 


7 + 2 


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22.7 


10 


3 


1 


2 3 


3 


10 


0.4 


7100 
7200 
7300 


347.2 
354.6 
362.2 


3 
3 
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7,4 

7.6 
7,6 


14 

1 3 

13 
l J 


23,1 
23,6 
24.0 


10 

TO 

11 


3 
3 
j 
3 




2.2 
2,2 
2,1 
1 


3 
3 

3 

3 


10 

10 
1 1 

11 


0.4 
0.4 
fl 4 

0.4 


7500 


378.0 


J 


8.0 


13 


24,9 


11 


3 


— ^ 


2.0 


3 


11 


0.4 


7600 
7700 
7800 


386,0 
394.2 
402.4 

4 1 1 .U 


4 


6,2 
8.2 
8.4 

6,6 


12 
1 2 
12 
T2 


25.4 
25.8 
26,3 

26-8 


1 1 
11 
1 1 

1 1 


3 

3 

4 




1.95 
1.91 
1,64 

i d 1 

1,61 


3 
3 

3 

3 


12 
12 
1 5 

13 


0.4 
0.4 
O 4 

0.4 


8000 


420.0 


i 


9.0 


Tl 


27.3 


12 






1.77 


4 


13 


0.4 


8100 
8200 
8300 
8400 


4290 
436-2 
447.6 
457.4 


5 
5 


9.2 
9.4 

9.6 
10.0 


11 

1 t 

10 
10 


27.8 
28.4 
289 
29,4 


12 
12 
12 
13 






1.73 
1.69 
1.64 
1.60 




13 
14 
14 

15 


0.4 
0.4 
0.4 
0.4 


8500 


467.6 


5 


10.4 


10 


30.0 


13 






1.56 




15 


0.5 


8600 
6700 

seoo 

8900 


478,0 
488,8 

500.0 
5H.6 


6 
6 
6 
7 


1 10.6 
1 1.0 

ii, a 


9 
9 
9 
B 


30.6 
31.2 
31-8 
32,4 


13 
14 
14 

15 


5 

5 
5 




1.52 
1 .48 

1.43 
T.39 




15 
16 
16 
17 


0,5 
0.5 
0.5 
0,5 


9000 


523.8 


7 


(2.4 


8 


33.0 


13 


5 


1 


1.35 


4 


T7 


0,5 



CHARGE 5 



194 



Digitized by Google 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY' OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 



Shells, F,H. Gr. and F.H, Or. 38 Stg, 
Fuiei, A.Z,23v{0.25), Depp. 2, S/60*. f end Dopp Z. S/60 Fl* 
Muzzle Velocity, 1283 f/t — Charge 5 



M 


15 


14 


17 


IB 


III 


20 


21 


32 


23 


i 


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Range •ff«cr of intr.c.1. *f— 




fl 




























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VE 


T*rnp 


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Hi 


i 


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ii 


yd 


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i« 


mil 


yd 






-.05 




+4,7 




+7,4 


-13 


120 






4000 


+ .07 
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+.oa 

+ ,0? 


-.04 

-.04 
- 07 




+ 4.8 
+ 4.8 
+4.9 
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+7.5 
+ 7.7 
+ 7.9 
+ 8.1 


— 1 4 
-14 

- 14 
-15 


122 
1 24 
126 
129 






6100 
6200 
6300 
6400 


+ ,09 


-.07 




+ 5.0 




+ 8,2 


-15 


131 






6500 


+.10 
+J0 

+-11 
+.11 


- ,07 
-.08 
-.OS 
- + 09 




+5.0 
+5.0 
+5J 
+5.1 




+8.4 
+8 + 6 
+8.8 
+9.0 


-15 
-14 
-16 
-14 


133 
1 36 
138 
141 






4600 
6700 
6800 
6900 


+.12 


-.09 




+5,2 




+9.1 


-T7 


143 






7000 


+ .13 
+ .!3 
+ .14 
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-.10 
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-17 
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144 
1 48 

151 
153 


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7100 
7200 
7300 
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-19 


154 


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-.14 
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-.17 
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■ 

a 
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+5.4 
+5.3 
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C 

5 

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+ 10.3 
+ 10.5 

+ 10,7 
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-19 
-19 
-20 
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159 
141 
144 
147 


c 
p 
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c 

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7600 
77 vQ 
7800 
7900 








-+- J.O 




hi i 


— J. i 


170 






8000 


+.25 
+.27 
+.29 
+ .31 


-.20 
-.22 
-.24 

-.25 




+5.7 
+5.7 
+5.8 

+5.e 




+ 11.2 
+ 11.4 
+ U.4 
+ U.8 


-21 
-22 
-22 
-22 


173 
T76 
179 






8100 
8200 
8300 
8400 


+.34 


-.27 




+5.9 




+ 12.) 


-23 


185 






S500 


+,37 
+ .40 
+.44 
+ .48 


-.29 
-.31 
-.34 

-.37 




+5.9 
+ 4.0 

+ 4.0 
+ 4.1 




+ 12.3 
+ 12.5 
+ 12.7 
+ 12,9 


-23 
-24 

-25 
-25 


188 

192 
T95 
198 






86O0 
9700 
6800 
8900 


+.53 


-.40 




+4.1 




+ 13,1 


-24 


202 






9000 



CHARGE 5 



195 



, , /"^rtnLj* Original from 

Dig.lizorJ by ^OOgK UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9 325A 



Shells, F.K. Gr. and F.H. Gr. 38 Stg. 
Fines, AXaavtO.aS), Dapp. I, 5/60*., and Dopp. Z. S/60 Fl*. 
Murxle Velocity, 1283 f /s — Charge 5 



1 


2 


1 


4 


5 


6 


7 


ft 




10 


11 


12 


13 








if 


c 

ii 

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t 

n 

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error 






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• 

c 


c 

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SJopa 


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W.D 


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mil 


mil 


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1 


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9000 


523,8 


7 


12.4 


8 


33-0 


15 


5 


1 


1.35 


4 


17 


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9100 




6 


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33,7 


16 


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1.31 


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9200 


549 6 


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34 4 


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1.27 


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18 


0.5 


9300 


563.8 


10 


7 4.6 


7 


35,1 


17 


6 


2 


1.23 


5 


19 


0.5 


9400 


578.8 


1 1 


15.6 


6 


35.9 


17 


6 


2 


1.19 


5 


20 


0,5 


9500 


595.0 


1 2 


170 


6 


36,7 


18 


6 


2 


1.15 


5 


20 


0.5 


9600 


6 1 2.8 


14 




5 


37.6 


19 


6 


2 


U 1 


5 


21 


0.5 


9700 


632.8 


17 


21.4 


5 


38.5 


20 


7 


2 


i.oa 


6 


22 


0.5 


9800 


656.4 


22 


26.0 


4 


39.5 


21 


7 


2 


1,05 


6 


23 


0,6 


9900 


6366 


31 


35.4 


3 


40.9 


22 


7 


2 


1.02 


6 


25 


0.6 


10000 


731 2 








43.6 


23 


7 


2 


0.99 


6 


28 


0,6 



CHARGE S 



196 



, , /^"^rtnlij* Original from 

Dig.lizorJ by l»OOgk UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E*-325A 



Shells, F.H. Gr. and F.H. Gr. 38 Stg. 
Fuzei, AX23v(0.25), Do pp. Z. S/60*., and Dopp. I* S/60 Fl*. 
Muiz|« Velocity, 1283 f i — Charge 5 



u 


ii 


16 


17 






20 


Jl 


27 


23 


l 


angle of 
lit* for each 


Rang* *ff«cf of <n<r+a<« fit- 


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a 

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mil 


yd 


■ 

yd 




j 

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yd 








yd 


+♦53 


-.40 




+ 6.1 




+ 13.1 


-26 


202 






9000 


+♦67 
+ .76 
+.98 


-.44 
-.50 
-.57 
-.66 


• 

la 
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+ 6.2 
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* 

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+ 13.3 
+ 13.5 
+ 13.6 
+ 13 + 8 


-26 
-27 
-27 
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206 
210 
215 
21? 


V 

3 
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1 

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> 
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9100 
9200 
9300 
9400 


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+ 6.4 


+ 14.0 


-29 


224 


9500 






+ 6.4 
+6.5 
+ 6.5 
+ 66 


+ 14.2 
+ 14.4 
+ 14.6 
+ 14,8 


-29 
-30 
-31 

-32 


230 
237 
245 
254 


9600 
9700 
9800 
9900 








+ 6.7 




+ 15.0 


-33 


264 






10000 



CHARGE 5 



[9? 



I nnnlf* Original rroni 

Digged by V.*UU£lt UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 



SKells r F.H. Gr. and F.H. Or, 30 Stg. 
Fuwt, A,Z,23v(0.25), Dopp Z, S/60*., and Dopp. Z, 5/60 Fl*. 
Muzzle Velocity, 1542 f/t — Charge 6 



1 


3 


3 




3 


& 


7 


t 


9 


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hin, 


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6000 


203.6 


2 


50 


22 


16.4 


8 


1 





35 


2 


6 


0.4 


6100 
6200 
6300 
6400 


208.6 
213 J 
219.0 
224.4 


2 
2 

a 

2 


5.2 
S.2 
5,2 
5.4 


19 
19 
19 
19 


14.7 
17.1 
17,4 
17.8 


• 
8 
8 
9 


1 

1 
1 
1 










3.4 
3,3 
3.3 
3.2 


2 
2 

2 
2 


6 
6 
6 


0.4 
0.4 
0.4 

0.4 


6500 


229.1 


2 


5,4 


18 


IB-2 


9 


1 


1 


3.1 


2 


6 


0.4 


6600 
6700 
6800 
6900 


235.2 
2 40. a 
246.4 
252.0 


2 

a 

3 
2 


5.4 

5-6 

5.6 


IB 
18 
19 

18 


1B.6 

18,9 
19,3 
19.6 


9 
9 
9 
10 


1 

2 
2 

2 


1 
1 
1 
1 


3.0 
2.9 
2.9 
2.8 


2 
2 
3 
3 


7 
7 
7 
7 


0.4 
0.4 
0.4 
0.4 


7000 


257.B 


2 


5.8 


17 


20.0 


10 


2 


1 


2.7 


3 


7 


0.4 


7100 
7200 
7300 
74 00 


243.6 
269.4 
275.4 
281.4 


2 
2 
2 
3 


5 6 

5.8 
6.0 

6.0 


17 
17 
17 

17 


20.3 
20,7 
2U 
21.4 


10 
10 
10 
11 


2 
2 

2 
2 


1 
1 
1 

1 


2.6 
2.4 
2.5 
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3 
3 
3 
3 


7 
7 
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0.4 
0,4 
0.4 
0.4 




287 4 


3 


6 2 


16 


21 8 


11 


2 


1 


2.4 


3 


8 


' 

0.4 


7400 
7700 

7aoo 

7900 


293.6 
299.8 
306.0 
312 4 


3 

3 
3 
3 


6.2 
4.4 
6,4 


16 
16 
16 
14 


22.2 
22 + 4 
23.0 
23.4 


11 
1 I 
Tl 
12 


2 

a 

2 
2 


1 
1 
1 
1 


2.4 

2 1 

2,3 
2.2 


3 
3 
3 

3 


8 
8 
8 

9 


0,4 
0,4 
0.4 
0.5 


8000 


318.8 


3 


6,4 


15 


23.8 


12 


2 


1 


2.2 


3 


9 


0.5 


a loo 

8200 

a 300 

8400 


325.4 
332.0 
338 6 
345.4 


3 
3 
3 
4 


6,6 
4.4 
6.6 
6.8 


15 
15 
15 
15 


24,2 
24.6 
25.0 
25.5 


12 
12 
13 
13 


2 
2 
2 
2 


1 
1 
1 

1 


2.2 
2.1 

2.1 
2,0 


3 

3 
3 
3 


9 
9 
10 
10 


0.5 
0.5 
0,5 
0,5 


8500 


352,2 


4 


6.8 


14 


25.9 


ED 


2 


1 


1.96 


3 


10 


0.5 


8600 
8700 
8800 
8900 


359.2 
366.2 
3734 
380.6 


4 
4 

4 
4 


7.0 
7.2 
7.2 
7.4 


14 
14 
14 
14 


26.3 
26.8 

27.2 
27.6 


14 
14 
14 
15 


2 
3 
3 
3 


1 
1 
1 

i 


1.92 
1.88 
1 85 
1,B1 


3 
3 
3 
4 


1 V 

1 1 
11 
11 


0.5 
0.5 
0.5 
0.5 


9000 | 318.0 | 


5 


7,4 


13 28.1 


15 


3 


i 


1,77 


* 


12 





HOTEi C^po*fl* 4 ii noT to hit fVr#d below 200 mi3i tlavalian. 

CHARGE 6 



198 



TM W-325A 



Shellt, F.H, Gr. and F.H, Gr. 38 Stg. 
Fuiei, A,Z.23v(0 + 25), Dopp. Z. S/60s. P and Dopp, Z. S/60 Fl*. 
Muzzle Velocity, 1542 f/* — Charge 6 





15 


14 


I? 


i i 


19 


10 


21 


n 


33 




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angle of 

lit* ff\r HFirh 






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1 


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t 1 
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11 


■ 

t 






wt 


VE 


Temp 






FS 


HI 


i 


R 


•nil 




yd 


yd 


yd 




yd 


if( 


mil 


y4 




+ 04 


-.03 




+ 4.3 




+ 4,8 


-17 


108 






6000 


+ .04 
+.04 
+,05 
+ .05 


-.03 
-.03 
-.04 
■ .04 




+4,9 
+4.9 
+4.9 
+4.9 




+5.0 
+5.2 
+5.4 
+5.6 


-17 
- 1 8 

— 1 D 

->9 


1 1 1 
1 13 

1 1 c 

1 1 -5 

1 17 






6100 
6200 

64Q0 


+ .05 


-.04 




1 AS 




+5.e 


-19 


119 






6500 


+ .06 
+.06 
+,06 
+.07 


-.05 
-.05 
-.05 
- .06 




+4,9 
+5.0 
+ 5,0 
+5.0 




+6.0 
+6.3 
+ 6.5 
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-20 

-20 
— 50 

-21 


121 

123 
1 *>A 
128 






6600 
6700 
6800 
6900 


+.07 


-.06 




+5.0 




+6.9 


-21 


130 






7000 


+.07 
+.03 

+.oa 

+ .09 


-,06 
-.07 
-.07 
-.08 




+ 5.0 
+ 5.0 
+5.0 
+ 5.1 


| 


+ 7.1 
+7.4 
+7,6 
+7.8 


-22 
-22 
— 5"i 

-23 


132 
134 

139 


_o 

i — 

D 


_£ 
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JJ 

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7100 
7200 
7300 
7400 


+ .09 


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i 

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> 
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7500 


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+ 5.1 
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+ 6.3 
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-24 
-24 

— 51 

-25 


143 
145 
1 Aft 

150 


c 

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c 

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7600 
7700 
7800 
7900 


i +.13 


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+ 5.1 




+ 9.5 


-26 


152 






8000 


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-.11 

^.12 




+5,2 
+5,2 
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-26 
-27 

— 57 
-28 


154 

157 
1 59 
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8 100 
6200 
8300 
8400 


+.15 


-.12 




4 5.2 




+ 10,3 


-28 


164 






8500 


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+♦16 
+.17 

+.17 


-.13 
-.1 3 
-.14 
-^14 




+ 5,2 
+ 5.3 

+ 5.3 
+ 5.3 




+ 10,5 
+ 10.7 
+ 11.0 
+ 11 .2 


-29 
-29 
-30 
-30 


167 
169 
172 
174 






8600 
8700 
8800 
8900 


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— , 


-15 




+ 5.3 




f 1 1.4 


-31 


177 






9000 



CHARGE 6 



199 



, , /^"^rtnlij* Original from 

Oig.nzed by ^OOgK UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



VINHOdlTttdO.UOTAINn 



9 mmm 





Q7 


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TM E9-325A 



Shells, F.H, Gr. and F.H. Gr. 38 Stg. 
Fuxei, A.Z.23v(0.25), Dopp. Z S/60s., and Dopp, Z, S/60 FI+ 
Muzzle Velocity, 1542 f/i — Charge 6 



14 


15 


U 


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1 


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20 


51 


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23 


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1 frt 


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+ Jh J 




+ 11.4 


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9000 


+ .19 
+.30 


-.16 
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in 

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+w 

+ 5.4 
+ 5,4 

+ J-* 




+ 11.7 
+ 11.9 
+ 131 

+ 1 /. J 1 


-32 
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— j j 


180 
112 

its 

1 88 






9100 
9200 
9300 
9400 


+ ./ J 


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J ( J 




1 1 Z .3 




191 






9500 


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194 

197 
200 
203 






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9700 
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+ 14.1 

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+ 1 4.J 


-37 
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209 
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□ 


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10 200 
10300 
1 0400 


+ .47 


— - JO 


I 

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+ J./ 





MIX 
1 ^tV 


— J V 


223 


E 
— 


I 

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1 0500 




-.43 

-.48 

-.53 


C 

Q 

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+ 5.7 
+ 5.7 
+ 58 
+ 5 8 


i 


+ 14.8 

+ 15.0 

+ T5J 
+ T5.4 


-40 
-41 
-42 
-42 


227 
231 
235 
239 

ftt F 


£ 


10600 
IQ700 

10800 
1 0900 




-.67 




+ 5 + 8 




+ 1S.8 


-43 


243 






\ 1000 






* 


+ 5.8 
+5 + 9 
+ 59 
+ S.9 




+ 14.1 
+ 14.4 
+ 146 
+ 16 9 


-44 

-45 
— 46 
-47 


348 

253 
259 
265 






moo 

11300 
1 1300 
1 1400 









+ 60 




+ 17,1 


-48 


273 






! 1500 








+ 6.0 




+ 17.4 


-50 


263 






M60Q 



CHARGE 6 



201 



OftttaHJ t* C.< >t >gle UNIVERSITY OF CMJFORNlA 



TM IW25A 



- 



This page has been left blank intentionally 



202 



TM EM25A 



LIGHT FIELD HOWITZER, 105-MM (GERMAN) 

FIRING 

FIELD HOWITZER SHELL, SMOKE (F.H. Gr. Nb,J 
RANGE — ELEVATION RELATION 

NOTE: All otW trajectory data and ■fftcti an Hi* mmi ai thai* liitvd far th* High 
Explain* Shtll {F.H. Gr.). 



Digitized by Google 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY' OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 



Shall F.H. Gr. ISIb, 
Fuze, Id. A.Z. 23 Nb, 
Muzzle Velocity, 656 f /* — Charge 1 



Rang* 






milt 


o 


— 5.0 




+5 2 


200 


15.S 


300 


26.4 


400 


37.2 


500 

J u u 


48 


600 


59 


700 


70.0 


eoo 


B0. 2 


900 


92.6 




1 04.2 


1 100 


1 1 A 


1200 


128.0 


1300 


140.2 


1400 


152.4 




1 500 


1 65.2 


1600 

1 WW 


177,8 


1700 


190,6 


1800 


203.8 


1000 


217.2 


2000 


230.8 


2100 


244.6 


2200 


258 8 


2 300 


273,2 


2400 


268,0 


2500 


303.2 



Rang* 

yard* 


Elation 
milt 


2500 


303 2 


2600 
2700 
2800 
2900 


319,0 
335.2 
352.0 
369.4 


3000 


387.6 


3100 
3200 
3300 
3400 


407,0 
427,6 
449.4 
472.4 


3500 


497.0 


3600 
3700 
3800 
3900 


524.0 
553,8 
587,6 
628,2 


4000 


691.8 



CHARGE 1 

204 



Digitized by GoOgll 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 



Shall, F.H, Gr Nb. 
Fine, kf. AX 23 Nb. 
Muill* VdMity, 7*1 f/*— Charge 2 



Kong* 






knng • 






mill 




yard i 


mill 


o 


— 4.0 




2500 


219.A 


100 


+ 4,0 




2600 


230.2 


200 


12.0 




2700 


240,8 


300 


20.2 




2800 


25 K6 


400 


28,4 




2900 


262.6 


500 






3000 


273.8 


ADO 


44J 




3100 


285.4 


700 


33.0 




3200 


297.4 


800 


61,4 




3300 


309.6 


900 


69, B 




3400 


322.2 


1000 


78.2 




3500 


335.2 


1 100 


84.8 




3600 


348,6 


1200 


95.4 




3700 


362.4 


1300 


104.2 




3800 


376.8 


1400 


113.0 




3900 


391.8 


1500 


1 220 




4000 


407.2 


1600 


131.2 




4100 


423,2 


1700 


140.4 




4200 


439.8 


1800 


1 49.8 




4 300 


457.2 


1900 


U9.4 




4400 


475.8 


! 2000 


| 1692 




4500 


495.6 


2100 


179.0 




4600 


5168 


2300 


1 69.0 




4700 


540.0 


2300 


199.2 




4800 


566.0 


2400 


209.4 




4900 


595.8 


2500 

, 


219J 




5000 


632.2 



CHARGE 2 

205 



UNIVERSITY W CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 



Shell, F,H. Gr. Nb. 
Fuze, kl. AX 23 Nb. 
Muzzle Velocity, 866 f/s — Charge 3 



Rang* 

yard* 


Elevation 
milt 





-3.0 


100 
200 
300 
400 


+ 3.0 
9.2 
15.4 
21.6 


500 


2B.0 


600 
700 

eoo 

900 


34,4 
40.8 
47.4 
54.2 


1000 


60.S 


1 100 
1200 
1300 
1400 


67.6 
74 + 4 
81.4 
88.4 


1500 


95.4 


1600 
1700 
1SO0 
1900 


102.4 
109,4 
1 16.6 
123.8 


2000 


131 2 


2100 
2200 
2300 
2400 


138.6 
146,2 
153,8 
161.4 


2500 


1 69.0 







yordi 


mill 




1 ov.u 


9Ann 


1 7 A J) 


2700 


1 84,6 


2600 


192.6 


2900 


200.6 


juuy 




J 1 uu 




3200 


22 5.0 


3300 


2334 


3400 


242,0 




3 50 h 




3 AO 4. 


3700 


26B.4 


3 BOO 


277,6 


3900 


287.0 




7QA J. 


4 TOO 


304.0 


4200 


315.8 


4300 


325 8 


J 400 


336.2 


4500 


347.0 


4600 


35B.2 


4700 


369.8 


4S00 
4 9G0 


381.8 
394,2 


5000 


407.0 





Elavafton 




mill 


5000 


407 


5 1 00 


420.4 


5200 


434,2 


5300 


448.4 


5400 


463.0 


5500 


47ft 4 


5600 


494J 






5300 


531.8 


5900 


552.6 


6000 


575,0 


6100 


599.4 


6200 


627.4 


6300 


664.0 



CHARGE 3 

206 



Prtnnl^ Original from 

Digged by V.»OU}}lt UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM W-325A 



Sh«1l, F.H. Gr, Nb. 
Fum, kl. A.Z. 23 Nb. 
Mu«U Velodry, 1040 f/f — Charg* 4 



lung a 






Ion?* 






mill 






hull 





-3,0 




_ _ _ 

3000 


146.6 


100 


+ 1.4 




3100 


152.4 


ioo 


5.* 




3200 


1 58.2 


300 


10.2 




3300 


164.0 


400 

^ ^ » 


14.6 




3400 


1 70.0 

' * if L ** 


500 


19.2 




3500 


174,0 


600 






3400 


1B2.0 


700 


28.4 




3700 


IBB. 2 


BOO 


33.0 




3 BOO 


194.4 


900 


37.6 




3900 


200.6 


1000 


42,2 




4000 


206 a 


1 1 00 


*7.0 




4 1 00 


213.2 


1200 


51. S 




4200 


It 9.6 


1300 


56.6 




4300 


226.2 


MOO 


61,6 




4400 


232.8 


1 500 


66.6 




4500 


239,4 


1600 


71.4 




4600 


246.4 


\ 700 


76.4 




4700 


253.2 


!B00 


§1.4 




4800 


240.2 


1900 


04.B 




4900 


247.4 


2000 


92.0 




5000 


274.4 


3100 


97,2 




5 1 00 


282,0 


2300 


102,4 




5 200 


2B9.4 


2300 


i07.a 




5300 


297,0 


2400 


113.2 




5400 


304.8 


2500 


118.6 




5500 


312.6 


2600 


124.2 




5400 


320.6 




129 a 




5700 


32B.B 


2aoo 


135.4 




5 BOO 


337.2 


2900 


141.0 




5900 


345.8 


3000 


144.4 




6000 


354.4 



Song* 


El**atbn 


vur J* 


mill 


6000 


354.4 


6100 


363,2 


6200 


372.4 


6300 


361.8 


6400 


391 4 


4500 


401*2 


6400 


41 1 + 4 


4700 


421.9 


6B00 


432.4 


6900 


443.2 


7000 


454.4 


7100 


466,2 


7200 


478.4 


7300 


491.0 


7400 


50 4.0 


7500 


517,8 


7600 


532.6 


7700 


548.6 


7800 


565 8 


7900 


584 t 4 


8000 


604,6 


8100 


627,2 


6200 


654.8 


8300 


697.6 



CHARGE 4 

207 



Of>0^rifl[ from 
UNIVERSITY W CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 



Shell, F.H. Gr. Nb* 
Fuze, kf. AX 23 Nb, 
Muzzle Velocity, 1283 f/s — Charge 5 



Rang* 


£levaljen 


■Win j rim 


mill 





-4.0 


ICQ 


-1.2 


200 


+ 1,6 


300 


4.6 


400 


7,6 


500 


10.6 


600 


1 3.6 


700 


16,6 


BOO 


19.8 


900 


23,0 


1000 


26.4 


1100 


29J 


1200 


33,2 


1300 


3 6. a 


1400 


40.4 


1500 44.0 


1600 


47.6 


1700 


51 ,4 


i eoo 


55.2 


1900 


59.2 


2000 


63,2 


2100 


6A2 


2200 


71.2 


2300 


75.4 


2400 


79.6 


2500 


83,8 


2600 


83.2 


2700 


92.6 


2800 


97.0 


2900 


101.6 


3000 


106.2 


3100 


1 lo.a 


3200 


1 1 5,4 


3300 


120.0 


3400 


124,8 


3500 


129.4 



Rang* 

jaw ax 


Elivotion 

srin a- 


3 500 


129,6 


3 600 
3700 
3800 
3900 


134.6 
1 39.6 
144.6 
1 49.6 


4000 


T54.8 


4100 
4200 
4300 
4400 


160,0 
165.2 
170.4 
1 75.8 


4500 


181.2 


4600 
4700 
4800 
4900 


186,6 
1 92.0 
197.6 
203.2 


5000 


208.8 


5100 
5200 
5300 
5400 


214,4 

220,2 
226.0 
232.0 


5500 


238.0 


5600 
5700 
5800 
5900 


244.0 
250.0 
256.2 
262.4 


6000 


268.6 


6100 
6700 
6300 
6400 


275,0 
281.4 
287.8 

294.4 


6500 


30V,0 


6600 
6700 
6800 
6900 


307.8 
314.8 
32l.fi 


7000 


336.0 





FJ tv alien 

mill 
...... 


hj n fjH ■ 

y or u i- 


7000 


336.0 


71 00 


343.4 


7200 


350.8 


7300 


358,4 


1 7400 


366.2 


7500 


374.2 


7600 


382.2 


7700 


390.2 


7800 


398.4 


7900 


407,0 


8000 


415.8 


8100 


424,8 


8200 


434.0 


8300 


443.6 


8400 


453,4 


6 500 


463.6 


8600 


474.0 


8700 


484.8 


8800 


496.0 


8900 


507.6 


9000 


5 1 9,8 


9100 


532.6 


9200 


546,0 


9300 


560,2 


9400 


575.4 


9500 


591,6 


9600 


609.2 


9700 


628.6 


9800 


650.6 


9900 


680,6 



CHARGE 5 

208 



DlgiiiretJ by Google 



Original From 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 



Shell, F.H. Gr. Nb. 
Fu*e, k\. A.Z 23 Nb. 
Muzzle Velocity, 1542 f /s _ Charge 6 









mill 


6000 


301 A 


i 3 00 


t n a R 


6200 


212,0 


6300 


2T7.4 


6400 


222.8 


6500 
w w 


x. A. D _ j- 


6600 


233.B 


6700 


239,4 


6800 


245.0 


6500 


250.6 


7000 




71 00 




7200 


Z68.0 


7300 
7400 


274.0 
2 60.0 


7500 


2 BA ? 


7600 


292,4 


7700 


29B,4 


7800 


305.0 


7900 


31 1.4 


BOOO 


3 1 7 ft 


SI 00 


3 74 A 

y £ -H -■*+ 


8200 


33T,0 


8300 
8400 


337.8 
3 4 4.6 


3500 


35L4 


8600 


358.4 


8700 


365,6 


8600 


372.8 


8900 


380,2 


9000 


3 87,6 





Elevation 


9000 


3 87,6 


9100 
9200 
9300 
9400 


395.2 
403.0 
410.8 

418 a 


9500 


427.0 


9600 
9700 
9 B00 
9900 


435.2 
443.6 
452.4 
461,4 


10000 


470.6 


10100 
10200 
10300 
10400 


480.0 
489,8 

500,0 
51 0,6 


10500 


621.6 


1 0600 
10700 

ioeoo 

10900 


533,0 
545.0 
557.9 
571.2 


1 1000 


585 6 


I 1 100 

I I 200 
1 1300 
11400 


601.2 
61 8,2 
637.2 

659.2 


1 1500 


685.6 



NOTE: Charge 6 if nat lo be fired below 200 mil* elevation. 



CHARGE 6 

209 



Digitized by Google 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY' OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 
78 



78, UN EAR CONVERSION TABLES 



table i. 





Y«r44 


Mala n 


Yy4i 








100 
200 
300 
400 


109,36 
216.72 
326.08 
437.44 


3100 
3200 
3300 
3400 


3390.2 
3499 6 
3600.9 
3718,3 


6100 

6200 
6300 
6400 


6671 .0 
6780 4 
66B9.7 
6999.1 


9100 
9200 
9300 
9400 


9951.9 
10061. 
I0171 t 
10280. 


500 


546.81 


3500 


3827.6 


6500 


7108.5 


9500 


\ 3 9 1 


600 
700 
600 
000 


656 18 
765,53 
874. 89 
984.25 


3600 
3700 
3800 
3900 


3937.0 
4046.4 
4155,7 
4265,1 


6600 
6700 
6600 
6900 


7217.8 
7327 + 2 
7436 6 
7545,9 


9600 
9700 
9800 
9900 


1 0499. 
10608. 
1 07 1 7, 
10827. 


1000 


1093.61 


4000 


4374 4 


?ooo 


7655.3 


10000 


10936. 


1 100 
1200 
1300 
1400 


1703.0 
1312.3 
142J.7 
1531.1 


4100 
4200 
4300 
4400 


4483.8 

4593.2 
4702.5 
4811.9 


7100 
7200 
7300 
7400 


7764.6 
7874,0 
7983.4 
8092.7 


10100 
10200 
10300 
10400 


11046. 
1 1 155. 
11265. 
1 1374. 


1500 


1640.4 


4500 


4921,2 


7500 


8202.1 


10500 


11483. 


1600 
1700 
1900 
1900 


(749.8 
1859.1 

1968,5 
2077.9 


4600 
4700 
4800 
4900 


5030.6 
5140.0 
5 249,3 
5358.7 


7600 
7700 
7800 
7900 


B3H.4 
8420.8 

8530.2 
8639.5 


1 0600 
10700 
10800 
10900 


1 1 592. 
1 1702. 
11811. 
1 1920. 


2000 


2187,2 


5000 


5468.1 


8000 


8748.9 


nooo 


12030. 


2100 
2200 
2300 
2400 


2296.6 
2405,9 
2515,3 
2624 7 


5100 
5200 
5300 
5400 


5577.4 
5686.8 
5796.1 
5905 5 


8100 
8200 
8300 
8400 


8858.2 
8967.6 
9077.0 

r 1 DO. J 






2500 


2734.0 


5500 


6014.9 


8500 


9295.7 






2600 
2700 
2800 
2900 


2843.4 

2952.7 
3062.1 
3171,5 


5600 
5700 
5800 
5900 


6124.2 
6233.6 
6347.9 
6452.3 


8600 
8700 
8800 
8900 


9405.1 
95 1 4.4 
9623.8 
9733,1 






3000 


3280,1 


6000 


6561.8 


9000 


9842,5 







210 



f***-±* Original frwn 

D0li4«f by l.OO^k UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 
78 



TABU 2, 



Vardl 


M*t*n 


Yard J 


M*l*rl 


Yordl 


M. c tfi rf 


Yardi 




100 
200 
300 
400 


91.44 

T82.88 
274.32 
365.76 


3100 
3200 
3300 
3400 


2B34.6 

2926,1 
301 7.5 
3106.9 


6100 
6200 
6300 
6400 


5577.9 
5669.3 
5760.7 
5852,2 


9100 
9200 
9300 
9400 


6321. t 
8412.5 
8503.9 
8595,4 


500 


457.20 


3500 


3200.4 


6500 


5943.6 


9500 


6484.8 


600 
700 
600 
900 


548.64 

640.06 
73 1 .32 
622,96 


3400 
3700 
3800 
3900 


3291.6 
3383,3 
3474 T 7 
3566,2 


6600 
6700 
6300 

6900 


6035.1 

61 26.5 

62 \ 7.9 
6309,4 


9600 
9700 
9800 
9900 


6778.3 
8869.7 
8961.1 
9052.6 


1000 


914.40 


4000 


3457.4 


7000 


6400.6 


10000 


9T44.0 


1100 
1200 
1300 
MOO 


1005.6 
1097.3 
HBfl.7 
1260,2 


4100 
4200 
4300 
4400 


3749.0 
3640.5 
393 K9 
4023.4 


7100 
7200 
7300 
7400 


6492.3 
4583.7 
6675.1 
6746,6 


10100 
10200 
10300 
10400 


9235,5 
9324.9 
9418.3 
9509.8 


1500 


1371.6 


4500 


41 14.6 


7500 


6658.0 


10500 


9601.2 


1600 
1700 

ieoo 

1900 


1463.0 
1554.5 
1445,9 
1737,4 


4400 
4700 
4 BOO 
4 POO 


4206.2 
4297.7 
4369.1 
4460.6 


7600 
7700 
7800 
7900 


6949.5 
7040.9 
7332,3 
7223,8 


10600 
10700 
10600 
10900 


9692 7 
9764.1 
9675.5 
9967.0 


2000 


1628,8 


5000 


4572.0 


8000 


7315.2 


11000 


10058, 


2100 
2200 
2300 
2400 


1920.2 
201 1.7 
2103,1 
2194 r 6 


5100 
5 200 
5300 
5400 


4663.4 
4754.9 
4B46.3 
4937*8 


6 TOO 
6200 
6300 
6400 


7406.7 
7498.1 
7589.5 
768 1 .0 


11 100 
1 1200 
1 1 300 
11400 


10149. 
10241. 
10332. 
10424. 


2500 


2266.0 


5500 


J029.2 


B500 


77724 


1 1500 


10515. 


2600 
2700 
2600 
2900 


23774 
2466.9 
2560.3 
2651.6 


5600 
5700 
.5 ft 00 

5900 


5120,7 
5212.1 
5303,5 
5395,0 


6600 
8700 
6600 
B900 


7863? 
7955,3 
6046.7 
61 38.2 


1 1400 
1 1700 
1 1800 
1 1900 


10607. 
10696, 
10790. 
10861. 


3000 


2743,2 


6000 


5466,4 


9000 


8229 6 


12000 


10973, 



211 

& f^mml,-* Original from 

Digged by liOOglt UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



ANQULAR CONVERSION TABLE 1 ^ - DEGR.EES TO -MILS 



Otgrwi 





t 


1 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


1 


9 


00 





It 


36 


53 


71 


09 


107 


124 


142 


160 


10 


178 


196 


21 3 


231 


n in 

24V 






302 


T 1 fl 


338 


20 


356 


373 


391 


409 


427 




462 


480 


498 


516 


30 






569 


587 


604 


622 




459 


676 


693 


40 


711 


729 


747 


764 


782 


800 


8 1 8 


836 


del 

853 


871 


50 


AS9 


907 


924 


942 


960 


978 


994 


1013 


J031 


1049 


60 


1067 


1 ^18°4 


1107 


1 120 


1138 


1156 


iir 


1191 


1209 


1227 


-rrh 

70 


1 744 


1 767 


1 2BQ 


1 i t*o 
1 29B 


141/ 

1316 


13 3 3 


1 3 9 1 


i lie 


1 107 

1 38/ 


1 40* 


mm mm, 

30 


1 477 


1 440 


1 450 


U76 


1493 


151 1 


1 52 y 


1 34/ 


i KAa 
1 f04 


i c a •} 
1 J8 2 


90 


1600 






| ^^jni "v c r j i q n f q (™l o t 1 j 1 c 


17,77778 mill) 











TM E9-325A 

80-32 

CHAPTER 7 

REFERENCES 

80. PUBLICATIONS INDEXES, 

The following publications indexes should be consulted frequently 
for latest changes or revisions of references given in this chapter and 
for new publications relating to materiel covered in this manual; 

a. Introduction to Ordnance Catalog {explain- 

ing SNL system) ASF Cat. 

ORD 1 IOC 

b. Ordnance Publications for Supply Index 

(index to SNL's) . ... ASF Cat. 

ORD 2 QPSI 

c. Index to Ordnance Publications (listing 

FSM's, TM's, TCs, and TB T s of interest 
to Ordnance personnel, OPSR, FSMWO's, 
BSD, S of SR's, OSSCs, and OFSB's, and 
including alphabetical listing of Ordnance 
major items with publications pertaining 
thereto) OFSB 1-1 

(1. List of Publications for Training (listing 
MR's, MTP's, T/BA's, T/A% FM's, 
TM's, TR's, TB T s, SB's, MWO's f WDLOV 
and Firing Tables) FM 21-6 

List of Training Films, Film Strips, and 
Film Bulletins (listing TF% FS's T and 
FB's by serial number and subject) FM 21-7 

Military Training Aids (listing graphic 
training aids, models, devices, and dis- 
J> ^3^^ 5 -- j -- L,j -- , * j - ,jjB " ,jjBLL - , -- , ""' , - , - t,j - , " L,j - ,sLtj - , " it,j - ,s '- ,j ^^Ri 2 L ~~S 

81. STANDARD NOMENCLATURE LISTS* 

a* Cleaning, preserving, and lubricating ma- 
terials; recoil fluids, special oils, and mis- 
cellaneous related items ASF Cat 

ORD 5 SNL K 1 

82. EXPLANATORY PUBLICATIONS, 

a. Ammunition* 

Ammunition, general TM 9-1900 

Range regulations for firing ammunition for 

training and target practice , t AR 75(M0 

b. Cleaning, preserving, lubricating, and weld- 

ing materials and similar items issued by 

the Ordnance Department . TM 9-850 

213 

Digged by Google UNIVERSITY CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 

sz 

GERMAN 105- MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 

c* Deconta mi nation. 

Decontamination ■■■■■■ ,JJ JJI-tJJJLI I TM 3-220 

Defense against chemical attack FM 21-40 

d. Fire Control. 

Auxiliary fire control instruments (field 
glasses, eyeglasses, telescopes, and 

watches) , TM 9-575 

Field artillery fire control instruments TM 6-220 

e. Maintenance and Repair, 

Artillery lubrication, general OFSB 6-4 

Cold weather lubrication and service of ar~ 

tillery materiel . >yj OFSB 6-5 

f. MiBcellaneoua. 

German 88 mm antiaircraft gun materiel ... TM E9-369A 

Handbook on German military forces TM 30-450 

Military dictionary (English-German, Ger- 
man-English) ,..,...,„, TM 30-255 



214 

m , . r^rtrtnljj Original from 

Digged by kjOOgK UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 

INDEX 



Fags 

Hill---- 163 



L I I 1 



Accidents, ammunition* field 
report of 

Adjustment , r , h 

Aiming circle 
description 
operstion ■ ■ i - - H r i -i 

orienting - - * 

testa and adjustments ........ 

Aiming plates 

Aiming post ^ . 

Air density, German measurements 
compared with American . 

Air density correction 108, 

Air testing and refilling apparatus 

Ammunition 

authorized rounds 

care T handling, and preservation 

cartridge case labels 

charge section markings. 

classification 

description and identification 

projectiles r , , 

propelling charges 

field report of accidents 

fllZCS _. + + + i- a> i. J , A ._ t i 

glossary (German to English) 

ammunition items 

ammunition terms 

ex plosives 

H.E. fillers 

interchangeability 

packing 

precautions in handling captured 

ammunition 

preparation for firing 

primers *•*.-*■* 

tropical ammunition f _* 

weights of shell and explosive . . 

(See also Firing tables and 
Projectiles ) 

Angle of site 

German values 

to rend i ■ 

Angle of site mechanism, battery 
comi 



158 

77 

9a 

gg 

103 
104 

94 
94 

105 
1L2 
163 



150 
151 
141 

143 
14H 
158 
152 

159 
160 



162 
155 
146 

157 
143 
155 
1S7 
5 



105 
104 




Angle of site mount 98 

Angular conversion table (degrees 

to mils ) P .... 212 

Antifreeze compounds . 58 

Artillerie Rechenschieber 34 (See 

Artillery computer 34) 
Artillery computer 34 

care and preservation 119 

description 104 t 106 

operation 

examples H 117 

readings , , 113 

settings 108 

preparation for travel. . 119 

Azimuth, to read 104 

Azimuth micrometer, battery com- 
mander's telescope 138 

Azimuth mount 99 



Ballistic data 146 

Bore brush 163 

Bore sight 

Care and preservation ... 95 

description 94 

operation 95 

Bottom carriage 29 







data . . . . - 
description and functioning 
inspection and adjustment 
Breech mechanism 
assembly 

care and preservation 

description 
breech cover 
oreech mechanism 

disassembly 





■ - - . * + 



. . . . . 



5,6 
33 
80 

«4 

53 



rr-iH---- 



to close 



■ ■■i ii i ■ ■ F 1 



ju-r *;.+;*. - * + ~ j - j - - 

ring, inspection and ad* 



L . . . 

i block 
description and 
inspection and adjustment 



- — + + + - 4 



...... 



7 
82 

7 
48 
40 

77 

7 
77 

9 



215 



Digrtiied by GoOgl< 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY' OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 



GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 



p i *:-4 4. • , ■ >_■+ 



■i i ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ 



Cap (recoil mechanism), front 
Capacities (liquid) . 

Carriage 

care and preservation 

data 

description and functioning 

Fluids used in 

inspection and adjustment . 

malfunctions and corrections 
Cartridge cuse 

charge section markings ... 



labels 



r ■ i , - - 



»■»■*■* i ■ 



packing - 

Computer 34 (See Artillery 

computer 34) 
Control plunger (recoil mechanism 
Control rod (recoil mechanism) 
Cooling cylinder 

Cradle 
data 

description 



■.."4 m i ■ j j h b i 



■r ■ * * + 



i r i ■ 



----- 



Pag* 

22 
6 

58 
5 
16 

. 58 
77 
. 81 

. 151 
150 
152 



) 22 
. 22 
19 



cradle . , , 
cradle cover 
functioning 



..... i 



■ | . ■ ■ ■ ■ I +■ 



. . . . 



Drawbar 



j i ■ -f + -f — — t- - - f- ♦ •* ■* i 



• - - 



5,6 

17 
163 
17 



33 



Elevating mechanism 

description and functioning 

effort of elevating gear 

excessive efforts required to 
operate . , , . . 

inspection and adjustment 

to elevate . , . . . . 

Elevation (carriage) ,., T , 

Ent fern un&sm esse r 34 (See Range 

tinder 34 > 
EquUihrator 

air pressure , 

check before firing ... 

description and functioning . . . 

filling and charging 

inspection and adjustment 

weight of 



31 
6 

81 

79 
40 
6 



1- * 



6 
48 
17 
71 
79 

5 



Extractor 

broken extractor 

description and functioning 



80 
9 



98 
140 

58 
12 
77 



Fire control equipment 

care and preservation 139 

description 

lubricants 

Firing mechanism 

care and preservation 
description and functioning 
inspection and adjustment . 
Firing tables 

explanation of 168 

field howitzer projectile (10cm 

*Pz gr, ) , . 190, 1 9 1 

field howitzer shell, smoke 
(F.H. Gr. NG.) 

charge 1 204 

charge 2 , 205 

charge 3 , . , 206 

charge 4 207 

charge 5 208 

charge 6 . . . , , . 209 

field howitzer shells (F.H. Gr.) 
and (F.H. Gr. 38 stg.) 

charge 1 . , - 3 70 

charge 2 174 

charge 3 178 

charge 4 . , - r r . . . , 184 

charge S 190 

charge 6>w . . > . . 198 

Firing the howitzer 

fails to fire 80 

points to be observed before and 

during firing 48 

preparation of 

ammunition 143, 146 

charges . . . , r 152 

fuzes 153, 155 

recoil and counterrecoil action 23 

to fire ........... 

to plac* in position 

Flash reducer, correction for . 110 
Fuze setter 
description 

fuze setting 

operation 



50 
40 



r H « to 



_ - * j j 



131 
117 

132 



216 



Digitized by GoOgl< 



Original from 
UNIVERSITY' OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 



INDEX 



F — (ConfrJ) Po „ M 

Fuze setter time scale 105 Malfunctions and corrections 80 

Fuzes Mutch the pointer indexes, veri- 

description end preparation for fixation 93 

firing . . . 153 Metro message* artillery computer 

general discussion 152 34 , , , . . 1G8 

Mount, telescope 

cere and preservation 93 

description B5 

German, English translations of verification 

(See Translations, German the P° iftter indexes 93 

to English) mount 91 

Gewichtsklasse (See Weight-zone Muzzle cover ,,, 167 

markings) Mu " le velocity 

Glossary (German to English) 159 correction 112 

Grease containers 167 maximum velocity S 

Grund-stufe 112 

Grundstufen Tafel , . . 112 

Gunner's quadrant . . ..... 94 Oil containers . , , . . . . 167 

Optical parts, care end preservation 139 

H p 

High pressure cylinder 23 Packing ammunition 146 

Howitzer Packing cartridge cases 152 

care and preservation ........ 56 Periscope 9R 

characteristics t 1 Plotting rules 128 

data - 5 Powder temperature, correction for 110 

description and functioning ... 7 Primers . , , , , 155 

disassembly and assembly 82 Projectile 

inspection and adjustment 77 correction for weight 112 

malfunctions and corrections . . . SO description of shells 

operation 40 armor-piercing 146 

high-explosive . , 145 

smoke 146 

' identification 143 

Propelling charge 

Inspection 77 description 14S t 151 

identification r ........ . 14 S 

L R 

Laying the howitzer . . . . 8o Rammer 167 

Lighting unit 95 Range, maximum , 5 

Linear conversion tables Range correction (artillery com- 

meters to yards 210 puter 34) 113 

yards to meters 211 Range finder 34 

Loading the howitzer 50 care and preservation 128 

Lubricants, fire control equipment 140 characteristics 120 

Lubricating gun and hose 167 description 119 

Lubrication . . . 55 halving adjustment .... 126 

217 

t*%f>nlt> Original from 

DlgmzorJ by V.iOO{Jlt UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 



TM E9-325A 



GERMAN 105-MM HOWITZER MATERIEL 



R — iCorvtd) 


Pa 9* 






Range finder 34 — (Contd.) 




operation , 


133 


operation , 


126 


tests and adjustments . 


138 


range adjustment 




Telescope (aiming circle) 


95 


distant target method 


127 


Telescope RbL F t 16 , "! . . 


8* 


infinity method 


123 


Telescope RbL F, 32 


m 


Recoil 




Telescope verification . . . . T T 




abnormal length of 


81 


Telescope with extension 


91 


measurements , . , , 


6 


Top carriage . . . . r , 


25 


Recoil cylinder 




Trails 




check before firing 


48 


data , ■. r r t 


S P 6 


description and functioning 


20 


description and functioning. . r r 


31 


filling the cylinder 


69 


difficulty in closing 


81 


inspection end adjustment . . . . 


77 


Translations, German to English 




Recoil mechanism 




air density correction 


110 


check during firing 


4S 


ammunition 105 


159 


description and functioning . . . 


19 


cartridge case labels 


150 


Recoil piston and rod ........... 


22 


essentia] translations 


6 


Recuperator cylinder 




flash reducer 


110 


air pressure , 


6 


metro message table 


103 


check before firing 


48 


Traveling position, to place 




filling and charging , 


59 


weapon in . , . , 


50 


impaction and adjustment 


78 


Traversing mechanism 




Recuperator mechanism 


23 


description and functioning 


31 


Recuperator ram and rod 


25 


effort of traversing gear 


6 


Recuperator ram cylinder 


25 


inspection and adjustment . . 


79 






to traverse 


40 


s 




traverse (carriage) .. , 


6 






Tripod {aiming circle) 


99 


Saddle data . . . 


5,6 


Tube 




Safety lock 


12 


care and preservation ... 


56 


She LI h armor-piercing . . r r 


146 


check before firing 


48 


Shell, high-exploaive 








ballistic data 


146 


%v 




description . . , , . r . r . , - , . r , , . . 


145 






Shell, smoke 


146 


Weight-zone markings, ammunition 


143 


Shell remover 


167 


Wetter-Meldung, compared with 




Shield, thickness of plate ..... 


6 


metro message . 


105 


Sights bore (See Bore sight) 




Wheels 




Sight cover . . . , + + + 


167 


description and functioning ... 


33 


Sighting equipment 


85 


inspection and adjustment 


GO 


Spade j, trail , . 


33 


replacement r , , 


84 


Surveying rod - 


128 


Wind component setting 


110 






Wrenches 




T 




engineers wrench .... 


163 






fuze wrench 


167 


Tangent elevation, (artillery com- 








puter 34 > . , 


115 


z 




Telescope, battery commander** 








description ...... 


132 


Ziinderstellung in Grad vom Kreuz 


105 



RAPD19JUL44— MM 21fl 



PUBLICATIONS DEPARTMENT - RAH IT AM ARSENAL 

C"^fw-fcnlf* Original from 

Digitized by V.iOOglt UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA